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  5. "Er hört Noten."

"Er hört Noten."

Translation:He hears notes.

April 11, 2013

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karenskywalker

what can this mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karenskywalker

yeah, if it's about those NOTES, then it makes some sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradfordGo1

even if it refers to musical notes....you read notes more than you hear notes...at least with such a broad sentence as this....i believe....but whatever...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jagerboy96

A true musician "hears" notes. If you are playing music by sheet music alone, it would be rather boring. Hearing is the joy of music.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinerSelb

i have yet to come across someone who can actually hear graphical symbols rather than the sounds they stand for.

http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/Note#Bedeutung1a


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinerSelb

i don't understand why i have been downvoted. compare to letters: you don't actally hear letters, but phonemes. letters are only the means of writing them down. same with notes, they are used to write down sounds, but they are not identical with the sounds themselves. so you can read a note, but what you hear is a sound / tone. at least it's like that in german. man hört einen ton.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crimsonae

I gave you an upvote after understanding your intent, but honestly your tone had me questioning whether or not I was witnessing an informing or a condescension.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UBK10

In English language a note can refer to its sound as well as to the symbol.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toldge

I understand where you're coming from, but, as a classically trained, professional musician, I can tell you that it's perfectly correct to call them notes. Calling something a sound can be used for most everything, but it is usually used for complex sounds or the overall sound of the piece/section/instrument/etc., and tone is usually used to describe more pure sounds such as a single note, especially if it is played by a horn or is a simple wave played by a synth or computer (eg sine, sawtooth, triangle, square, etc.). Timbre describes the qualitative attributes that make up a sound, and tone can sometimes mean the same thing as timbre. A pitch is similar to a note, but more technical, especially when dealing with some of the post-modern that uses set theory, in which it may also use pitch classes.

In conclusion, note means more than the literal notes on the paper and one may describe a pitch as a note, even when no sheet music is ever used (eg "wow, they held that note out for a while!").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

ReinerSelb

I hear notes is perfectly reasonable thing to say in English.

As in....I hear notes there but they are poorly done.....

The issue is whether Noten means both the graphical note and the sound of a note as in English as Duo says or whether, in German, it is restricted to the graphical symbol as you say.

Multiple sources that looked at all reference the graphical nature of Noten. I could't find any that extended it to the sound of the symbol as English does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toldge

Don't know why people are downvoting you. As a musician, I can tell you you're right that english uses it to refer to both the symbol and the sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cazort

I think it's great that DuoLingo includes exercises that get at the alternate meanings of words like "Noten", because it's significant that Noten=notes both for musical notes and written notes in German, as in some languages different words are used for musical notes.

That said, this sentence has little context. I'm a musician, and it still had me scratching my head, especially given that it came up in a lesson that was almost exclusively focused on education.

I think this exercise could be hugely improved by adding an extra word, like "The musician hears notes." or changing it further to something like "The musician plays notes." or something of the sort. This would avoid the head-scratching and make the learning seem more natural. In the real world, there would almost always be context for someone to understand a usage like that. One thing that I like about DuoLingo is that it often provides this context, but in this particular sentence, it's failing to do so!

I'd love to see this fixed or improved!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dortyol

Unfortunately you won't see it improved in the near future because, if I understood well, there is nobody in DL who is charged to do it any more. It's a pity but I can understand it. The concept is made on the basis of volunteering. Anyway, thanks a lot to DL for the already done.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Konnall

This is the worst pronunciation I have heard yet on Duolingo. Sounds like "Er wird nuden" or something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monika-E

As horrible as the pronunciation of Bäckerei


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxUjevic

Er hat Nudel :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QED-hamza-QED

If the pronunciation was not clear to you, you can report it to make it more clear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arealhumanbean

Does anyone know if this is notes as in music or notes as in pen and paper?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dxrsam

The ones in music.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monika-E

Note - Musik Notizen - pen and paper


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bynny2015

From: http://en.pons.com/translate?q=note&l=deen&in=ac_en&lf=en

note (message) = Bescheid m

note (message) = Mitteilung f

to leave a note = eine Nachricht hinterlassen

to keep a note of sth = [sich dat ] etw notieren


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TalGlobus

Why does 'hört' translate to 'hears' but 'gehört' translates to 'belongs (to)'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DancingLass

You've probably already got this figured out by now, but maybe this will help clarify for someone else wondering the same thing:

Ich habe die Musik gehört. (I heard the music.) In this sentence, "gehört" is the PAST PARTICIPLE of the verb "hören".

Es gehört mir. (It belongs to me.) In this sentence, "gehört" is the 3rd person (he-she-it) PRESENT tense of the entirely separate verb "gehören", meaning "to belong to".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Voenskjall

(I know this thread is old by now)

I think what TalGlobus meant was rather how the words are related (if not I'm sorry). Could it be that the meaning/root of the two words are derived from the same word?

'gehören' - something belongs to someone, it listens to their name (just like 'hören'), there is a relation between the object and the person, therefore the possession listens to their owner's name, if it makes any sense or made any sense ever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickMcT

One of the suggested right answers is "He is listening to marks". This seems like jibberish, unless the marks (from an examination, perhaps?) are being read out by someone. Does the german phrase mean this? My own answer, "he is listening to music", was just to find out what the german sentence might mean. I am still not sure! I would agree that the best answer is probably "he is listening to notes", but I am not sure if this is a very good sentence to teach german - unless it is commonly used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rholler8

this sentence makes no sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RicardoFlo687497

He is known as the "Note Whisperer"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BradfordGo1

probably if a sentence generate this much confusion it should be left out of Duolingo and just left up to individual learner to figure it out in context one day it may appear in their German speaking lives...no cool Duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnAtkins4

he hears notes as in money!!! paper notes!! rustling


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EaterofPumkin

Shouldn't it be he hears "the notes?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grofte

Okay, but why is the correct translation now "He catches notes" ? Makes no sense to me. Hears notes? Fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catherine180222

Grades is also accepted which makes even less sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Catherine180222

Grades is also accepted as correct which makes even less sense than notes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickMcT

One of the suggested right answers is "He is listening to marks". This seems like jibberish, unless the marks (from an examination, perhaps?) are being read out by someone. Does the german phrase mean this? My own answer, "he is listening to music", was just to find out what the german sentence might mean. I am still not sure! I would agree that the best answer is probably "he is listening to notes", but I am not sure if this is a very good sentence to teach german - unless it is commonly used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/supu1

There is not such suggested right answer! There are only possible translations of the word "Note" in possible different contexts


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karen646472

No idea what this sentence is supposed to mean. I simply can't imagine anyone hearing or listening to " notes". Surely you would hear "music"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Monika-E

A pianotuner listens to a sound of the note. And when I tune my instrument, I listen to the tone of anote a in order to make my a sound the same.

In my opinion a "Note" is the black dott printed on white paper and we listen to the sound of a note.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flitteriefie

noten sounds like noodles. confusing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatMason1

Incorrect. People do not "hear" notes. One hears pitch represented by the notes!

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