"Das Frühstück ist kurz."

Translation:The breakfast is short.

April 13, 2013

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/xMitu

I am not native English speaker and I don't get it - how the breakfast can be short?

April 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems
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As an example, if you're part of a tour group (where you follow a schedule set out by a company), they could say something like "Breakfast will be short this morning as we have to get to the museum by 9:00." Which would mean that you don't have a lot of time to eat because we have to leave soon to make it to the museum on time.
Does that help?

Edit 2 years later with links for the nay sayers about breakfast being "short":

Short definitions:

Breakfast definition:

Add the definition of "breakfast" with "short": The first meal of the day will take a small amount of time. There is no need to add any other qualifier or to specify anything else.

April 13, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/cquark
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Ah, ok. I had no idea what this sentence was going for until this. But I think a native English speaker would add "time" in this case -- "We only have a short time for breakfast," or possibly "Time for breakfast is short" or in this case, "Breakfast time will be cut short this morning." I don't think I've heard anyone saying "Breakfast will be short."

July 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/longname

Or “breakfast is brief ”

July 7, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/f4b068
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better say 'quick'

May 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/NoMoreRomance

I get what it means, but usually in English we would say we are going to have a quick breakfast or fast breakfast or speedy it up. Short would not be used this way in the US.

November 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/hooray.its.jay

Saying breakfast will be short sounds pretty normal to me and im a native

June 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/EntropyMan
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It doesn't sound idiomatic to me.

March 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ArvindhMani
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Its possible that this is common German usage .. Could a German native speaker clarify here please?

August 4, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
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Precisely. I've seen this in brochures, or similar wording. (Short breakfast this morning, etc.). As in all languages, there are a lot of shortcuts in normal speech - we don't always spell everything out.

January 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Peelyo

But it would hardly, hardly ever be so literally stated in this sense.

The breakfast is short!

May 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sparroe

Yes. I think quick is the more natural English word to use for kurz here.

June 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/peter.sand

As a native English speaker I wouldn't ever say it was short. Short automatically brings size to mind and in the vertical direction unless there is something to tell me otherwise.

December 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/allic.broo

I could understand if the idiom "cut short" was used. But the translation also does include "brief", so it still makes sense.

March 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Fatema_Zarzour

does that mean the time of breakfast

June 15, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/nantie

i am scottish and would never use " the breakfast is short" nor never heard it used this way

October 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jprudy

It is common in the US to describe events as short. It must just be a cultural difference of sorts.

April 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JennLyn

I'm American, we really normally do not say Breakfast is short. If in a time crunch we would be more likely to say "eat quickly" or "breakfast needs to be short." I took this sentence to really mean that we were eating a small breakfast.

May 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/NoMoreRomance

@nantie It's the same here. You would never hear this sentence used in the US. The only one you may hear is that "we are short on time" so have to hurry things up a bit. Or he is short meaning he has a short temper.

November 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/junorecords

It can't be short, you would never say this in English. It is a bad example. The time for breakfast could be "short" but the breakfast can only be "small" or "big" which refers to size. Even so you would say it in a completely different way. We will have a quick breakfast for example. Not a short breakfast.

July 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/gavc85

maybe in germany they have sausage for breakfast and it can either be short or long! :D

January 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/misawa.mandi
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Imagine it with lunch instead of breakfast. "We'll have a short lunch and get back to work." That's completely natural and widely used. I just think we don't talk about breakfast the same way because Americans don't often eat breakfast with others (outside of family) when they're pressed for time.

March 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/sycondaman

Right, but you almost never say "The lunch is short."

March 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/grimmjowsama

No, I'm a native English speaker and have used "short" to describe meals this way (as well as hearing others do it). I've never heard someone say "The breakfast", though. That's just unnatural.

June 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffMather
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"What do you think about the B&B?" "I like the rooms, but the breakfast isn't very good."

August 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/taoistextremist

Yeah, it's usually something like "that was a short lunch"

January 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/jprudy

I am a native English speaker and would like to help explain the variety of uses for the word short. Short is often used to describe a distance, however like many words in the English language one word can have multiple meanings. Short, isn't just limited to distance but also is used in situations to describe time.

Example: I'm running short on time.

The beauty of the English language is that there are many words that serve a dual purpose. Thus, you have less vocabulary to learn.

Hope this helps :)

April 5, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Guruchakra
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this is not a natural idiomatic expression in English... I think it's important to note that if you drop 'the', the sentence becomes clearer; 'breakfast is short' implying that the act of having breakfast is brief in duration. Adding 'the' implies an actual meal, the physical object that is breakfast.

December 11, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/withanie
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I don't think I'd say "the breakfast is short," but I WOULD say "breakfast is short" or maybe "breakfast will be short", referring to how much time I had to eat it. That doesn't sound awkward to me.

January 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/fAEth_
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Yes, but Duolingo is trying to teach/reenforce the word genders.

August 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/jzyls
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For those struggling with the literal translation of "The breakfast is short", I believe that 'brief' is the most appropriate translation for 'kurz' in this context

December 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Arcolithe

anyone else thought that by short they didn't mean time, but the actual height of the platter? ...

June 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/nicogutyskacore

i did, so i put quick instead of short and i got it right

September 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sbajcar
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Confused for a second - is "kurz" for height or length of time?

June 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sparroe

It can be for physical length and also for time. I don't think it's usually used for a person's height, but maybe the height of other things.

July 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Daenerys-S

Can kurz also be used if you were explaining the length of something?

August 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PALewis88
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From what I can see in my dictionary it generally mean a short period of time. Short, brief, etc.

January 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Jushmita

this totally makes sense if you are part of tour group or something. even i thought it should have been 'quick' instead of short. in my language thats what we say for both the situations. But as usual context is everything in all languages.

December 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/illsley
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Unless this is a German idiom, it makes absolutely no sense and ought to be removed imho.

June 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/StefanMaqueo

I wish it could make up for auto-correct mistakes. I got shirt instead of short and got it wrong, but not in purpose.

October 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/DexavioR

Soo, the breakfast is short? ^^

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/XxX2spookyXxX

Could i get some help with the pronunciation of fruhstuck?

December 5, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AseemKumar

To me it sounds like Fuh-sh-tuck...The "h" is very soft.

March 12, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/CatherineDurant

i think the sentence means 'it was a short breakfast' or 'We need to keep the breakfast short'. Wow! this is why Duolingo sometimes confuses me! But I learn a lot, though! :)

January 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ForesterD

I am an English native speaker. 'The breakfast is short' is pretty meaningless in English. I guess it does have a meaning in German. It is just one of those direct translation problems. Languages do not always match conveniently.

June 8, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Yarouge
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Always remember that you don't learn other languages only by translating, but by understanding and making sense of what is heard...

Obviously, the breakfast can not be short, but you could translate "kurz" as "brief; that is the only other thing that make sense.

"We are gonna have a brief breakfast."

September 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/PALewis88
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Mein Frühstück ist kurz. Es ist Brot und Marmelade. (is that correct?)

January 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/thebigfigster

So, I misspell the article and they count it wrong this time, but other times, it's Ok. What gives?

April 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sycondaman

As far as I can tell, it depends on how you misspell. They only detect certain variations on a word as spelled incorrectly. If your misspelling isn't on that list, then they count it as a different word and you get it marked incorrect.

April 20, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
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why do I keep translating this as 'the breakfast is early'? The breakfast is short doesn't make much sense to me, idiomatically speaking, and I am a native English speaker.

May 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryLea11
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Ah, would 'the breakfast is brief' be a better answer?

May 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/VartikaKapoor

Another suggested translation for this sentence is 'The breakfast is fast'. The German word for 'fast' is 'schnell'. The two, 'kurz' and 'schnell' cannot be synonyms, unless the intended meaning of the statement is a 'quick breakfast'? Otherwise, it's confusing!

June 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/roninrabbit

As a native English speaker, it doesn't seem that weird to say something like "we will have a short breakfast"

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/roninrabbit

Help with the pronunciation of kurz

July 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasStru3

Breakfast is short makes no sense. Saying 'the breakfast is quick' would make a little more sense for time (though it's still not great, or 'We are short of breakfast' if it's that somewhere has run out of breakfast food.

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Chogas
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Though 'time' has no shape...but it can be distinguished height....

October 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Keysch

Would some one Verify this as true, or say it's incorrect? Klein is short. Kurz is small. There's a difference because Klein is a height matter, and Kurz is being a size.

June 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/sjarjar
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Yes, saying "breakfast is short" in English sounds very incorrect to a native speaker's ear. Perhaps a better translation from German to English would be "breakfast is rushed" or "breakfast is hurried". I would also agree that "quick" is understandable though perhaps not very common.

June 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/quinchen

Klein means "little" or "small". Kurz means "short" in terms of length.

Ex: Das klein Mädchen hat die Grippe (the little girl has the flu)

<pre> Das Mädchen hat kurze Haare (the girl has short hair) </pre>
February 27, 2014
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