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https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

5 weeks later, I conquered Duolingo and I want to share progress/supplementation. Feedback welcome!

I finished the Duolingo tree the other day in about 5 weeks. As a precursor, I have been on Duolingo before but I only got as far as Basics 2 before giving it up for about 6 months. I also had close to 5 years of high school and college Spanish (4 years of bad high school classes, 1 year of excellent college classes that sadly I did not keep up with). So I kinda had a very rough basis in Spanish to begin with, but I never got any further than the present tense, and even that was extremely basic and rudimentary. And also I have had quite a bit of extra time over the last month to devote to learning Spanish. So if it sounds like I sped through everything...I did.

As another precursor, I think Duolingo is an amazing jumping off point for learning a language. If you're like me, you like having some sort of structure or guidance when first starting out, which Duolingo provides. However, I have found that I definitely need supplementation to (1) provide grammar support and instruction and (2) learn more and progress past what Duolingo offers to achieve high proficiency (Duolingo will definitely not bring you to fluency, but like I said, excellent starting point).

I also took a 3-5 days' hiatus from Duolingo about halfway through the tree because I was getting discouraged from a trial and error style of learning. During that hiatus I started listening to the Michel Thomas Spanish CDs and while it is very slow-going, my grammar, tenses control, and indirect/direct object pronouns understanding skyrocketed. After about halfway through the CDs (it's about 12 hours of instruction IIRC), I was able to get back into Duolingo and super-progress through the tree.

I took the Cervantes Institute right after finishing the tree, and I am currently at B1.1-B1.2, even though I still feel like I'm blundering about and can only ask where the bathroom is. By the end of the year, my goal is to be a strong B2 and next year I plan on taking a vacation to Spain. Eventually my goal is to be as fluent as possible without living in a Spanish speaking country; I'd like to have something to show for the 5 years of classes I sat through.

Just about everything that I list below, I started doing about 3-4 weeks ago. Some good resources that were motivating and helped me build out my plan was Benny's Fluent in 3 Months book (general language learning strategies) and The Telenovela Method (Spanish-based but useful for all languages).

I built two Anki decks - vocabulary and phrases - that I put everything that I pick up from Duolingo, podcasts, reading, etc. Interestingly, from Duolingo alone, I have been exposed to 1,134 words and phrases (I won't say learned because that's a lot of stuff to learn in a relatively short period of time).

The rest of my supplementation so far has been obviously Michel Thomas and some podcasts - Notes in Spanish beginners and Coffee Break Spanish. They both are rather elementary for grammar and most vocabulary at this point, but it is very useful for building listening comprehension and pronunciation. Plus both are Castilian dialect, which is what I'm focusing on.

Other things that I did a little bit of but will be spending significantly more time on - reading Harry Potter in Spanish, watching movies and TV shows in Spanish, and listening to/translating Shakira (because I like her and her use of Spanish idioms is really quite clever). I am also in the online Español Salamanca A2 course on Miriada X, and while it is slightly below my level at this point but being able to see real-world situations and exercise listening comprehension is invaluable IMO. I also have a grammar workbook that I plan on using to strengthen some weaker concepts (like the stupid subjunctive tense) and just in general get more familiar/comfortable with the grammar. And I also plan on making use of the Duolingo review as well as the immersion activity. Finally later I plan on working with a Spanish teacher through italki to become comfortable with speaking and holding real conversations.

I know this sounds like a lot, but Spanish learning has definitely become a major hobby and like I mentioned I want to get as good at it as possible in a relatively short amount of time. I won't be doing everything all the time but at the very least, I will be doing Duolingo and Anki reviews daily.

So with all that, is there anything else you would recommend I get into or focus more on? I know that a lot of people advocate not going crazy with the grammar and such, but I am super analytical about this sort of stuff (which has helped so far) and I want to eventually be able to read and comprehend original Spanish literature (like Don Quijote, one of my all-time favorite books). Thanks for reading so far and helping out with an awesome resource for language learning!

4 years ago

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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The Extr@ videos on YouTube are really good, and I hear Destinos is good too but I have only glanced at the first one. Both target intermediate level speakers.

If you can afford a Kindle Touch or a Kindle Paperwhite, get one and purchase the Collins Spanish to English dictionary. Then download free books in Spanish and read them on your Kindle. When you come across a word you don't know, simply touch the word and get the English definition. The Collins is very good about including phrasal verbs and idioms, too. The Kindle Fire and Kindle reading applications for mobile devices and PC don't support the bilingual dictionary. It has to be a Touch or a Paperwhite.

Watch movies with the Spanish soundtrack enabled. You can enable English or Spanish subtitles or none at all.

Read the news in Spanish. Listen to Spanish radio. RTVE.es channel 5 Radio is particularly good because it is mostly news, interviews, special interest stories... all talk.

Get your butt on Verbling and start chatting with other Spanish speakers worldwide.

Anki has a couple of really great public decks for Spanish/English vocabulary. Download them. One is called "Essential Spanish Vocabulary Top... " (something, my phone cuts off the rest. Top 500, top 1000, top 5000... something). The othe ris "Advanced Spanish Vocabulary". There are a few minor errors in them but nothing worth fretting about. A couple of obvious transposing of lettrse and nothing serious :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I'm actually planning on getting a Paperwhite within the next month, so I will be sure to set up the bilingual dictionary on that and read from there. I've been wanting one for a while, but after finding out my Kindle apps don't support bilingual dictionaries, I've decided I needed to get the Kindle sooner rather than later.

Thanks for all the extra stuff to do. I have an account on italki but I'm probably going to use it only to find a teacher, as I got deluged with very unappealing/unwanted follower requests and conversations. I also have a lang-8 account to practice my writing, but I haven't done anything with that yet.

I also downloaded those two Anki decks. Both look pretty useful, especially since I have a very odd, and probably not very common, collection of vocabulary in my self-made decks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BobbieL
BobbieL
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FYI, not that long ago rumor had it that Amazon was getting close to releasing the next iteration of the Paperwhite. (Which makes sense, they typically come out with them around the end of summer or the beginning of Autumn, I think). If you have plenty of other things to occupy yourself so the Paperwhite isn't urgent, you might want to focus on those rather than get something that will become obsolete very quickly.

Though, I've often heard it recommended that once you get to an intermediate level, you should try to just use a dictionary for the language you're leaning. I guess the idea is to shift yourself away from constantly translating things by reading definitions in the target language, rather than just getting a translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

Oh in that case, I will wait then. I've been wanting a Kindle for almost a year now, so waiting a few more months to see if there's a new one coming out won't be a big deal. The Kindle app on my iPad has a Spanish dictionary that I can use in the meantime to figure out what words mean. Plus there's always the Internet.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
Cephlin
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I'm learning French mostly, but this is such good advice lrtward! I must bookmark this discussion for future reference!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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There is a really good French deck if you're a beginner. It has 500 cards. Each card shows you a picture for the "front" side of the card, and then the "back" side shows the french word for the picture, and it is pronounced by a French speaker. Very cool, right? But it gets even more amazing: the masculine words are said by a male, and the feminine words are said by a female. I think it's brilliant, because you'll get used to associating the items with each voice and it will make remembering gender a lot easier. The deck is caled "French 500 coloured words with p..." and my phone truncates the rest of the name :-/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
Cephlin
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Wow, I started using that deck for about a week but stopped, but I never realised it split the voices based on the gender of the word, I think I'll go back to using it again now. Thank you very much.

I just saw someone mention a website called Lyrics Training which is still in beta but I've just tried it and it's totally amazing. You can listen to songs and then it gets you to fill in the blanks in the lyrics depending on the difficulty you choose (expert has all blanks and easy has only a few blanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

Felicidades. I am doing a reverse tree which I am finding helpful. It will indirectly teach you spanish you didn't see in the Spanish From English course, as the site is then delivered to you in spanish as if you are a native spanish speaker. Good Luck. Suerte.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I have been doing that as well, which has been an interesting change, and now I am even more aware of how confusing the English language is!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

yes, I was aware how confusing english is to a native spanish speaker but, as you say, doing the reverse tree has reinforced it for me, lol.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmeltonga
jmeltonga
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I am impressed and jealous of the time you have to give to this. Your definitely goal oriented and I am sure you will reach yours. Congratulations!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

Thanks; it's been a very odd month of inactivity for me recently, so I needed something to do before going crazy. But you have a much more impressive streak than I ever have!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PerroNegro
  1. Another great podcast you should check out is News in Slow Spanish. Every week there is a short news story (about 5 minutes) and then they ask you to pay for the full content. But, if you go back to the old episodes in iTunes you will see where the episode length changes to about a half hour. This is where they get really good as you get several news stories, then a grammar section, then a section on culture and idioms. 2. Also, I see you have been listening to the Notes in Spanish Beginner. Continue on with them to the intermediate and advanced levels and also the Notes in Spanish Gold is good (lots of cultural information and explanations about grammar and vocab). 3. For practice with music and lyrics go to lyricstraining.com where you can read transcripts for the song (which scroll karaoke-style under the video) and also play a game where you fill in the missing words in the lyrics. (I have seen several Shakira songs.) 4. There are all kinds of videos in Spanish on YouTube for learners. Also look for ¿Eres tú, Maria? And at LingusTV (onYouTube) there are a bunch of short sitcom style videos. I have only watched a couple but they have Spanish subtitles - always very helpful. Another series you may like is Mi Vida Loca put out by the BBC. It is somewhat interactive and takes place in Madrid and so will be good for your Castilian focus. Note on the Extr@ videos: I just finished watching them and they are great for learners. I couldn't believe I could understand almost everything. 5. If you have a ROKU device for your TV you can set up Spanish channels for free or change the settings on certain channels to only give you Spanish feeds. 6. A good Spanish verb book can be invaluable. (Mine is the Barron's 501 Spanish Verbs. The best IMO.) 7. Finally you can try to do a reverse tree on Duolingo. I have just begun my Spanish to English tree and so do not have much to say about it, but others have commented that it helps a lot with indirect object pronouns. Sorry this post is one big block of text. For some reason I am unable to return and create a line space between paragraphs.
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I have News in Slow Spanish added to my podcast list but I haven't yet started them; I think I'm intimidated by listening for a whole half hour without something visual to focus on (which is why I've ended up bookmarking a ton of YouTube series instead). I really like Notes in Spanish so far and want to go through their whole series. Barron's 501 Spanish Verbs is an awesome resource for me; I also have their Spanish Grammar book which is a great pocket reference and is very understandable. And I just started the reverse tree yesterday, which has already proven itself to be a tricky challenge. Thanks for the extra resources; I'll definitely be adding those to my list!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PerroNegro

I know what you mean about the visual focus. I actually listen to the podcasts I have downloaded over and over as I find myself drifting off often and so hear something new every time I listen! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
Cephlin
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Lyrics training is incredible!!!!!! How did you find that! How do I help them develop that? Is it open source?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PerroNegro

I agree with you - it is pretty great. I saw a DL user mention the site on another thread about a month ago. But I have no answers to your questions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
Cephlin
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It has made me happy that's for sure :D

I was practising with Stromae last night.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

I tell everyone about ! I love it too and use it a lot - I saw it on the en-- fr thread here.

I get the feeling that it is open source, because the songs have been uploaded by different people, but there seems to be a "holding bay" where they are checked, because some of the songs in the french section say something like "pending" or some such - can't remember exactly. I haven't registered, I just play as a guest, but maybe if you register, you will be given more info.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
Cephlin
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I've sent them an email asking if they want help coding anything. If I can find this discussion again when they reply, I'll give you an update.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

Great - I can't help with coding. I used to work in COBOL a lifetime ago; now I can barely manage my smart phone :) But I'll keep spreading the word about the site and watch it grow. Great fun :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

Now if only I had kept it up..... :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cephlin
Cephlin
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I read an interesting article on the BBC website the other day that says new scientific evidence suggests programmers have brains similar to that of multi lingual people.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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¡Felicidades, mi amiga! De acuerdo contigo con el subjuntivo...;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

Si, es muy frustrante. La conjugación no es el problema; es muy fácil de recordar. Pero cuándo usarlo...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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¡Sí, exactamente!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ViejitaKatalina

El subjuntivo es difícil en inglés!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChukyBlairBass

I can't believe you're understanding what Shakira sings, half Spain has no clue about what is she singing about when she sings in Spanish

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I go through the lyrics on paper, but I cannot follow along with her actual singing at all. It's really more of an excuse to listen to her music, although I have gotten a lot of practice with the subjunctive tense from it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

Have you played Lyrics Trainer? Just seconding PerroNegro's suggestion of Lyrics Trainer in Spanish - I do the french songs as that is what I am learning, but if you enjoy music it really is a great learning tool - a bit addictive though (but now that you've finished your tree, you have hours and hours to spare - right?? :) Have fun and well done!

PS Cute pooch !!

http://lyricstraining.com/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

That site looks really interesting and a unique concept. I'm not sure how often I'd be using it (since Shakira is somewhat low on my list of activities), but I'll definitely keep it in mind. I won't have quite as much time to devote as I have had over the last month (thankfully; I'm going stir-crazy), but I will be putting that on the list of things to do.

PS Thanks! She's awesome.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

Shakira isn't the only one singing Spanish - luckily!! There are lots of beautiful songs from other artists (about 300 Spanish ones all together I think) I try to do at least one song a day (in French) - only takes five minutes - along with all the other things we do that only take five minutes....... :) It helps with vocab and syntax and speaking the "everyday" way. You also get a peek into the culture with the words and the videos

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I'll have to look them up on that website then. I haven't really liked the majority of Spanish musicians I have listened to, but I haven't really looked hard enough. Maybe that website will have some singers that I like more.

I had gone through Shakira's "La Tortura" previously and I learned quite a bit of info about the culture and their sayings. Plus she almost exclusively used the subjunctive tense, another great way to learn that annoying thing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

I love this one, but unfortunately it isn't on Lyrics trainer. I have put the youtube link below. I don't know what style of music you like, but I think this is an older one which these two (she is Portuguese if I'm not mistaken) have redone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=flr8vDQ9Wuc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

My first favorite is Shakira, which sounds probably cliche, but she's always been one of my favorites for quite a few years now. So I figured that now I have an excuse to listen to her even more, under the guise of learning Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I can't believe I forgot to mention Juanes! He's actually my second favorite Spanish singer; I've listened to him on and off for years, even before really taking up Spanish study. He has really clear singing too, and I can understand a lot of words just from listening.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

And your first is ......?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4arthur
4arthur
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First off, congratulations! You've built a terrific foundation. I do have suggestions and these may repeat things you're already doing. Sorry if that's the case, but repetition never hurts! :)

  1. Read aloud at an "intentional" volume as much as possible. It helps one begin to believe that these sounds actually communicate thought. It also connects mind and tongue!
  2. Upload some articles to translate in subject areas that you know thoroughly. Translate them and read them aloud too. I've learned a lot of Spanish vocabulary specific to a complicated field of study that way. I know what the translation has to be before I start. That's more important than we often realize for any "translation." You do sometimes run into a dilemma: the Spanish facts can be wrong, so you're stuck translating errors. Still the language and vocabulary themselves are OK.
  3. Avoid ALL Wikipedia articles. They're awful. I can't believe most of the Spanish is well written and the facts are often wrong or confused. I have quit looking at anything uploaded from there.
  4. Find native speakers to talk to and warn them NOT to correct you all the time. Children learn by their mistakes. Adults think they have to be perfect (more perfect in fact that most native speakers). As with a child, just have the native speaker answer you with errors corrected. Little by little we pick up good grammar and a useful vocabulary.
  5. A good accent has a lot to do with your ear. I have a LOT of trouble getting a decent accent because I just don't hear the subtleties. There's nothing wrong with speaking with an accent if that's the best you can do. It's the way many foreigners speak English. We understand them well enough anyway. Spanish (like all languages) is a jumble of accents. You'll begin to sound most like the people you talk with.

That's my 37-cents worth! Don't scream and stomp around! Inflation is a fact of life. You can't expect advice to stay at two cents forever! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmeltonga
jmeltonga
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I have questioned myself how well the Wikipedia articles are written. Sounds like good advice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I love reading Spanish out loud. It helps with my not skipping over words (like I have a tendency to do when reading silently) and of course pronunciation.

That's a good idea about translating for specific subjects. I'm actually planning to (hopefully) use Spanish for my job, which is technical and very specific, so I could even get practice in for work that way.

I was translating a Wikipedia article the other day and it was so horrible. Even when I cheated a bit with Google Translate (just to see if it really was as butchered as I thought), it came out with near gibberish, so my English translation looked disasterous. So do you recommend with using Spanish news articles or short stories or something instead? I haven't run across anything in Immersion that hasn't been a Wikipedia article, so I'm not sure what else is available.

I'm going to also be working with a Spanish teacher (through italki) to help with conversations and real-world scenarios. I was planning on utilizing italki to find language partners but unfortunately I got swamped with entirely unwanted requests and turned out the partner search feature. So I think I'll go the teacher route instead.

I've been slowly getting better with a Castilian accent. It's been more of a tongue-twister than whatever accent I previously was learning, but reading out loud has definitely helped too. I also want to get a Spanish teacher from Spain so I can fine-tune the accent.

Thanks for all the advice. I'll definitely be using all that, especially with the translation advice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heqamaat
heqamaat
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Although wikipedia articles are the most common there's definitely other things out there. If you really can't find anything just upload something from a spanish news site or I like to use Ciudad seva to translate stories from authors I really like

PS: On that note, I think literature in general is just a great place to find complex Spanish. If you want suggestions for authors to read I'm a huge fan of Jorge Luis Borges and Julio Cortazar. Reading authors like that can be really challenging but you'll learn so much from the language they use (If you really want to cry Gabriel Garcia Marquez's early early works are kind of a mess and thus really difficult in my opinion - even in English!) Spanish literature is also a great source of short stories and novellas which is great for instant gratification of working through a story.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

Perfect! I really wanted to start getting into some Spanish literature (I found some free Spanish books for the Kindle that got good reviews but that's been it). I eventually do want to read Gabriel Garcia Marquez, but having an easier author or story to start with would be much more encouraging. I'll definitely look up those two authors though and add them to my book list.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heqamaat
heqamaat
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I hope you enjoy them!

And just curious but what books did you find? I never even though about using my kindle until reading this thread and it's sounds perfect for reading. One of the things I hate about reading actual book is it's kind of cumbersome to have to flip between the book and a dictionary or the internet to check things I don't understand : Another reason I like the immersion practice here too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I got Leyendas, La Biblia de los Caídos (this one is part of a series), and Apocalipsis 1a Entrega. There were a lot more free ones that I had found but these three looked most interesting and had gotten decent reviews for Kindle readability and actual content.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/4arthur
4arthur
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This is how I have found good articles in Spanish in my field of specialization. I take a famous name involved in the field or in the historical era and type "La vida de xxxxx" into my browser. Usually Wikipedia articles in Spanish are the first things to appear. That's fine because I can open one of those and, regardless of whether it's good or bad, find Spanish terms that enable me to start a more targeted search, which then leads to specialized articles, written by people who really know what they're talking about.

Once you upload a good article into DuoLingo, people who have no understanding of the subject may start "translating" with you. Sometimes even "correcting" you. I'm forgiving of that and I use it to teach them something about real translation. You can't translate, or even understand writings in your own language, unless you know the topic. It's never a matter of substituting a word in one language for one in another.

Yes, Wikipedia in Spanish is so horrible that I had begun to think they were Google translations of articles from the English Wikipedia. Not true. I've checked. The English articles are generally much more accurate, longer, and better written. The reverse would probably be true of articles of special interest to the Spanish-speaking world.

AND (stop me when you've had enough! :) speaking out loud with intention and with comprehension of what you're saying is crucial. As a young man I was taught both French and German in the old-style American way. I had five years of German and could read Goethe. Then I went to Vienna for a year and couldn't order dinner or get my clothes cleaned. I knew all the verb conjugations, noun declensions, vast vocabulary---and none of it was usable to me as a "real" spoken language.

THEN I needed Italian. I took one year of a University course taught audio-lingually. My fiery Italian teacher would say, at the top of her voice, "ad alta voce, Signor." We had to memorize dialogs and practically shout at her, but we began to trust that the sounds we made meant something. I have zero fear of speaking Italian. I still speak German haltingly and clumsily after five years, and my year in Austria. I have zero fluency in it.

Speaking sentences you know you will never use, is still important. You are building a sense for syntax and patterns of thought. Personally I'm not working on Castilian. My contacts are all Mexican and I have a few educated friends who speak that accent. Enough! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

Thanks for the help; I've already found a few articles that look promising to translate that I can get started on. I had a similar experience of never having to speak Spanish in my high school classes and I could barely piece together sentences, but once I started college courses which forced me to speak, I had a better foundation. And now after going through Duolingo and saying everything out loud, I can at least somewhat get my accent and fluidity down to where I don't sound completely inept. But good to know that speaking out loud really does help with developing fluency; I just figured I was speaking out loud because it was more fun for me and I could keep better focus.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ViejitaKatalina

Way to go! It sounds as though you had a decent base, though! I've been going through the tree fairly slowly. I took tons of (good!) Spanish classes in high school, including AP Spanish language and AP Spanish lit, and Spanish lit classes in Spanish in college -- but it still slipped away after years of disuse. I really appreciate your tips! I've been happily surprised at how it has come back.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I took three Spanish courses in college, which proved to be more useful than all my high school Spanish years combined. I wish I had kept up with it more, especially because I like the language, but fortunately I didn't forget everything I had learned (just most of it). Those Spanish lit classes sound very interesting though! I'm planning on reading Don Quijote in Spanish down the road, although it was quite challenging to get through in English. I'm glad my post could help you and good luck with your learning!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChukyBlairBass

Don Quijote is not an easy reading, even for Spanish native speakers (as me), but I suppose it depends of the version you're reading...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

It was a pretty challenging read in English too, so reading Don Quijote in Spanish is more of a bucket list accomplishment that I have no plans on starting any time soon.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bailey.Ruybal
Bailey.Ruybal
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Lucky duck! Good for you! I am currently on the time part of Spanish. I love testing it out! I would recommend trying to jump into a sink or swim type thing, and then see if you get better. If that doesn't work, Try reading in Spanish to yourself while another person reads in English out loud or vice versa. It has helped me learn new words and taught me pronunciations. That's probably not as helpful as I hope, I hope it helps a little at least. Best wishes para tu Español!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

Reading in Spanish has been very helpful so far. I actually have the Harry Potter books in English, so I've been reading that and the Spanish book side by side so I can get a contextual translation instead of guessing all the time. It's definitely been helpful for getting more vocabulary as well as seeing the differences between how you would say something in English versus how you would say it in Spanish. Thanks for the advice, and good luck in your tree!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marPW
marPW
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i think I'm in love. ¡Enhorabuena! Ahora te sugiero que busques un trabajo donde tengas que hablar en español. Ya así no te quedará de otra; a fuerzas tendras que usar el español. Suerte.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

¡Gracias! En realidad empecé aprender español nuevamente porque mi trabajo necesita un representante para Latinoamérica. ¡Entonces puedo conservar mi trabajo y uso español al mismo tiempo!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VStarTraveler
VStarTraveler
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Congratulations, and thanks for the excellent report.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/faizanhussain560

nice

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mercutio

you should be proud of your achievement, you are so far ahead of me its crazy! I have done the entire michel thomas foundation course and 50% of duolingo and am not even A1 level yet!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mercutio

to those using the paperwhite free books and press to translate dictionary does it work on iPad too?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

There is a Spanish dictionary on the iPad Kindle app but it's not Spanish-English. A translation dictionary would only work on a Paperwhite or Touch. Annoying, but I guess Amazon has to make sure we buy their Kindles for some reason.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lifebohemia

Congratulations on your achievements! I am watching Destinos now and I am loving it. What I like in particular is how they take you to different parts of the Spanish-speaking world: Mexico, Spain, Argentina, Puerto Rico. This really gives you a feel for the different word usages and accents of the speakers there. This was a big, unanticipated problem for me years ago. I lived in Mexico for over a year and then married someone from the Caribbean. What a difference in the way they speak and the words they use to describe things. Then, when I met someone from Cuba or Argentina, I thought I surely must have been fooling myself to think I ever knew Spanish at all :) I could hardly keep up. This one thing is so important. Best wishes and continued success in your endeavors to learn and speak the Spanish language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missamanthann

I'll definitely have to watch that series. I may end up traveling to South America at some point, and being able to understand different dialects would be extremely helpful. I've already found out that some words used in Spain mean extremely vulgar things in South America, which is good to find out in advance!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ExtraProtrusion2

hello

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PerroNegro

First I wanted to say thanks to 4arthur for the tip regarding "intentional" volume. I am always muttering to myself and I think I sound pretty good, but I notice a big difference when I try to speak aloud at a conversational volume. Somehow my tongue gets more tangled!

The second thing I wanted to mention was another resource you may not know about missamanthann and that is a translation site called lingro. How it work is you go first to their site and then open any webpage through their portal. Every word on that page then becomes clickable for a definition. If you have registered, the site then saves a list of the words you have looked up with the original context in which you saw it (very helpful) and then build decks for you. There is also something about games, but I haven't checked it out. Their home page says 11 languages are supported (among them I noticed Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Russian, and Italian). I use it to read elmundo.es

4 years ago