"Ein Junge ist ein Kind."

Translation:A boy is a child.

April 14, 2013

18 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/giulisil

The translation is easy, but the sentence makes no sense to me.

October 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/zezhyrule

A boy is a child. A tiger is a cat. A church is a building.

October 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Lry1987

It make sence in my mind.lol

September 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/shoe_lace104

So for a girl/woman its "eine", but for a boy/man its "ein"?

November 6, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jobyta24

Yes.

June 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/TheLynx88

Yet the test want's you to write "Ein Mädchen". (A girl)

June 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Katherle
  • 25
  • 22
  • 12
  • 3

In the nominative case (= for the subject and after the verbs "sein" (to be) and "werden" (to become)), it's

der (the) and ein (a/an) for masculine nouns

die (the) and eine (a/an) for feminine nouns

das (the) and ein (a/an) for neuter nouns

Mostly, the gender of nouns is arbitrary and has to be learnt by heart. For example, "der Löffel" (the spoon) is masculine, "die Gabel" (the fork) is feminine and "das Messer" (the knife) is neuter.

However, with people, the grammatical gender normally coincides with the biological gender: "der Mann" (the man) and "der Junge" (the boy) are masculine, and "die Frau" (the woman) is feminine, etc. A notable exception is "das Mädchen" (the girl), which is neuter (!) and not feminine. The reason for this is that it ends in the suffix -chen, which literally means "little" ("Mädchen" originally meant "little maid/woman"). All nouns ending in the suffix -chen are neuter, that's why "Mädchen" is neuter as well.

June 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/kijana.rob

Do German D's sounds like T's

March 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Katherle
  • 25
  • 22
  • 12
  • 3

Well spotted :). Yes, at the end of a word a "d" is pronounced as a "t", i.e. "Kind" is actually pronounced as "Kint". See:

http://joycep.myweb.port.ac.uk/pronounce/consond.html

The same applies to other consonants such as "b" or "g", which are pronounced as "p" and "k" at the end of a word. This devoicing of the final consonant is also a stereotypical feature of a German accent in English, BTW.

March 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisgiovent

I like how they threw this as a curve ball. "Ein" is "a/one" (masculine/neuter) and "der" is "the" (masculine). What throws me off a bit are the articles. If I were to change the indefinite articles (a/an) to definite (the), would it be, "Der Junge ist das Kind" (The boy is the child)?

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Katherle
  • 25
  • 22
  • 12
  • 3

Yes, "The boy is the child" would be "Der Junge ist das Kind".

In the nominative case, i.e. for the subject and after the verbs "sein" (to be) and "werden" (to become),

A/an = ein (masculine and neuter), eine (feminine)

The = der (masculine), das (neuter), die (feminine and plural)

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/rbarraza333

The pronunciation of the letter d is supposed to sound like an english t?

July 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Katherle
  • 25
  • 22
  • 12
  • 3

Yes, as I said above, at the end of a word a "d" is pronounced as a "t", i.e. "Kind" is actually pronounced as "Kint". See:

http://joycep.myweb.port.ac.uk/pronounce/consond.html

The same applies to other consonants such as "b", which is pronounced as "p" at the end of a word.

July 21, 2014
Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.