"Eu quero outra maçã."

Translation:I want another apple.

5 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/srshti
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Could this also mean "I want a different apple"? As in, "other" = "different".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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I think it's better to maintain "another" because it may mean 2 things: "I want a differente apple" but also "I want one more apple". As we dont know what the intention was, it's better to be more literal.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/srshti
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Ah, okay. So, in context it could mean "I want a different apple" as well.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vam1980
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Is there a significant reason why the article 'uma' is omitted here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/liofla
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I'm wondering as well. I would have expected "eu quero uma outra maçã". I wonder why it can be dropped here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique
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As well as in Spanish, "indefinite article + outro/a" does not sound good.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesMacDo7

is there a difference between eu quero outra maçã and eu quero mais uma maçã?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PabloB.1
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Hi,

Yes, there is.

"Eu quero outra maçã" means I want another apple. If I hear that I would understand that into two ways: (01) you have an apple with you and you want to change it for another for some reason. Because it is rotten, for instance. Or (02) you have an apple with you and you want one more. So you will have two of them.

"Eu quero mais uma maçã" have one straight meaning: you want one more apple. You ate one of it, it was delicious and now you want one more.

2 years ago
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