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"I am thirsty."

Translation:Ich habe Durst.

April 14, 2013

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melyindoodle

Which is used more often? "Ich bin durstig" or "Ich habe Durst?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ro_ha86

I come across "Ich habe Durst" much more often than "Ich bin durstig"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanessaMat

The only CORRECT way is "Ich habe Durst" a native would cringe if you used "bin" in this context with this kind of verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rzim005

If I wanted to tell someone I was thirsty, I would say Ich habe Durst/I have thirst. If someone told me to translate 'I am thirsty' I would say 'Ich bin durstig'/I am thirsty. It's interesting how German arranges words in this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoonlightXOXO

Why is Durst with a capital letter? Is it a noun in this context? Please explain! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maxwrobinson

My understanding is that nouns get capitalized.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maxwrobinson

And in this case "thirsty" is a noun because it literally translates to "I have thirst".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/draugurinn

It's because "Ich habe Durst" means *"I have thirst".

So, Durst = *Thirst durstig = thirsty


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahin840485

However we were asked to chose option for "i am thirsty" and not "i have thirst" Isn't "ich bin durst" translated "i am thirsty"? Please explain!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vabelie

No, read again.

"Der Durst" is "the thirst".
So "ich bin Durst" translates to the non-sensical "I am thirst".

"I am thirsty" would literally be "ich bin durstig".

But the fact is that while English speakers do say "I am thirsty", German speakers (and lots of others, for instance the French), say "I have thirst".

Different people, different habits. If you try to translate word for word, or bring things typical from language to another, you'll never sound natural, nor really understand others.

Viel Glück!

sfuspvwf npj


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Will_Edwards

I know in French, for example you have thirst and hunger. I think English might be unique in being thristy or hungry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ROHITCHOUD16

when to use "bin" and "habe" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itsme_dafni

"Bin" is am in German and "Habe" is have


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexCobb

So this is like spanish, yes? "Yo tengo sed" "Ich habe Durst"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/monypm

In spanish you can also say "Estoy sediento", which would translate to I'm thirsty. Then again, "Tengo sed" is a lot more common and "sediento" can imply being parched as opposed to simply being thirsty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onur606860

Is there any such thing as "Ich habe Durst gehabt?". Or which is the correct wasy to say it in Perfekt? Ich war durstig sounds ok in Präteritum but ich habe Durst gehabt sounds a bit awkward right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/loui62015

Wouldnt it be ich bin durst


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angie590321

Why worry? In German you can use BOTH: Ich bin durstig. / Ich bin hungrig. OR Ich habe Durst. / Ich habe Hunger.

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