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  5. "Always take off your slipper…

"Always take off your slippers when you enter the house."

Translation:Wehe i ke kalipa i nā manawa a pau ke komo i ka hale.

June 12, 2019

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Why no "e" before "wehe"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

It is kind of a command but not really. So the word e is not needed. it is like a generality.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/villajidiot

Sort of like "One takes off one's slippers when one enters the house."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oceanic2

"E wehe mau i kou kalipa ke komo i ka hale". Can eh? what you think? But duolingo isn't allowing it at this time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

mau means forever instead of always like all the time. i nā manawa a pau fits better for that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Your suggestion for using mau unfortunately implies something else. Mau a mau means "forever and ever."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamakea1

"E wehe mau i kou kalipa ke komo i ka hale". = Keep taking off your slippers when you come inside the house.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarbaraLea954887

Will pidgeon English be offered as a language to study? I find translation between English and Hawaiian word order is difficult. I undetstand I could translate easier between pidgeon English and 'olelo Hawai'i.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

You mean Pidgin English, I think, or more specifically Hawaiian Pidgin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

I wish someone would, but pidgin is not a genuine language. It is an English creole dialect. Beyond a simple phrase, I will not even try it myself (in public) because my pidgin is horrible. And the locals can spot a fake a mile away.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Wow, I got a down-arrow for saying pidgin is not a genuine language? This is a tough crowd. If pidgin is a genuine language, then half the locals are bilingual and all government documents should be written in pidgin. A large percentage of the population uses it every day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

I always say my kids are bilingual because they have, indeed, learned proper English in addition to the pidgin they grew up with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

As welll as Rap fans - we all miss him!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

If Pidgin is not a pidgin, but rather a creole, as you say, then it is a language, and government documents could certainly be written in it. You are probably right that native speakers can spot a fake a mile off, but you may be surprised to learn that native speakers of English, French, Spanish, Swedish, Japanese, etc can also spot what you would call a fake (I would call such a person a student) a mile off.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Sorry. Allow me to clarify my statement. I am a native speaker of American English. I have been an Islander and a Mainlander. My Hawaiian Pidgin English accent is poor, as is my British English accent. If I speak in pidgin with my cousins, they know I am faking it because the accent is not pure. We use the same basic grammatical structure and almost all the same vocabulary. In Hawaiian pidgin, one might say "You come from the store just now?" Or "You wen come from da store just now?" An exact standard American English translation would be "Did you come from the store just now?" The substitution of a few words does not an independent language make.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

But pidgin has specific grammar rules, so it should be possible to teach it as a language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MacKinzieRob

Wich one? Pilipino Pidgin? Kepanī Pidgin? Portagee? Pidgin? Pake Pidgin? They are all different


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

So, "always" = each? " Always = every? And the timing doesn't necessarily come last? And is "take off slippers" just a suggestion, not a command? What makes it a request?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

1st question for always- see my reply to Stephanos above. Does that answer your question? 2nd question - the timing phrase is at the end of the main part of the sentence because that is what you need to do always. 3rd question - There is no command marker E. It is said as using a general tense. That makes it a soft command or suggestion. Is all that clear?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

Yeah, I just need to study more and learn better all the things that currently confuse me. Mahalo nui no kou mana`o kokua.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarinLynn1

Kelii, I would give you a lingot for this great reply except I am on my cell phone and I guess I can't give lingots if I'm not on my laptop!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

Where did the "i nā manawa a pau" come in? There's no mention of "every time" or even "whenever" - just "when" - could be Don't forget to do that this time because my Mom's really picky. A pau is not something I would just assume to be implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

Always has two meanings - always meaning forever (a mau loa or mau a mau usually) and always meaning all the time, like My son always asks to go to the beach. That is the phrase i nā manawa a pau.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BethKing-M

Makes sense if you don't think in terms of Always. Mahalo for that reference - I'd gotten lost in my own thinking circle and convinced myself that I'd read it to mean just right now. Totally the opposite of the "Always" term. I need to stop working on my DuoLingo at night when I'm too sleepy to think!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamOhuGon

Kalipa is slipper, so slippers should be nā kalipa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rabelon

Sure. Technically that is correct, especially if you see a box full of them. Think of grass and hair when you have them cut. Slippa is that sort of singular\plural kind of thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickBra289091

Wehe (i) ke kalipa (i) nā manawa a pau ke komo (i) ka hale.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

The word i is an object marker and is usually needed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Talmerian

Why is this slippers? Wouldn't I take off my shoes/sneakers/boots before entering and put on slippers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

Please see my response to your other comment on the other post - they are using English that is specific to Hawai‘i. In this sentence, the word slippers refers to what everyone else calls flip-flops. No one says flip-flops in Hawai‘i. Plus, nobody wears actual slippers inside their homes in Hawai‘i, it is barefoot only.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike421411

Where is the possessive?

I.e. "your"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kelii....

It's implied. When taking off clothes/footwear, it would implicitly be the ones you're wearing. So the possessive is dropped. You can add it if you want - kou instead of ka.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike421411

Something is wrong with this particular set of questions. I am not able to select the top one no matter how many times I touch it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kamakea1

Since there are 2 'awe and 3 possible locations, there should be 6 possible correct combinations based only on changing 'awe positions.
e wehe vs. wehe, ke kalipa vs. kou kalipa vs kou mau kalipa will further multiply the number of possibilities. All of the following correct sentences were marked wrong:

E wehe kalipa i nā manawa a pau, ke komo i ka hale.
E wehe kalipa ke komo i ka hale i nā manawa a pau.
Wehe kalipa i nā manawa a pau ke komo i ka hale.
I nā manawa a pau, ke komo i loko o ka hale, e wehe i ke kalipa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

I had not accounted for the compound verb "wehe kalipa" for this exercise before. It has been added now.

There's a lot of variation possible for this one, as you've noticed :)

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