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"The dawn of tomorrow"

Translation:A madrugada de amanhã

April 15, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/monjohn

Why does amanha not require an article?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

General rule: of/from = de, of the/from the = do, dos, da, das. (You may find some exceptions).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nomism

Why de and not da? Really struggling with this. Why doesn't this require the contraction of de and a .... isn't amanha fem?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

No. "amanhâ" is masculine. But the "the" is not required in every instance. In this case, it is not used both in English and in Portuguese.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djeidot

"amanhã" in this context is an adverb, not a noun, and adverbs don't require an article. Just like "tomorrow" in English doesn't need a "the".

There are a few specific situations, however, when "amanhã" is used as a noun, like the one @Paulenrique mentioned.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

We dont use article before "amanhã" unless you get it too specific or view it in a separate way (o amanhã ninguém sabe = what tomorrow will be like nobody knows)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Medion87

Wich word decide to use "do" or "de" in a portugese sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

General rule: of/from = de, of the/from the = do, dos, da, das. (You may find some exceptions).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aerodi

This phrase (native spanish speaker) does not make much sense to me. Madrugada isn´t exactly "dawn" in spanish, it is amanecer. Are "madrugada" and "amanhecer" the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Madrugada is the "darkest/latter part of the night" that comes before the amanhecer, the beginning of the day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThanKwee

The closest thing we have in English for "madrugada" is "the wee hours", "the small hours", or "the wee small hours" http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/wee_hours


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scutigera

And, "middle of the night" or "dead of night" for hours after midnight to about 4am (04h00):

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/in+the+dead+of+night


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lebanmyint

A madrugada da amanha?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

No, not right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flowersmanshon

Ok, this was a a poor translation at best. Iv'e always heard, and used madrugado to mean in the wee hours of the morning, never dawn, which means coming up of the sun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PabloB.1

Hi,

Correct.

Dawn means "amanhecer" in Portuguese. It is used when daylight shows up.

We use "madrugada" when night ends but sun has not showed up yet. It is used after 1 a.m. until daylight shows up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skybanner

Could "raiar do dia" be used for "dawn" in this context? As in, "A raiar do dia de amanhã."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

Michaelis dictionary:

rai·ar

vtd e vint 1 Emitir raios luminosos; brilhar, irradiar: A lâmpada raiava uma suave claridade. As primeiras estrelas já raiam no firmamento.

vint 2 Despontar ou surgir no horizonte; começar a aparecer; nascer: “Passei a noite em claro, caminhando por aí […] Quando o dia raiou, fiquei olhando o rio e pensando umas bobagens” (EV).

vint 3 FIG Vir a ser; aparecer, chegar, surgir: “Há anos raiou no céu fluminense uma nova estrela […] Tinha ela dezoito anos quando apareceu a primeira vez na sociedade” (SEN).

So, yes, "raiar" can also be used to mean "dawn": "O raiar de amanhã".

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