Duolingo è lo strumento più diffuso al mondo per l'apprendimento delle lingue. E ancora meglio, è gratis al 100%!

"Do not call me today, call me tomorrow."

Traduzione:Non chiamarmi oggi, chiamami domani.

4 anni fa

12 commenti


https://www.duolingo.com/tpamm
tpamm
  • 25
  • 25
  • 12
  • 10
  • 4

perche non chiamaRmi oggi, ma chiachiaMi domani?

2 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/graficosat

Ma sto studiando l'infinito, cosa c'entra il futuro? o sto facendo confusione?

4 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/cavana

Hi graficosat ... nella frase non c'è il tempo futuro; il verbo "to call" è coniugato nelle due frasi al modo imperativo esortativo. Nota che non è espresso il soggetto "YOU = tu" - Bye!

4 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/eliocaione
eliocaione
  • 25
  • 12
  • 4
  • 174

Se va bene "NON CHIAMARMI ...", perché non va bene "NON TELEFONARMI ..." come scritto da me, corretto con "NON MI TELEFONARE ...:? Grazie

4 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/jeffrey.eggers
jeffrey.eggers
  • 25
  • 18
  • 11
  • 8
  • 1444

Non è corretto "...mi chiama domani"?

2 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankieSMPE

la frase è giusta,non so' perchè me la segna sbagliata

2 anni fa

https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw
roselaw
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 24
  • 21
  • 18
  • 1816

Why does this have to be in the infinitive (chiamarmi) rather than mi chiama? Also, why does it say chiamarmi once but then chiamami the second time? Thanks!

1 anno fa

https://www.duolingo.com/jeffrey.eggers
jeffrey.eggers
  • 25
  • 18
  • 11
  • 8
  • 1444

Roselaw, since your question was six months ago, I assume you already have the answer, but for the benefit of others I'll answer anyway. : )

The first half of the sentence is a negative imperative which uses the infinitive. The second half is a positive imperative so it uses the appropriate imperative conjugation. So you could write the sentence like this:

Non mi chiamare oggi, mi chiama domani.

When they instead attach the clitic "mi" to the verbs, you end up with the one little r being the only difference in spelling. Cheers.

11 mesi fa

https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw
roselaw
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 24
  • 21
  • 18
  • 1816

Nope I've been wandering in the wilderness about this all this time. :-) Many thanks for your response. So if I'm understanding you correctly, negative imperatives take the infinitive but positive imperatives do not. That is so very weird! Do I have that right and, if so, do you have any idea why that is?

11 mesi fa

https://www.duolingo.com/jeffrey.eggers
jeffrey.eggers
  • 25
  • 18
  • 11
  • 8
  • 1444

You have it right, BUT it gets weirder. You use the infinitive only for negative imperatives that are second person singular (tu). For all others, including the polite form Lei, you use the normal imperative conjugation. For example: (Tu) Aspetta! (Tu) Non aspettare! (Lei) Aspetti! (Lei) Non aspetti! (Noi) Aspettiamo! (Noi) Non aspettiamo!

They apparently often use the clitic form with imperatives: Aspettami! Non aspettarmi!

I learned it from a grammar book (they never explained why), but I found a website that explains it reasonably well: https://www.lifeinitaly.com/italian/imperative-tense-italian

11 mesi fa

https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw
roselaw
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 24
  • 21
  • 18
  • 1816

Oh for crying out loud! I know that as an English-speaker (English being an almost completely irrational language) I shouldn't criticize others, but still. Anyhow thanks so much for this, and I think I can actually commit it to memory.

11 mesi fa

https://www.duolingo.com/Tata971267

È una questione di posizione del pronome!

1 mese fa