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  5. "You don't like (it)."

"You don't like (it)."

Translation:ʻAʻole ʻoe makemake.

June 27, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlockedBlock

Why does ʻoe come before makemake here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Negation

ʻAʻole

If a sentence that is negated using ʻaʻole has a pronoun (ʻo ia, ʻoe, au, kāua, kākou, etc.) as its subject, then that pronoun moves up in the sentence, so that it comes right after ʻaʻole.

Ex. Makemake au i ka ʻīlio ➜ Negation: ʻAʻole au makemake i ka ʻīlio.

Otherwise, the order stays the same as usual.

Ex. Makemake ʻo Kaleo i ka ʻīlio ➜ Negation: ʻAʻole makemake ʻo Kaleo i ka ʻīlio.

Ex. Makemake ke keiki i ka ʻīlio ➜ Negation: ʻAʻole makemake ke keiki i ka ʻīlio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Circlejour

I noticed in some of the other questions, "ka po'e" goes at the end ('a'ole makemake ka po'e, i.e. the people don't want it). Why is it different? Or was there an error?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Usually the subject will follow "makemake".

The exception is a negation sentence (ʻaʻole) with a pronoun as the subject. If a sentence that is negated using ʻaʻole has a pronoun (ʻo ia, ʻoe, au, kāua, kākou, etc.) as its subject, then that pronoun moves up in the sentence, so that it comes right after ʻaʻole.

Ex. Makemake au i ka ʻīlio ➜ Negation: ʻAʻole au makemake i ka ʻīlio.

Otherwise, the order stays the same as usual.

Ex. Makemake ka poʻe ➜ Negation: ʻAʻole makemake ka poʻe.

Ex. Makemake ʻo Kaleo i ka ʻīlio ➜ Negation: ʻAʻole makemake ʻo Kaleo i ka ʻīlio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryBisaga

Nice explanation! I had such a hard time in Nā Kai ʻEwalu with all the different negation options. Sometimes I wonder if usage of English grammatical terminology like yours might make things easier on us poor haoles.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaginEvet

Super, thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamOhuGon

The phrase: ʻAʻole makemake ʻoe iā ia should be correct, but is marked incorrect. The stative verb makemake can be placed either before or after the subject. More flexibility is needed in this lesson, offering the alternative ʻAʻole ʻoe makemake


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaginEvet

Are you native speaker?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maui_Bartlett

Aloha e Kumu ʻOhu! I have heard native speakers use ʻAʻole without the pronoun pulled forward, and I would certainly never tell them that they were wrong. I tend to agree that it would be appropriate for those kinds of orderings to be accepted on Duolingo as well. My only worry is that the inconsistency could be confusing for learners. I will discuss this with our team.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaryBisaga

Interesting. It's a hard question, isn't it, what native speakers might use vs what's technically "correct"? As Native English speakers we use double negatives all the time, but we don't teach second language learners they can do it freely. I was wondering whether you are planning on having language notes with the lessons as many other languages have here. That might be a good place to explain the difference.

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