1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Arabic
  4. >
  5. "مَلِكة عَرَبِيّة"

"مَلِكة عَرَبِيّة"

Translation:an Arab queen

June 28, 2019

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hvsultan

Why malikatun (malika)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BaSsGaz

-un is used for the nominative case;

Learn more : Tanwin (final postnasalized or long vowels)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArabicFrench

Isn't "malika" the same as "malikatun"? Both are correct, the difference is that the first one is more frequently pronounced orally, while the second one is a written form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicDQ8

I originally wrote Arabian instead of Arab on this and it was marked incorrect. In this case in English Arabian is fine and should be accepted - not marked as incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caden195835

Can I also say: "an Arabian queen?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aro_Sensei

'Arabian' is specific to the Arabian peninsula.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Strugatsky

Can you provide a reference for this? I have never known a distinction between Arab and Arabian as adjectives. None of the dictionaries I have in my collection support this distinction.

The Shorter Oxford Dictionary gives Arab as (n) "a native of Arabia"; adj "of or pertaining to Arabia or the Arabs", and Arabian as (adj) "belonging to Arabia".

The Heinemann Australian Dictionary considers Arab to be the noun and gives Arabian as an adjective form of Arab, which is how I have always used both words.

Most of my dictionaries are fairly old, but a short search online found: "As adjectives, the New Oxford American Dictionary defines Arabic a related to the language or the literature, while Arab is the more generic term (“of or relating to Arabia and the people of Arabia”) and Arabian is a historical variant of Arab."

So for the purposes of this question, someone who translated malikah 3arabiyyah as An Arabian Queen should not be marked down as not understanding the Arabic text. This would seem to me to be a perfectly correct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beerzoe

'Arabian' used to be much more widely-used than it is now - my variety of English (British) uses it exclusively about horses or the collection of stories 'Arabian Nights'. It sounds odd applied to a person: https://brians.wsu.edu/2016/05/17/arab-arabic-arabian/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aro_Sensei

Yes it's used to describe things not people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaizalZahid

Rania, is that your real identity?

Queen Rania of Jordan

~Vir pius sacrificat~


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yassin167640

An Arab queen?! Something I thought I would never utter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MamaLloyd

Perhaps the Queen of Sheba (that was "Saba", now Yemen).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rumactree

If your name was Mallika (an Indian given name), could this mean “Mallika is an Arab”? Or not quite?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rahma940437

ليش اجابتي خطأ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tahere4802

Why don't we learn new words?

Learn Arabic in just 5 minutes a day. For free.