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"No tengo la clave para abrir la puerta."

Translation:I do not have the code to open the door.

4 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/4sily
4sily
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Are "la clave" and "la llave" interchangeable and used within the same contexts?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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I'm not native here, but my guess and understanding is that "clave" is used more like a non physical key, more like a password, code, keypad code (like a PIN number) or an idea, a key to a puzzle so to speak. while "llave" is more of a physical item, a key that you hold in your hand and put into a lock to unlock a door, which is why it gives "code" as the translation in this sentence and in the last one I had it accepted "key" as the translation.

so, if I am correct (and if I'm not can someone please correct me?..) tú puedes tienes la clave al corazon de su novia o novio pero no puedes tienes la llave a su corazon

I hope that helps.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanCellerOBryan

You're right about clave vs llave, but you should say tú puedes tener..., of course. Also, in the case of 'key to s.o.'s heart', it's a metaphor for a real key, not like a secret or a code, so I would say llave (I know, that's got to be confusing).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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gracias a ti por tu repuesta. after 4 more months I am getting better at using the proper conjugation of verbs, but I still have more than my share of errors.. that is confusing, and perhaps it could go both ways..? because while it is often meant purely as a metaphor for a real key, it can also be a secret to their affection, por ejemplo, often times people say that "the way to a mans heart is through his stomach" having that knowledge would seem like a "key" that was more of a secret than solo a metaphor.. pero, no sé..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanCellerOBryan

De nada! :) I see what you mean, but I think the idea behind the phrase 'key to one's heart' is one of unlocking and not decoding or a password (it's always made me think of the 'keys to the city', but that may simply be me). In any case, I've only ever heard 'la llave de mi corazón' in Spanish (there's actually a fairly popular song by that title, by the way), so I'd say that's the one to go with.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
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you do have a good point there and that is a good example.

I suppose with that knowledge then if one were to use 'clave' it would produce a different type of feel to the whole metaphor (like how saying "estoy enfermo" means that you are sick but saying "soy enfermo" means something more to the extent that you are a sickly person, or prone to getting sick.. or at least that's how I have been made to understand it..) , although at the moment I'm a bit lacking as to what the new meaning would be.. like some twisted inside joke on words or something.. hehe isn't it fun to puzzle over what changes you can make in a metaphor by using words that very slightly from those words in the original language you learned the metaphor in?.. or learning metaphors that mean the same thing as others that you know but take a whole new twist and give a new outlook on the situation?

anyway, enough rambling. now I have to go look up that song, so thank you for that also (=

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phrontistery
Phrontistery
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You're correct; you would say "la llave" meaning "the key" to someone's heart.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barry_boettger

Just to confuse the issue .... I was sitting in a restaurant in Mexico a few years ago when a worker came in and asked us if we had seen the "llave". We couldn't help him... but he eventually spotted it.... a crescent wrench.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phrontistery
Phrontistery
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"Hey, whatever happened to the blind man selling his hammer and saw?" Someone answers in Spanish..."Oh, él ya ve" (Oh, he already sees) "YA VE!" sounds just like llave. lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom968478

I believe that one spanish name for a crescent wrench is English Key

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dumbass1971

We learned codigo a while back for code....now it's clave?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sihayanami
sihayanami
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"Código" and "clave" can be interchangeable, but only when talking about things like Morse code or a secret code. "Código" is also used to mean law or rule (Source: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=codigo ). "Clave" is more along the lines of password or passcode-- though I was too chicken to try either. It also can mean key, but only as a metaphor and never the actual metal kind-- though look how close it is to that word, llave. (Source: http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=clave )

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaydenCoop1

i have my phone set to spanish and when I enter my pass word it says "codigo" though, shouldn't it say clave?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GranBocadillo
GranBocadillo
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Shouln't d it be "No tengo la llave para abrir la puerta" ? If it shouldn't, then why?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andru1485
Andru1485
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I haven't and I have not both mean the same. Why isn't it, sorry, why is not it accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Both "I have not the key," and "Why is not it accepted?" are incorrect for modern English. "Not" binds tightly to its right. (Actually, "no" is kinda similar in Spanish. When it modifies a verb, it always precedes the verb closely; I think the only things that can come between are the clitic pronouns, which a lot of scholars don't even think properly qualify as words -- they're actually a special form of inflection.)

Putting the negative after "have" is kind of incoherent. It sounds a little like you're saying like you have something that is not the key, maybe? But it's not really a grammatical way to say that, either.

As for "Why is not it accepted?", again, that sounds like a gramattically-incompetent way of asking, "Why is {anything that is not it} accepted?" You want to ask, "Why is it {not accepted}?"

The form "[verb] not" to mean "do not [verb]" has been pretty much dead for decades, if not centuries. (We spoke not of such petty things. Tell me not that thou lovest another! Etc. Appropriate if you want to sound like a refugee from the 17th century. Or maybe a nostalgic fuddy-duddy from the 19th.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

What exactly did you write?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andru1485
Andru1485
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I wrote, 'I haven't the code to open the door'. It was marked incorrect and the correct answer I was given was 'I HAVE NOT the code to open the door'. I would accept 'I do not have' but not 'I have not...' So why is not it accepted? (Now I sound like a meerkat).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

IMO "I have not the key" is an unusual way of saying it in USA English. "I have not...." usually precedes an undone activity (I have not run across the street) rather than a lack of possession of something, and the Duo system can be finicky.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe2068

You are correct. It is uncommon, bordering on incorrect. "I have not the key" sounds like it came from some olde English or Shakespearian text. "I haven't the key" is no better.

The correct way in modern (US) English would be either, "I do not have the key" or "I don't have the key."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andru1485
Andru1485
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I agree. Using "I have not" instead of "I haven't" when it precedes an undone activity adds extra emphasis and clarity to the phrase. E.g. I have NOT been well at all, or, I have NOT eaten your slice of cake. It almost sounds defensive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robertdforrest

if "i have no key to open the door" is incorrect then I don't think this program is allowing enough latitude in determining an acceptable answer; either that or the use of clave as "key" elsewhere within the program is inconsistent.

(... and the note "Stop the clutter! Please do not report mistakes here and read the comments below before posting" isn't very generous in spirit. At best, the tone is offputting. Touché duolingo).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/speising
speising
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i just thought this too, but then i realized that that would probably be "no tengo no clave..."

"no tengo la clave...." requires the definite article in english too, for a direct translation.

It's a subtle semantic difference.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

If the infinitive can also be in the -ing form, could this also be translated as "I don't have the key for opening the door." Thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sarabulic
sarabulic
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La palabra espanola "llave" proviene del latin "clavis" , entonces deberian tener el mismo significado ...no soy un nativo, pero supongo que la palabra " clave " en espanol significa lo mismo que "code" en ingles, mientras que la llave es lo que abre la puerta! Espero que esto os ayude :)

P.s. Muchos otros idiomas tienen la palabra " llave " que parece mucho al latin "clavis". Por ejemplo : Italiano : Chiave Portugues : Chave Catalan : Clau Frances : Cle Rumano : Cheie Almost all slavic languages : Klyuch English : Key

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1beppe
1beppe
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perfettamente d'accordo: usually we don't need a "code" to open a door

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott31461
Scott31461
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Why does “para” need to be used when “abrir“ translates as "to open". Can’t you say, “No tengo la clave abrir la puerta.”?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hg3UVt
hg3UVt
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I answered "I don't have the key for the door" which was corrected to "I don't have the key to open the door". Well, yes, but, the key doesn't open the door, the key unlocks the door, then you open the door so, what is wrong with my answer? They aren't looking for literal translations unless they suddenly decide that they are!! Upon closer analysis we find that the sentence has built-in mistakes that we must accept but its completely one-sided!! They say the key opens the door, which is false, then they insist I do nothing to avoid the error and clean up their sentence, which I did. Are we trying to learn Spanish here or just fool around! Anyways, I thought I would share this, for some reason!

10 months ago