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https://www.duolingo.com/Mythdefied

This really isn't working for me

Up until now Duolingo and I have gotten along famously. But, up until now, we've been working with verbs I learned the conjugations for 15-20 years ago. Now that I'm in the first verb section of the Duolingo tree, I've come to a grinding halt. The way Duolingo tries to teach it is falling absolutely flat for me. After a full week of trying and failing every single time, I have to accept that I just can't look at random various conjugations and absorb them; I need structure or I don't remember it at all. So, unfortunately, I'm going to have to take a break from learning new things here and go back to learning verbs the old way, one verb, conjugated over and over for every pronoun, until all the conjugations are engraved into my memory. It's just not going to work any other way. I'll keep up with my old vocabulary on Duolingo, but until I've learned the new verbs, I just can't make any progress.

Anyone else from the old school of rote memorization encountering the same road blocks?

4 years ago

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/alphabeta
alphabeta
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Verbs follow patterns in conjugating. I haven't found Duolingo to often test "nasty" verbs, mostly just regular verbs. If you know how to conjugate parler, you already know how to conjugate most other -er verbs. Learn the patterns, not each verb in isolation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/enichts
enichtsPlus
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Have you tried using an online dictionary in combination with Duolingo? I keep a browser open just for this. When I see new verbs I review all of the conjugations, plus get to see variations and idioms. That said, I prefer DuoLingo to rote memorization.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SongbirdSandra

You can do it "old-school" with online flashcards; I use Anki.
http://ankisrs.net/

I enter the infinitive and conjugations on one side of card; the definition on the other side, like so:

Side 1:
            Aimer
J'aime          Nous aimons
Tu aimes      Vous aimez
Il aime          Ils aiment

Side 2:
To like; to love

Alternatively, you could write them down as you learn them. That is what I did at first (the first 125 verbs), but that became monotonous time-consuming (so glad I started using Anki!).

Here are verb-conjugators, if you need one (sometimes french.about.com doesn't have a particular verb):
http://french.about.com/library/verb/bl-verbconjugator.htm
http://www.conjugaison.com/

I also *highly recommend this youtube channel to anyone reading this (extremely helpful):
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHIwLdoUz4FRNyfjyz_G-Kg
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFB018F35E247EB0F

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tommg
tommg
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I think it's even more effective to create seperate cards for every case (for example Front: 'AIMER, present indicative, S/1' or 'AIMER, present indicative, je' Back: 'j'aime'), because that's the type of recall you have to perform in real life and this way the correct form pops into your head instantly instead of the whole sequence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CesarPitru
CesarPitru
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Yes! I Use memrise.com because it's so easy to create a course, And I just add every phrase that make me lose a heart, then I study them in memrise and come back tu duo with all those phrases mastered and it's just too easy after it.

here's my personal course http://www.memrise.com/course/330121/duolingo-20/ I just started but i can notice that it's the end of my struggle

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iustitia
iustitia
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I really like https://conjuguemos.com/ - you can practice those verbs you want, in tense you want, with pronouns you want. And to be honest Duolingo is not enough for conjugation. There are tons of irregular verbs multiply by tenses, so that is definitely worth working on.

I try to mix my learning and do some refreshment of verbs regularly.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mythdefied

This is...awesome. How did I not know about this? This is an amazing site. Thank you so very much!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vphilipsberg
vphilipsberg
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I like to use www.verbix.com and www.conjuguemos.com for help with verb conjugations. Also, sometimes in a duolingo lesson (but not all the time and I wish I knew why), when you hover over a verb it'll have a blue "c" button next to it and you can use that to bring up a table of all the conjugations.

Out of curiosity, are you having trouble mostly with regular verbs, or irregular ones? If you can discern the infinitive, usually you can follow the general rules for that verb ending.

What trips me up here is mostly that (correct me if I'm wrong) it doesn't look like the sections are divided up by verb ending or regular/irregular at all. Does anybody know if there is a reason for this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbvjshqk017

Get a basic french grammar book, no matter what ppl say about learning grammar, tried and proven old school grammar learning would definitely shine when it comes to well structured, easy-to-understand grammar lessons.

I assume you've already figured out that DL is not be the best place for grammar lessons. Just try old shool method once, I asssure you it will be much easier that way, too.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SongbirdSandra

I agree. I went to my local public library and checked out a grammar book. I took notes and it has been very helpful.
I understand the language in a way that would not be possible without that book.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Geo_Dude
Geo_DudePlus
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Agreed with this suggestion. My only frustration is that even basic grammar books tend to take some of your knowledge about grammar (how to form questions, for example, or that town names don't generally require a le/la) for granted. BTW, which book/books do you recommend? I started with "Practice Makes Perfect: Basic French" by Kurbegov and then decided to put that one down for later use in favor of Kurbegov's "French Grammar Drills: 2nd Edition".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/annaannaannaan

If you've learned a fair few French verbs in the past then hopefully the patterns will come back to you pretty quickly. I originally learned French "old school" (also a long time back!) and I'm mostly still just revising in DL. But Spanish is new to me and yes I do need outside sources for verbs and grammar rules. I try to learn a little old school every day, but I always make time for DL. It's just more fun which motivates me, and even if I just scrape through some lessons more by luck than skill, I've still learned something every time I use it. Best of both worlds! Bonne chance :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyEvilSlosh
HappyEvilSlosh
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I really wouldn't object if, when presenting verbs, duolingo indicated maybe something like the conjugation for a regular verb. I was struggling with the very basic verbs quite a lot until I just looked up how a regular one is conjugated and it's going a lot more smoothly now.

My partner says she gets the impression duolingo is kind of focused on the immersion aspect of learning a language, but that it takes it a bit too far: it wouldn't hurt to have some instructions a la that from a text book too. :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salihua
salihua
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It seems to me that when Duo has a new verb you can mouse over for the translation and find a 'hot spot' for conjugation. Reverso also has a conjugator - where you can enter any of the forms...they will highlight which it is and give you the infinitive.

http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-french-verb-rel%C3%A8vent.html

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyEvilSlosh
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What I was getting it was that I want something like the table at this website that actually spells out the regular endings verbs take. http://french.about.com/od/grammar/a/erverbs_regular.htm

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/killary45
killary45Plus
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I love Duo but it does not teach verbs very well. I am not in favour of giving us pages of conjugations - that is so off-putting and indigestible. Far better to teach verbs the way that Michel Thomas did. He never used conjugations at all, but just explained the basic pattern for a verb type and then gave practice questions all based on that pattern. With Duo the questions are all so random that it is very hard to work out the pattern the verbs follow.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tommg
tommg
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I have used Anki in combination with DL for learning verb conjugations in languages like Portuguese and French, and I hardly ever have a problem recalling the correct form of verbs in new DL lessons. About 1000 cards should cover and teach you 99% of verb conjugations. You can learn this deck in a matter of weeks by doing it only for 10-15 minutes every day. Actually building the deck takes more time than learning it, but I guess you can find complete decks among the shared decks or on Memrise.com.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maytelle

I take notes and conjugate the verb as soon as I see it on my screen, this way, i have a notebook while I learn, and I can check my answers and everything.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carcarlene
Carcarlene
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I know how you feel. The first lessons were easy, but when I got to forming questions I could not for the life of me soak it in and recall them by heart.

Rather than give up, I went back and did each lesson review at a time (all of them) up until the questions, then attempted the question lessons again. I did it once a day (took 20 minutes) every day for five days. Now Questions are NO problem. They are in my brain.

Now I am feeling the same way about the Preposition and Pronouns lessons... can NOT get them in my head. But I know I can do it, so I put that frustration aside and go through the motions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carcarlene
Carcarlene
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Also!! When I started reading all the comments after each question my understanding boomed.

Good luck

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mythdefied

Yeah, that's what I tend to do, repeat lessons over and over until I'm certain I understand what's being taught. Problem is it's just not working for the verb lessons. I have to go back to the old conjugation tables and hope my hand can hold up to the work.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Geo_Dude
Geo_DudePlus
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I had a similar issue (getting nailed at the Questions lesson) but I've taken a different approach: Instead of working on memorizing them, I wanted to know -why- what I was doing was wrong (and in a few cases right) so I've started digging into French grammar sites/workbooks. Otherwise I felt like I would be swimming in darkness, even if I did memorize those examples.

It's great that the memorization approach worked for you, though. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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I like "Schaum's Outline of French Grammar: Fifth Edition" (Crocker, M; 2009).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peremptor

Same with me. There's no grammar section and I'm really missing a vocabulary. I'm stuck at the same point in Spanish.

I hope you will get along some time in the near future.

By the way: You only have those "conjugate" buttons when you are on the computer, but I use the Android app very often.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kjusa
kjusa
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Use quizlet to memorize the conjugations with flashcards, games, speller and audio, fast or slow. I think you are on the right track but you maybe surprised by how much you have learned. Use other means to learn but keep up your duo by reviewing old lessons and move on as you feel you are ready. Whenever you see a verb, add the conjugation to quizlet and only move on when you feel ready. I like to do a little duo everyday even if it is just a review of things I have already done. Slow but steady. For me languages are like a slide, you are either moving up or sliding down. Daily practice is the key for me. Best of luck to you whatever way you choose to study. Enjoy the ride. https://quizlet.com

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mythdefied

Someone up above provided this site: https://conjuguemos.com/ which I'm finding very helpful so far. It covers Spanish, too. I'm also using textbooks from the library and the old fashioned written tables, so I figure something will start sticking soon.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peremptor

Thanks guys!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arya.Stark

May I make a recommendation for French verbs? if you're an aural learner, Michel Thomas is absolutely the way to go. He really drills in verb conjugations in an unforgettable way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaileyw21

Hey, I don't think I have gotten to that place yet but for difficult things that are hard to remember I write in the Notes section on my phone. When I get out of school or waiting to be picked up after practice I can review. It can also come in handy when doing lessons. Bonne chance!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Geo_Dude
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I make extensive use of Notes on both my phone and laptop for purposes of vocabulary/spelling/gender help and whatnot. It helps quite a bit.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/claima
claima
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there are 3 groups of verbs .

First you have to know what is the group . For that, you watch how it is constructed

a French verb : you have a root + suffix FOR EX aimer root= aim- suffix= er finir root= fin- + suffix =ir prendre root=prend- + suffix = re

suffix can be -er, -ir, -oir, -re

So, 1 rst group all the verbs (50%) which finish with -er (except aller, irregular verb)

take the root and add the ending:

PRESENT

je root + e; tu root + es; il, elle, on root + e; nous root+ ons; vous root + ez; ils, elles root + ent;

je mang-e, tu rêv-es, il aim-e, nous parl-ons, vous décid-ez, ils entr-ent

So you have e, es, e, ons, ez, ent

2nd group all the verbs which end with -ir and have -issant with present participle je root + is
tu .............is; il, elle, on ......it; nous.........issons ; vous.........issez; ils, elles........issent;

fin-ir ( finissant) je fin-is , tu réfléch-is, il durc-it etc

so you have is, is, it, issons, issez, issent

3° group : all the others, with the end -ir, -oir, -re, + aller

je .......s; tu........s; il, elle, on .....t; nous .............ons; vous...........ez; ils, elles.............nt;

plai-re je plai-s, part-ir nous part-ons

OR je ....ds ; tu ds; il, elle, on ......d; nous, vous, ils, elles : as above (ons, ez, nt);

prend-re je pren-ds vend-re elle vend

So you have s, s , t, ons, ez, nt OR ds, ds, d, ons, ez, nt

IMPARFAIT the easier because for all the groups it is the same conjugaison

je ....ais; tu...ais; il, elle, on...ait; nous.....ions; vous.......iez; ils, elles..........aient;

VERY IMPORTANT with "tu" the verb ends ALWAYS with "s" for all the times.
with il, elle or on NEVER ends with "s" for all the times. with ils, elles ALWAYS ends with "nt" for all the times.

You can see le group http://www.bescherelle.com/index-conjugueur.php

for the first and second group, it is easy, you have just to learn the ends for every time.

For the third group, it is more difficult, because there are many irregular verbs, we have to learn them.

And of course, you have être and avoir ....

I hope I helped a little

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/puppy7989

Thi is Claima's excellent post with a little bit of formatting to make it easier to follow. I am hoping Claima will copy this under his/her own name and then I can delete this post.

There are 3 groups of verbs .

First you have to know which "group" the verb is in . For that, look at how it is constructed

With a French verb : you have a root + suffix eg.

  • "aimer" root= aim+ suffix= er

  • "finir" root = fin + suffix = ir

  • "prendre" root = prend + suffix = re

So the suffix can be -er, -ir, -oir, -re

  • PRESENT

1st GROUP - ER verbs So, the first group is 50% of all the verbs. They finish with -er (except aller, irregular verb)

Take the root and add the ending:

je root + e; tu root + es; il, elle, on root + e; nous root + ons; vous root + ez; ils, elles root + ent;

je mang-e, tu rêv-es, il aim-e, nous parl-ons, vous décid-ez, ils entr-ent

So you have e, es, e, ons, ez, ent

2nd GROUP all the verbs which end with -ir and have -issant with present participle

je root + is, tu .............is; il, elle, on ......it; nous.........issons ; vous.........issez; ils, elles........issent;

fin-ir ( finissant) je fin-is , tu réfléch-is, il durc-it etc

so you have is, is, it, issons, issez, issent

3rd GROUP : all the others, with the ending -ir, -oir, -re, + aller

je .......s; tu........s; il, elle, on .....t; nous .............ons; vous...........ez; ils, elles.............nt;

plai-re je plai-s, part-ir nous part-ons

OR je ....ds ; tu ds; il, elle, on ......d; nous, vous, ils, elles : as above (ons, ez, nt*);

prend-re je pren-ds vend-re elle vend So you have s, s , t, ons, ez, nt OR ds, ds, d, ons, ez, nt

  • IMPARFAIT is easier because for all the groups it is the same conjugation

je ....ais; tu...ais; il, elle, on...ait; nous.....ions; vous.......iez; ils, elles..........aient;

VERY IMPORTANT

  • with "tu" the verb ALWAYS ends with "s" for all the tenses.

  • with "il, elle or on" the verb NEVER ends with "s" for any of the tenses.

  • with "ils, or elles" the verb ALWAYS ends with "nt" for all the tenses.

You can see le group http://www.bescherelle.com/index-conjugueur.php

The first and second group are easy, you have just to learn the endings - they are the same every time.

For the third group, it is more difficult, because there are many irregular verbs, so we have to learn them.

And of course, you have être and avoir ....

I hope I helped a little

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/claima
claima
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thanks you Puppy7989, you 're great

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simbabque

This is a very helpful post. It would be a lot easier to read if you'd format it a little. I just posted a link to how markdown works further up, but here it is again: http://daringfireball.net/projects/markdown/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/claima
claima
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Yes, but Im French, and I'm learning English, so it is difficult for me to understand and to use this link. Perhaps when I will have improve my English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darren_Mart

I'm pretty much in the same boat, but I think it boils down to the same recurring theme -- everyone has their own unique formula and learning style. I like Duolingo a lot but it'll never be my primary learning tool. I'm not a big fan of negative reinforcement, and let's face it, the French track forces you to make mistakes and endure penalties as a means to learn. I prefer to learn first, sans pressure, and then make mistakes that I can easily own up to. It's better for the blood pressure that way :)

That said, Duo's been great for reinforcing the material I'm learning in more traditional programs. I started with Fluenz to pounce on those conjugations you speak of, then sprinkled in Duo to change things up. Now I've got a combination of tools that works for me (Assimil + Yabla + Ouino + Duolingo) and it look a lot of false starts to find the right mixture. I hope you experiment and find the tools that work best for you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knitmonkey

Things that have helped me: Many of the sites others have listed - including any of the many conjugation sites available - I go look up the conjugations as I start doubting my brain. I also almost always have a google translate window open and I'll answer DL first - then, if needed, I'll check my answer in Google Translate before pressing the enter button in DL... that way I'm still answering the question, identifying my mistakes and feeling less frustrated by having to restart sections multiple times...more success! I was happy to see the Anki link in this string - hadn't found that yet. Oh yes - I used discussions to find other great resources that work for my brain. For me, I don't like rote memorization for conjugation. If I had of had DuoLingo as a resource when I was in high school French, I might actually have learned to speak French! Love it, but it's not the only tool I use.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marebelo

the Le Figaro site have a page just with translations. helps a lot!! http://leconjugueur.lefigaro.fr/frlistedeverbe.php

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valleygirl69

I like the fact that it contains a lot more information than other sites of the same nature- especially the part at the very bottom a verb page where there is a list of verbs conjugated the same way. I've been trying to make a list of these by consulting various books, but... this will be a great help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/myselfesteem

The website has a conjugation table for each verb so, no need for flashcards, its all built-in....I wish the app gave this table, because I was lost too before I found it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simbabque

The conjugation is hidden in a link in the hint that you get when you hover over the verb to show its meaning.

Imgur

Imgur

I believe the additional tenses, passive and stuff will show up after you've completed the lessons for them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jolynnedougherty
jolynnedougherty
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I am very old school and technologically impaired. I write everything in a notebook. Listening, seeing and the physical act of writing helps the lessons stick in my brain. Good luck getting past the wall.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mythdefied

Exactly this. Because it was how I was taught languages in the 80s/90s, it's how I best learn new conjugations now. I've made up my own spreadsheet with the pronouns and blank spaces for whatever verb I'll be conjugating. A couple hours a day with that and I should be back on track sometime soon.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carcarlene
Carcarlene
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this is exactly what I was trying to say. How did you put images up?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/simbabque

Duolingo uses markdown for the discussions. It is a very simplistic yet powerful markup language that has become popular more and more. Especially through the StackExchange network it is probably now widely used by non-technical people. You can read more about it on the creator's website. There is a guide there, too.

Including an image works by doing this:

<pre>![Alt-Tag](http://url/to/image) </pre>

The screenshots themselves I just took with Windows' Snipping Tool because I didn't have anything else at hand, and uploaded them to my Imgur-Account. They even offer a markdown link directly on the image page, but it points to the image inside of imgur. To use it with the above markup you need to add a .png (or .jpg respectively) to the URL.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carcarlene
Carcarlene
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Coding is a hobby pastime for me. But I've never touched any of the fancy new stuff. I will look into that, it would most likely be useful. Merci beaucoup, Sim

Alt-Tag

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samy1979
Samy1979
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I just say that the duolingo way works for me. Far better than any other way I tried to learn conjunctions. It's still not easy, but for me faster than trying to memorize conjunction tables...

PS: I mean conjugation ^^^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyEvilSlosh
HappyEvilSlosh
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Do you mean conjugation tables, or are conjunction tables some new horror I have yet to meet?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samy1979
Samy1979
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I mean conjugation...^^

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/A51f
A51f
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I am having a hard time determining when to use different conjugates and stuff too!!! Try and Try again. . . i guess.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calvin2507

I'm on a roadblock as well, but not conjugating verbs. For me, they're easy. The thing that bugs me the most is trying to decide if a noun is masc. of fem. Does anyone have any ideas? For me, I don't want to use an online dictionary because I think that I'm cheating on Duo, and I don't really know how you learn from that. Rote memorization isn't working for me, as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/killary45
killary45Plus
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Can I make a suggestion: use an online dictionary.

Duo is not a game in which you can cheat, it is an aid to language learning. I happen to think that it is by far the best around for practising things you have learned, but not particularly good at teaching you new words and grammar.

I would suggest that you look around for all the aids to learning you can find, both online and in book form. Use them to help you make progress in Duo and you will find it much less frustrating.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingthatcher
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For french it was easy to get the hang of the conjugation; same happened for Croatian, Italian, Dalmatian, Portuguese, German, etc. The only times I had to use a brute force technique were when I learned Arabic conjugations and Irish ones (from the Munster dialect; the other dialects don't make use of conjugation for person or number). With those I wrote it out over and over for multiple different verbs and also strengthened and quizzed myself with Anki. Good luck for you! Sretno!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Parislover1217

Try conjuguemos we use it in french class it really helped with my etrê conjugation

2 years ago