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  5. "Absolutely, Maha."

"Absolutely, Maha."

Translation:تَماماً يا مَها.

June 29, 2019

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/endlessautumn

Who else keeps forgetting يا before names?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonVoorheess

In daily usage , we don't really put Ya before each name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mm107

A Moroccan friend I text with said I don't need to use it in chat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yiangaruga

Same. But according to what I've learnt, it means something like "o"

So it's like :"welcome, o Farid"

Weird


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sm119

Just wanted to comment on that. So annoying! Stop making the vocative mandatory!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Negomi2

I do not forget it, but my husband who is a syrian says it is wrong. Maybe it is spoken in Marocco but in Syria it is not polite! It is like saying "hey you" .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yako500

Native speaker here. Tamam is more like "fine", "alright", or "sounds good", e.g. "keefak" ("how are you" in Levantine Arabic), "ana tamam" ("i'm fine/alright") or in this example, "sounds good/alright Maha". I'd use "akeed" or "akeedan" for absolutely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_FiX_

speaking of dialect, Egyptians say استبينا ('we're set' or 'agreed')

Which is actually a direct phonetic carry over from the Italian sta bene


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CTfalcoUSA

Isn't "Alright, Maha" a more accurate translation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

What about "Hasanan" for "all right"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErfanRezamand

How about "completely, totally, entirely, thoroughly, OK, al right and enough" as synonyms?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Away54

ErfanRezamand,

(1) "Completely" and "totally" (اكتمالا : perfectly) are closer to the Standard Arabic meaning of تماما!

(2) "Absolutely", "Ok" and "alright" are common meanings in Slangs for تماما. Nowadays.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bryson610892

I interpreted "absolutely" here as being a reply to "thank you".

I feel like tamaam is more like finished, or OK, or complete.

My teacher would ask "kull-u tamaam?", "Is everyone finished?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonVoorheess

What ? That's the first time I hear the phrase Kullu tammam

It may be هل إنتهيتم كلكم ؟

Or هل إنتيهتم ؟


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CTfalcoUSA

I can imagine that his teacher would ask “kullu tammam”. It’s more of a dialect phrase and doesn’t precisely mean “is everyone finished” but can take a similar meaning


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yako500

Ya, its more like, "Is everyone good?" in a classroom context, which could mean is everyone done/ready to move on to the next thing. In standard Arabic, "is everyone finished?" would be something like "(hal) kullu intaha?" Or "intahaytum?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vsandl

I can't distinguish these miniscule letters. I've tried all the recommendations but none of them work. Why don't we all ask Duo to enlarge the script?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark_albiljiki

Add the following extention to your browser (chrome or firefox) - you can sett many different things like how big, fonts.... and is made especialy for arabic https://basshelal.github.io/Wudooh/ works nicely for me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jaime631714

يا is not necessary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IshratIslam2001

In previous lesson it was أنتِ everywhere but then suddenly it became أنتَ at the end why is that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mark_albiljiki

I believe : "anta" talking to a male person and "anti" talking to a female. (hal ant.. dhaki -(are you smart) you should say Hal anta dhaki to male person and/or Hal anti dhaki speaking to a female person. هل انت ذكي If you are the reader of that question it will be obvious anta if you are a male person. You will notice this in alot of words as you progress in studying for exemple the question "how are you" is كيف حالك. (kayf halik (to a female) and kayf halak (to a male) (or like in Jordanian Levantine Arabic (dialect) : Kayfik or Kayfak)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yiangaruga

I thought it was حالكِ for females and حالكَ for males

Probably wrong though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Away54

Yiangaruga,

You're correct! In Standard Arabic, for a female interlocutor, it is: كيف حالُكِ؟ kaifa Haaluki? while, for a male interlocutor, it is: كيف حالُكَ؟ kaifa Haaluka?. If we hear someone say "kaifa Haalik?" or "kaifa Haalak?" words (ie. in the nominative cases), they are Dialects.

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