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  5. "سام كَريم."

"سام كَريم."

Translation:Sam is generous.

July 1, 2019

19 Comments


[deactivated user]

    Yes we have that word يكون But since we conjugate the adjective based on the subject and the single and plural, we drop it, it us not necessary.

    Sam is generous You can say سام كريم(most used) Or سام يكون كريما(almost not used)

    Sam and George are generous سام وجورج كريمان Or سام وجورج يكونان كريمين

    Reem us generous (reem is famle) ريم كريمة Or رييم تكون كريمة

    In the all above first sentences, you can see the adjective changes corresponding to the subject So it us nit necessary to use "يكون" at all


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AhmadMurcii

    Actually if you say سام يكون" كريماً," an Arabic speaker would probably understand that "Sam is becoming generous," (which also means that Sam wasn't generous before,) or otherwise the sentence could be taken as a word for word translation of a sentence that has been built in another language rather than Arabic!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucca937881

    is there a word in arabic for 'is'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ali94712

    I think there's not. It's somehow like in Russian, where instead of saying "You are clever" they say "You - clever".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quathia

    There is, but it's only used in the past tense. In the present, you just say the subject and the predicate, omitting the verb.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LA95kr

    I heard that Arabic is a VSO language. Then shouldn't the sentence be the other way around (kariim saam instead of saam kariim)?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hadi949111

    No. That case is when using adjectives like : I saw a long tree رأيت شجرة طويلة Literally : i-saw a-tree long .


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quathia

    Verb-subject-object. There is no verb, Sam is the subject, and there is no object. kariim is the predicate, which is used in nominal sentences (sentences without a verb). They are always subject-predicate, so sam-kariim.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I2LX0YXU

    Press the up button if your muslim and reply if your not. Im just interested.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kave562365

    Pronounciations are completely westerns and you have missed a big part of arabic called اعراب. Which is important in both writing and speaking.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohmmedabe2

    من يريد ان يتحدث معي اللغة العربية


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mehmet-KYMN

    Uncle Sam? Nice reference...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean_Roy

    I plugged سام into Google Translate, and it said it means 'poisonous,' 'toxic.' :-P


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hadi949111

    True. It is سامّ


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manar1310

    It's just a name and its not even arabic so it doesn't mean its actual meaning here

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