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  5. "Je marche."

"Je marche."

Translation:I am walking.

June 9, 2014

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolineBc1

Before i was corrected because apparently marche meant working not walking. Now i got it wrong because it meant Walking and not working! How do know when to use which one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2329

It's like in English, we sometimes say we left the engine running in our car. In this case, we say "running" but we mean it's on, operating, working. In French, they have a similar idiom but they say that something "walks" instead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dzamie

On mobile, it suggests "sth" as one possible word. What on earth is sth?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2329

That's an abbreviation for "something". I'm not sure why it was suggested here, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dzamie

Huh. Native english speaker, and I've never heard of it before. Thanks for the reply!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2069

It is only an abbreviation for "something" which you will often see in examples shown in a dictionary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexGibson71765

A lonely road, the only one that I have ever known


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Freyr77

Yeah, what do you use when!? Cos apparently elephants can march, but I can't... what?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2329

"Marcher" is "to walk".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zax347

I said mange its so hard to hear this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lis368506

I'm using a Samsung galaxy 4 with headphones and you can distinctly hear the CH there is no ch in mange :))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/owy20061

ok well done you walked....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aladji11

its easy not hard


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/di.ca.mi

This is confusing - before it was translated as working


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2069

As you probably know by now, many French words are used in different ways and translate to different words in English when the context changes. "Il marche" = he walks (is walking). Ça marche ! = it works! http://www.wordreference.com/fren/marcher


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Parsamana

Another problem is that though the same verb can be used to mean marching (i.e. Marcher), it won't accept it as an alternative to "I walk." I tried it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naia921103

Why is i marche not correct??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2329

The primary translation of "marcher" is "to walk".

English spells it "march", not "marche".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maggie.h14

i heard that "je marche" could be 'i walk, i am walking, i do walk' is this wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2329

It's correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nikk9oo8

is i march wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gregory601004

I have reached this point without too many hiccups. Now I can no longer get this program to accept correct answers as correct answer. I nees to move forward. PLEASE FIX THIS !!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelindriaT

the present is always I am doing etc.. or I do I have never been taught anything else. It is even in French text books. I wrote "I am walking".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2329

"I walk" is present. "I am walking" is present continuous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dinyarbharucha

why is i walk wrong even the answer says i walk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JIM983910

When the male narrator says"marche" it sounds as though he is pronouncing the "e" on the end. It's as though he has an Italian accent. I have noticed this before. This could be confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBennett6

Some French speakers do pronounce like this. It depends on region, but also on speaking speed. It's far more likely to be used when someone is speaking slowly and distinctly, like in public speaking.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nyendwa

Why is je marche correct and noy je suis marche


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2329

In English, we form the present progressive by conjugating "to be" and then using the gerund of the main verb.

Just like in English, you cannot conjugate the main verb the same way as the auxiliary verb. We don't say "He is walks", we say "He is walking".

But most Romance languages tend to use the simple present in places where we in English would use the simple present or the present progressive.

In French, the present progressive is used differently (typically when you need to highlight that it's happening right now) and formed differently than in English: Je suis en train de marcher.

For now, just stick with "Je marche".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelindriaT

to Rae.F - So does that mean I can only only translate it as'I am walking' if there is a continuation in the sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2329

How you translate it into English depends on whatever's appropriate. If you're a native speaker, just use your instincts for what sounds best.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelindriaT

PS to Rae.F I just received another notice in my mail. It appears I was correct re writing 'I am walking', and Duolingo just changed its mind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2329

On Duolingo, "I walk" and "I am walking" are equally correct ways to translate "Je marche". In real-life conversation with context, use whichever is appropriate.

Also, are you unable to reply directly to me? Is that why you keep making new top-level comments?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelindriaT

Never even noticed this option! I am so busy multi-tasking, and have never really paid any attention to the options, etc. Thanks for focusing me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelindriaT

to Rae.F Umm, that sounds good to me. Thanks!

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