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  5. "أَنْتَ مِن أُسْتُرالْيا يا ب…

"أَنْتَ مِن أُسْتُرالْيا يا بوب."

Translation:You are from Australia, Bob.

July 7, 2019

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abshir979515

Is ((Anti)) he and ((Anta)) She??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickFaber

(Anti) أَنْتِ is to address women. (Anta) أَنْتَ is to address men.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djmcosmo

From what I have observed, the last "mark" is ` above when addressing men and , below the last letter when addressing women. Do I have that correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

Anti = you (f) Anta = you (m)

Huwa = he Hiya = she

update: You do now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Why do you say No, Benton? The mark IS above for men (the vowel A) and below for women (the vowel I)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

The writer had it backwards when I wrote the comment, but has since changed it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Thank you for explaining, Benton. That's the trouble when people can correct their original text - it makes a nonsense of the reply.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Yes. And I think a good way to remember that is that the positions are similar to the symbols for male and female - a cross and circle for a female (below the line), and an arrow pointing diagonally up for a male (above the line). I hope that's clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohsmits

Yes. The accent mark above for the men (fatha) indicates an 'a' sound, whereas the below mark for the women (kasra) indicates a 'i' sound. Then there's also the curly (kind a like a &) mark above (damma) which indicates a 'u' sound.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mdb_

Anti is "you" (feminine) and anta is "you" (masculine)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PurplePenguin15

The vowel marks are above (fathaa) for male and below (kasra) for female. A quick explanation of vowels... https://www.madinaharabic.com/arabic-reading-course/lessons/L000_002.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anaam744249

No , Anti انتِ means She , And Antaانت means he


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

No, Anaam. Both those pronouns are second person (you), not third (he/she). Although you're right about the genders.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yashanna1

How would you put this as a question? Because it seems a weird sentence to tell somebody where he is from. Are you from Australia, Bob?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleDa878143

I can think of two instances when I might use this type of sentence. First, if Bob was asking me if I knew where he was from. I would answer, "You're from Australia, Bob." Second, if I'm about to ask him something about being from Australia. For example, "You're from Australia, Bob. Have you ever seen a kangaroo?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zaighamM1

This is just a statement - you add 'هل' / 'hal' to make it a question, 'هل أَنْتَ مِن أُسْتُرالْيا يا بوب؟' - as you learn later on in this course =). some of the statements are quite weird... Depends on the context in which you are using them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WardaWardani

Also the sentence in Arabic is marked by rising intonation. I have translated it like an interrogative sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

WardaWardani. The trouble is that intonation is not universally the same. For example, in Russian, intonation generally descends markedly in questions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anaam744249

We can ask (هل)Hal means do you and it is used to ask about anything, for example Are you a teacher Are you happy ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexsandraTracy

The intonation at the end makes the sentence sound like an interrogative sentence, even when it's not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephS314

It is incredibly difficult to see the subtle differences between similar words when the writing is so small. Even with my browser zoomed in, I can barely distinguish the vowel marks. (And when I zoom in I can no longer see the buttons and progress indicators at the same time, which affects usability.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldHarm1

again, the letters are too small for reading easily and turns these exercises into frustrating guessing games instead of proper reading. Please enlarge them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShiffraTheRabbit

Why the distinction between "You are" and "You're" in the English when Arabic doesn't need the word for "are" for the sentence to make sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

"You are" and "you're" mean exactly the same thing. "You're" is just a contraction, or slurring together, of the words "you are". I use "you're" most of the time. We use "you are" in formal writing or to emphasize "are", or if it sounds better to us in the sentence. In English, unlike Arabic, "are/is" has to be used in sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShiffraTheRabbit

I know, English is my first language. I'm wondering why one is considered an incorrect translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

Oh, if that is the case, and you didn't make a mistake somewhere, it's just because "you're" hasn't been programmed in as a correct answer. Just click "My answer should be accepted" in the "Report" section and they might program it in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Because the programme is imperfect. But a native English speaker would just shrug their shoulders. I think it's more concerning for non-native English speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anaam744249

There are no are , is, am an and a in Arabic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bir280185

sometimes i wonder if whoever is writing these, realizes the general gender usages for the names in english, because sometimes the anti and anta seems mixed .. or maybe its just the tininess of my phone screen....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frans369837

Shouldnt this be the male version of "are you"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

It is the male version of "you": "anta". The female version is "anti".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewSor4

What makes it 2anta or 2anti? What is the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleDa878143

mdb explains it above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anaam744249

Anta means he ,And Anti means she.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bir280185

Yeah I guess you also missed the " ITS THE TEENY TINY-NESS OF THE SCREEN SO YOU CANT SEE THE EENY WEENY TEEENY TINY ACCENT SLASH UNDER THE TEENY TINY WORD.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara53888

When i write this sentence why do I feel like if bob has lost his memory and can't remember anything at all


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anaam744249

No, it is like you are from Australian bob?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlizaAsgha1

How will we know it is a question or answer

Hit the like or comment if your answer was also wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleDa878143

To be a question, it would need to add the word هَل at the beginning, since it would be a yes/no question. Also, look to see if it ends with a period or question mark


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anaam744249

We can ask (هل ) ( Hal) and it is used to ask about anything, for example Are you a teacher Are you happy ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seths_Dad

Love the fact that we are not only apparently telling bob where he is from, but we are somehow no doing it as an imperative. This app is silly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

It would be even weirder if we did it as an imperative. I think, "You are from America, Bob" is more conceivable than, "Be from America, Bob!", no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HumayraKha2

What happened, my answer is correct. This is happening many times


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vsandl

This sounds like and only makes sense as a question and we haven't learnt about any question indicators so Duo should accept the translation as a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseMD6

Correction was wrong

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