"Він купив ці кросівки у Денвері."

Translation:He bought these sneakers in Denver.

July 10, 2019

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

Shouldn't "shoes" should be accepted as translation for "krosivky?" No one says "sneakers" in modern American English, and "shoes" does not exclusively mean "tufli" (which would more often be called "dress shoes" or "formal shoes").

July 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mortificator

No one says "sneakers" in modern American English

What do they say?

July 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

Tennis/running/athletic shoes. Or, more often than not, just shoes. (It's "tufli" that are more likely to be given extra qualifiers as "dress/formal shoes.")

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalyaMikhailovna

People still say sneakers in Modern American English..

July 16, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

Sorry. A more precise statement might be "Very few people under the age of 70 still say 'sneakers.'"

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GalyaMikhailovna

On the contrary, it's your dialectical region, not age, man :/ Not trying to cause an issue, but it really is legitimately the preferred word in some regions of the US... https://www.sbnation.com/lookit/2017/7/12/15958294/sneakers-tennis-shoes-what-do-you-call-them

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

That's actually really interesting. Thanks for sharing!

In fact comparing your map with the Google books graph is even more interesting. The majority of the country says "tennis shoes," yet the books available to Google books have a distinct preference for "sneakers." I wonder if this means there are editors running around putting "sneakers" into books, who themselves say "tennis shoes" in their daily lives.

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csgushue

Interesting... I'm a 34 year old, native English speaker and I still say sneakers. Maybe I'm just an old soul?

July 22, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

Someone above shared a map showing that it's a regional thing. (Where I'm from, I've never heard anyone younger than their 70sish say it unironically, neither in conversations nor on TV).

July 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagitta145

All кросівки are shoes, but not all shoes are кросівки. We do not accept "fruit" as a translation of "яблуко", so we do not accept "shoes" as a translation of "кросівки".

Not only "sneakers" is accepted. All accepted synonyms are: trainers, sneakers, athletic shoes, tennis shoes, gym shoes, sports shoes, runners, running shoes. That's what "кросівки" are. You can type the word "кросівки" in Google Images and see what type of shoes this word means.

July 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

I totally agree that you shouldn't accept "Fruit" for "Iabluko," because there is no large English-speaking community that says "fruit" when they mean "iabluko." But what I'm saying is that there IS a large English-speaking community that says "shoes"--just "shoes"--when they mean "krasovki."

I know what krasovki are. And in my everyday life, I point to that kind of shoe and I say "shoes." If someone says to me, "I need new shoes," unless they also say "formal/dress shoes," I assume we are going to a store that sells "krasovki."

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mortificator

Кросівки, from Russian кроссовки (кроссовые туфли) since 1972, from кросс (a running sport), from English cross (cross country).

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

Krasovki, krosivky. Point is that sound conveys the same meaning to a Ukrainian-speaker as "shoes" conveys to people where I'm from.

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

I obviously meant "krosivky" and misspelled it. But thanks for the etymology lesson.

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagitta145

So, "shoes" in English can mean footwear in general. That would be "взуття". Also it can mean туфлі, more formal shoes or, for example, high heel shoes.

Yes, you can point at sneakers and say "shoes". You can also point at sandals and say "shoes". You can do the same with the word "взуття" in Ukrainian. You can call running shoes or sandals "взуття" since they are both a kind of shoes.

But if you are translating the word "кросівки", you cannot use "shoes", because кросівки does not mean "shoes". It means a particular kind of shoes, running shoes. Also "сандалі" cannot be translated as "shoes", even though you can say "shoes" in a sentence referring to your sandals.

Here in this exercise we want to test your comprehension of the word "кросівки". If you translate it as "shoes" it might mean you did not understand what "кросівки" means and you think it simply means "shoes", any kind of shoes. The point of the exercise is for you to show you got what "кросівки" are, which is running/tennis/sports shoes or sneakers etc.

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

That's not entirely correct. "Shoes" can never mean sandals, because it's not as broad as "footwear;" the toes cannot be exposed. "Shoes" can mean formal footwear, but as I've said, at least where I'm from it would never be taken to mean this alone unless the context was already clear; if not, it would have to be qualified with an adjective like "dress" or "formal." For athletic/tennis/running shoes, however, we would assume that is what "shoes" means without any qualification. That is a significant difference. It means the mental picture we have for just the word "shoes" alone is not a pair of sandals or formal shoes, but krosivky.

I definitely hear what you're saying about wanting to make sure users know that krosivky can only mean athletic shoes. But I don't see why it couldn't explain that in the lesson and accept shoes in the exercise with "athletic shoes" offered as the other possible answer in the answer, as it often does in similar cases.

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Breandn

Not everyone on the internet uses language the same way. But for many Americans, "shoes" is a contrast with "sandals." Many times I have been told when walking into a place with sandals on, "You have to put shoes on." They didn't have to explain any further that nothing open-toed would be acceptable.

You can devise exercises to make sure people know the difference between krosivky and tufli without forcing us to only answer with "sneakers/athletic shoes" for krosivky every single time. (A situation like the example I gave for sandals vs. shoes, for example).

I am new to Ukrainian, but I've been using Russian in my daily life for over a decade, and when people say krossovki, in my head I'm translating it to "shoes," not become I'm confused about what they mean, but because in my native language, that is what "shoes" means, that is precisely how I would say the same sentence. It would never occur to me to say "He bought those sneakers in Denver," and if someone did say that to me back home, I would assume they were from somewhere far away.

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mortificator

Point is

I realized that and thank you for the comments. But the word "krasovki" doesn't exist.

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagitta145

Strange... I just searched "summer shoes" and I do get ones with exposed toes as well. Many high heel shoes have exposed toes. First time I hear this description of what "shoes" stands for...

In any case, no, that's the point, we do not allow "shoes" for "кросівки" because how would I know whether you actually know it but call them "shoes" because it's common to do that, or that you don't know it and you are not learning?.. You can call them whatever you want of course, but here to pass the test unfortunately we can't use "shoes" cause there is no way to differentiate between the two cases above...

July 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mortificator

The discussion was very helpful. Thank you all.

July 17, 2019
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