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  5. "Lavoro tanto in settimana."

"Lavoro tanto in settimana."

Translation:I work a lot during the week.

April 16, 2013

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/countvlad

I used 'in a week' which I think is more idiomatic than 'in the week' which was given as the correct answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgbachand

agreed - but judged "wrong" by duolingo...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amata124

Same here - why is "the" correct over "a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gaba.caira

I think if you say "in a week" you'd be talking about a specicif week, but if you use "in the week" you mean something like "per week" or "weekly".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/damienv10

In English in a or in the week are synonymous to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gaba.caira

Sorry :( i don't know how to explain this without using spanish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PHScanes

In the [first] week [of this month]

In a week, I work a lot and enjoy nothing

In a week [of that month]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siebolt

"tanto" gives the sensation of exasperation. "molto" is more neutral.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlancheDB

Yes, like " I work so much."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne737429

hence I put "such a lot"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/devaryap

but why preposition "in?" why not "durante"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HydraBianca

So does it mean "I work a lot in every week" or "i work a lot in this specific week "?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bigbass7

Actually, one week since it is "un":)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NikolaStoj43914

And where is DURANTE in italian sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erndog72

I said this week which makes a lot more sense than in the week. What week?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dahlie5

The workweek, I suppose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/temporalthings

why wouldn't "I work so much during the week" be accepted here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alee0810

I wrote, "i work a lot each week" and the correction was that "each" is indefinite where I had needed definite "the."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlancheDB

Without more context, I think it should accept either "in a week" or "in the week". Or is it assumed to be "the" if "una" isn't present? These little details can really be confusing. A mouse-over grammar point would be useful in this situation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lenikitty

Why "in settimana" and not "nella settimana"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dexterjripswich

Sounds very indefinite to me...what tells me it is a specific week?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbarriewalker

It's definitely not a specific week, but in English "in the week" isn't specific with a present tense verb. But I think there is a difference between "in a" and "in the" in this context. "In a week" implies that a lot of work is done/achieved in the course of a week, taken as a whole. "In the week" implies to me that that a lot of the time each week is spent working.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyyashElmota

Lavoro was a bit confusing, i couldn't tell it was "i work", the menu said it was "the work"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/avi0629

Generally, a sentence contains a verb, a subject [and sometime an object]. If the word is ambiguous, a verb or noun, and the sentence does not contain any other verb, i suggest to consider that word as a verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitalii_Ivanov

I answered "I work a lot this week" and it corrected me "I work a lot IN this week". Do I need this "IN" in a sentence like this? (not a native speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbarriewalker

Sorry, neither version is really everyday English. "I work a lot (in) this week" would have to be contrasting it with a different week or weeks. E.g. talking about a 2-week work cycle: "I work a lot (in) this week but not very much next." With and without "in" are equal. I think what you're looking for is either "I am working a lot this week" or "I have worked a lot this week" both of which are good English. Adding "in" to those is just wrong. The only justification I can think of for "I am working a lot in this week." is if "in" means "indoors", perhaps said by a farmer doing a lot of paperwork. In this case there would be a definite pause between "in" and "this".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisHicke2

Why is it "in" instead of "durante"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bjojoe

during=>durante


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/seattlepatricia

Is I am working any different from I work? Both are present tense and the verb signifies ongoing activity


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mary942691

I put "I work a lot in a week" and was marked incorrect. In the USA, "I work a lot during the week" means (every) Monday - Friday, but not the weekend. Is that implied in the Italian sentence? "I work a lot in a week" means the level or amount of work is high each week.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonnaSidoti

Why did the voice change to "male"? Freaked me out! What happened to the woman?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wolf1mtb

Durante la settimana = During the week. Nella settimana = in the week. The algorithm needs revisions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KevinFranc5

Why not "durante" vs "in"????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DouglasPet12

Why not durante instead of in?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tedmurphy4

Where do they get "during"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurelMont6

DL Left out the word durante.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veena357117

Durante means during?

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