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  5. "أَبي كَريم."

"أَبي كَريم."

Translation:My father is generous.

July 15, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cypher922476

I keep getting these backwards, answering "my generous father" instead of "my father is generous". In the earlier sentences we had to reverse the adjective and noun (eg "a generous doctor"), so i don't get why we don't have to now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1376

The above sentence is nominal sentence, formed by a nominal subject and a nominal predicate; Meaning: the speaker is telling the receiver that his father is generous. The adjective (كريم) [generous] here is a "predicative" adjective telling the status of "my father," and hence "my father IS generous".

Now, if I want to describe "my father" as being generous using an attributive adjective, then I would say (أبي الكريم) [abí-l-karím] -using my own notation here- [my generous father]. Notice how (كريم) becomes (الكريم), by adding a definition article to it (الـ). This is because when adjectives becomes attributive (i.e. attached to the noun and describes the noun), the adjective must follow the noun in gender, number and definition. Adding (-í) to the word (i.e. "my") is a form of definition to the word in Arabic, and hence the word (كريم) has to be defined as well, and hence we add (الـ) to mimic the noun which it describes (أبي).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeStoltz1

So basically adding al- to kareem would constitute the answer being My generous father as opposed to My father is generous... And it would be pronounce without the A in al-? Is this correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1376

Yep. The predicative in nominal sentences in Arabic are typically and mostly undefined (talking about simple structure here).
The "a" of AL, disappears in pronunciation of أبي الكريم but not in writing of course because it is Hamzat-Wassl (connecting Hamza), so it acts somewhat like a schwa. In fact here in this specific sentence, the word أبي (my father) might have a shorter vowel (-í) to its end when speaking it and connecting it to the word after. Just an approximation of how it would sound: abilkarím. Some might say it as: abiyalkarím.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeStoltz1

Great answer. I was actually sounding it out in my head several times before I even got to where you wrote "Just an approximation of how it would sound: abilkarím. Some might say it as: abiyalkarím. ". And it was spot on. Shukran Sadiq.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1376

UW. As a thumb rule (nothing official here): The tendency in Arabic is to base the spelling on sounding the words singularly, and let the tongue do the rest when speaking as things come naturally in sentences. For this, spelling does not change much in Arabic except in limited cases (and mostly for conventional orthography rather than spelling).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/melanie395182

I also dont understand why "my generous father" is incorrect


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1376

I've answered in the reply above before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan569895

They do have different meanings so have to be written differently but in reality if you said either we would understand you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vsandl

Why isn't there a proper grammar reference section on this structure?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan569895

I find it interesting that we have a lot of generous fathers but no generous mothers and we also have a lot of weird sisters... i think duo you need to think carefully about the balance of the exercises


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gaeiie

Could this be translated as "My father is Kareem [the man named Kareem]"/"My father is named Kareem"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1376

could be ... it depends on the context to understand what the speaker is really talking about here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeStoltz1

My generous father.... incorrect.

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