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  5. "هَل تَعْرِفين يا كَري؟"

"هَل تَعْرِفين يا كَري؟"

Translation:Do you know, Carrie?

July 16, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timorss

Why ta3arfin? Why the "in" in the end


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1346

because "Carrie" is supposedly a female. Thus when you dedicate a speech to a female, you add -ín to the present tense: تعرف becomes تعرفين [ta3rif -> ta3rifín]

Another example: you sleep: تنام -> تنامين [tanám -> tanámín]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timorss

wear For a man: Labis Woman: Labisa There is not "in" in the end here, Why is that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1346

to wear:

Past:

you wore(m): لَبِسْتَ [labista], you wore(f): لَبِسْتِ [labisti].

Present:

you wear(m): تَلْبِسُ [talbisu], you wear(f) تَلْبَسين [talbasín].

Future:

you will wear(m): ستلبس [satalbisu], you will wear(f): ستلبس [satalbasín].

The two words you are talking about are not verbs (I'm thinking someone Egyptian taught you this) - These are "verbal nouns" from the verb (labasa) [labasa and labisa are the same]. Verbal noun in Arabic unlike English can have a variety of uses but to keep it simple, I will explain it using the -ing form:

you are wearing: انت لابس [ent lábis], you are wearing (f): انتِ لابسة [inti lábsa] <- I'm typing dialectical form here and not standard. so, Lábis and Lábisa (or Lábsa, Lábisah) are actually nouns and not verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/timorss

Ok i'll try to understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1346

Good luck! I'm here if you like to ask anything :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melan_18

You'd also add 'iin' when using labis and talking to a group of people either all male or mixed female and male. It would be 'aantum laabisiin' M. or M.&F., and 'aantaaiin laabisaat' F. Also about your question, I'm not sure if there's a rule or anything like that, but the only thing I can tell you is you're going to have to learn each word with it's forms and tenses by hearing and seeing them often, and repetition. I guess that's why people say Arabic is hard, either they have to learn it as it is, or the rules are complicated and many. Hope this makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1346

Almost correct. For a group of males or a mix of genders, it would be Antum Lábisún أنتم لابسون, and for exclusively a group of females, it would be Antunna Lábisát أنتن لابسات
However, it's important to note that the previous 2 phrases do not contain a verb like in the question here. They are formed solely by nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melan_18

That's right, I got mixed with a dialect there. Thank you for correcting me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Djibril487949

Does this sentence mean, "Do you know what?" (prelude to sharing some gossip); "Do you know the answer?" (to question previously discussed); or does it have some other specific idiomatic use in Arabic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1346

It simply translates: Do you know, Carrie?
Exactly like that. Of course, it bears no meaning until it is put in some context.

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