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  5. "مِن أَيْن أَنْتِ يا كَري؟"

"مِن أَيْن أَنْتِ يا كَري؟"

Translation:Where are you from, Carrie?

July 17, 2019

7 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norlock

wonder if they will eventually move in some more colloquial abbreviations at some point. for example every native speaker I have encountered simply uses "minwayn" to say "where are you from?" makes everyday use a bit easier.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8

Easier, yes. Proper? No.

The thing is, there is no dialect of Arabic to be considered as an official "thing" nor it has a proper orthography system. Moreover, dialects vary, so when you say "Arabic course" the door is open for many many dialects and variations. For example, Morocco as far as I know has 3 dialects of Arabic (not counting Amazight), and probably 4 or more in Egypt. The safest bet is, to stick to the standard Arabic.

Yet, another example from your example: Minwayn is probably Lebanese or Syrian (Levant in general). In other parts it is: Minwain, Mnain, Imnain, Mineen, Minain, Minween. And notice that the expression is made by 2 words in fact: مِن (min: from), وين (w??n: where). I put "??" because these vowels here as you saw earlier do change drastically from one dialect to another.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/norlock

that's fair. I think that's one of the hardest aspects of learning Arabic, while people will sort of understand you with using MSA they all reply that's not how we say it lol, so it feels at first to be useless info. im only a year in so obviously I feel barely a student, but its intriguing at the variations of dialect. in my searches ive been told to avoid Moroccan for a long while as its so drastically different from the rest so its interesting to hear someone who knows a little more about it. Thx for the input.

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8

Those who say "that's not how we say it" are probably those who do not have a "feel" for Arabic. Many people find it weird to speak proper Arabic even though at, let's say, some educated class or level, people would mix proper Arabic with the regular speech because it has that "ring" to it. I come from a generation when cartoons were dubbed in standard Arabic and we learned the bulk of our Arabic from these cartoons, and also TV series which were done in standard Arabic - all that contributed to the appreciation and to the feel of the language, as a source of strength and eloquence to be used when strength is to be added to the speech. Nowadays, I've seen many cartoons that were dubbed in local dialects (majorly Egyptians) and it just doesn't ring with me. If I have the power, I would ban such cartoons (specially Disney's) with such "silly" dub. Call me a dictator, but culture comes first to me.

As for Moroccan; Even here, people are scared to take a look at it in fact. I think this is something mental really. Like we have here in the East, our dialects are mixed with Persian, Turkish, Indian and finally English words, because of all the history we passed through, likewise it is the case with Moroccan dialect (darija) which already co-existed with Amazight since the early days of Islam there. Later on, this dialect to be mixed with French and Spanish. Personally, when I was active on Instagram, I've tried to listen carefully (and read) the Moroccan dialect or Darija, and I realized that this dialect is like ours, and the core is pure Arabic, but it's just the speed they speak with and the "stress" they apply to syllables that is different. With some focus, I believe one with Arabic background from the East and adapt to it quickly. Probably the confusing part is that the gender of verbs and nouns are a bit mixed up and not as clear as it is for Arabic speakers in the East (I think they use the feminine ending for verbs sometimes even when speaking to males, something unusual for us in the East).

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Giafazio

What's the precise use of يا?

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8

(yá) is a vocative article. There are other articles, but this is the most common one. You put that before the name of the person (or thing) you are calling. You can compare this to the typical article "O" in classical English or "A" in Irish (if you are familiar with Gaeilge).

July 17, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sawashian

I guess the pronunciation isn't right. (كَري) Keray or Kerii (Carrie)?

September 18, 2019
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