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  5. "Er ist ein Junge."

"Er ist ein Junge."

Translation:He is a boy.

April 17, 2013

86 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aline_carneiro

I think we use eine for female and ein for male. Am I right??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/username9009

You also use ein for neuter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoalfra

Thanks to answer my doubts. You are very kind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MegaSpy

Eine is for feminine Ein is for masculine and neuter

They aren't called 'male' and 'female', the proper names are masculing and feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nabelanoviandini

how to differ er and ihr in listening it??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlchen123

er sound like "air" and ihr sound like "ear" Maybe the computer voice is not really good, but usually there is quite a difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S0R0USH

I got it wrong for writing Ihr. Thank you for this clarification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bentgage

I dont see why "Er" can't be "It". It is a Boy... makes sense to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/renata.bahia

it is talking about a specific person, so he is a boy, where er is the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StepJay24

so when do we use er for it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheObserver

When talking about inanimate objects, such as a chair.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SawHM.96

''It'' is ''es'' in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlchen123

It is actually not true in many (probably most) cases. If you take for example "Der Stuhl zerbricht" --> "The chair breaks" and replace the chair with a pronoun you get: "Er zerbricht" --> "He breaks" instead of "It breaks" Which pronoun is used to replace a noun depends on the gender of the noun and not if it is an inanimate thing. Therefore: masculin (der) --> er, feminin (die) --> sie neuter (das) --> es


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

Isn't "Junge" in the accusative case here? Or is "Junge" actually in the nominative case? Because I was expecting an -en to be appended to "ein".

EDIT: Okay, it's in the nominative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dieuler

Why not: Hier ist ein Junge?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/username9009

that means "here is a boy"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarmiteWarrior9

why is it not einen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohamed.gaber

"einen" is for the male (der) in the object form like "Ich kaufe einen Anzug"(I bought a suit), "der Anzug" is in object form here so it took "einen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Windinmyhair27

It sounds like E-a not Er (I know ea isn't a word, i was sounding it out) why is that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

Please read the previous comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Windinmyhair27

thanks for responding so fast! (unlike me)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mohith.gr.

What is the du form of a word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

It is the second person singular form. Verbs take an "-st" ending here like "spielen" (to play) would be "spielst" in du form (that is, "du spielst", "you play"), some verbs change a bit differently like "essen" becomes "isst" in du form but that's more of a pattern of certain verbs themselves that you'll learn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/che1che

is it not also a youngster?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psally007

ihr and er, what's the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/username9009

Er is he, ihr is you (plural) in the nominative case. Also, sie (she) becomes ihr (her) in the dative and genitive cases, and sie (they) and Sie (you, formal) become ihr (their) and Ihr (your, formal) in the genitive (posessive) case. Ex:

Er spricht gut Englisch. = He speaks English well.

Was habt ihr da? = What do you (plural) have there.

Ich wohne bei ihr. = I live with her.

Es kam aus ihr Haus. = It came from her house.

Jürg und Julia wohnen hier. Es ist ihr Haus. = Jürg and Julia live here. It is their house.

Ist das Ihr Mantel? = Is that your (formal) coat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

Es kam aus ihrem Haus = It came from her/their house


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoalfra

I am very happy indeed for the explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vpsingh

very well explained


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mourner

Er ist ihr Mann He is yoour man Nominative and Possessive


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SmashedFinger

ihr=you all
er=he OR it
I think.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StepJay24

So when do we use it, if the boy is a specific object?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michelbrh

ER = he and It?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlchen123

Yes. The same is true for sie = she and it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RJFan

Correct me if i'm wrong, so Sie is the feminine use of Er?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

Yes. One minor note - if it's capital "S" (not counting if it is because of the word being at the start of a sentence), then that implies that it's the second person formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoalfra

Not only for her in singular "Sie" is for plural they too; example: Sie sind Kinder (They are children).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dhaas70

I know it says boy - but I thought youngster, or child would be acceptable as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

They're not.

the boy = der Junge

the youngster = der Jugendliche (m)/die Jugendliche (f)

the child = das Kind


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S0R0USH

Does the English word "Young" come phonetically from "Junge"? I see a lot of english sounding words in German even though they are "spelled" differently lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

English and German are both West Germanic languages, and you're bound to see several similarities. The English adjective "young" is a cognate to the German adjective "jung", and both languages have nominalised forms (the noun in English is "young", and in German "Junge" - however they have different meanings).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Agustin-

As Karanbir said, they are both germanic. And even used to share a different alphabet, before they adopted the latin one (ever heard about runes?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/6autodidact

Is "This is a boy" a correct answer for this? If not why? I am a beginner and would really appreciate any help. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlchen123

It shouldn't. Er is a personal pronoun for the 3rd person singular, so it translates to he "This" is a demonstrative pronoun and would translate to "dies"

So the sentence translates to " He is a boy"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/splsurya

Why we use ein as the article before girl as"ein Madchen" , though it is used as a masculine article


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

It's because any word that ends in -chen or -lein is neuter regardless of whatever original gender it had (same for -ling, except that becomes masculine) - these endings form the diminutive (basically a smaller or cuter version) of whatever word they are appended to. Here it is from the feminine word "Magd", which means "maid", but this word (referring specifically to "Magd" here) is generally associated with the older times and contexts these days (like medieval). "Fräulein" is another example of a diminutive that alters the grammatical gender to be incongruent with real gender.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GoofRmb

what is the difference between eir and er


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

"eir" doesn't exist.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHWoods

the speaker has no discernable "r" in the pronunciation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

Are you aware that the "r" in "er" is supposed to be pronounced as a vowel?

http://www.pauljoycegerman.co.uk/pronounce/consonr3.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aahbindheim

I'm sorry if I come across as brash, but I have never ever heard this. Not when I took German in college or from my grandmother whose first language was German. The 'r' in "er" was always present, if a bit soft. It never took vowel form. Has something changed in the way German is taught recently - I know languages are subject to change and I'm wondering if that's it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

No, it has always been pronounced as a vowel (except in the Swiss dialects).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Windinmyhair27

It said Er could be it so that's what i typed in and it said wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danaixing

how could I say:a persen is man or woman


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

Person = der Mensch; Man = der Mann; Woman = die Frau; He is a man = Er ist ein Mann; She is a woman = Sie ist eine Frau; A person is either a man or a woman = Ein Mensch ist entweder ein Mann oder eine Frau;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielbeltrann

Waht is the diffrence between Junge and Kind? Or it is the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/username9009

Junge is boy, Kind is child.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/omgboromirdies

What is the difference between Du and Er?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solly700

when do you use einen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

When a masculine noun is in the accusative case. The accusative case is very simple, it is the direct object of a sentence, or the thing that DIRECTLY receives the action of a verb. An example is "Ich esse einen Apfel" (der Apfel is a masculine word, and it is directly receiving the action of a verb, which is "esse", which means to eat, and "ich" is the subject, which means "I", and the subject is the one that is doing the verb).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zelyan

I found hard to spell this sentence. How exactly to pronounce 'Er ist en Junge' in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoalfra

Er ist ein Junge. He is a boy. Sie sind Jungen. They are boys.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emperorkashief

How to pronounce "junge" & "ein"? It keeps saying I'm getting it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamzoa

where we used Er


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

"er" means "he" in English. You use it wherever you mean "he" (3rd person masculine singular pronoun). You also use this when referring to masculine nouns (e.g. "Der Computer is schwarz. Er sieht gut aus.").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PramodChin

Please tell the exact pronunciation of Junge. Whether it is "Junge" or "unge" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

"J" in German is pronounced as "Y" in English basically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hjwdhr

Must we use "Er"for male?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nibiko

Yes, which also includes masculine nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaawhatever

So is "Er" (Meaning he, I dont know if it makes a diference being capitalized or not) pronunced like ear?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlchen123

It should be pronounced more like "air". "ihr" would be pronounced like "ear". Also er is not capitalized, except at the beginning of a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jingheng0411

Ein for man. Eine for woman


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeeAlberti

how to exactly pronounce the word "Junge"? is it yoo-ger?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mGonz96

So why can't Junge be translated as Child? Can it refer to a Girl or it is necessarily a Boy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlchen123

Because Junge means boy. It does not mean girl and it does not mean child. It is the same as in English. All boys are children, but not all children are boys.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mGonz96

Many thanks for the reply! In conclusion, is this correct? Boy = Kind, Junge. Girl = Kind, Mädchen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlchen123

For translating purposes it is not correct. The right list would look like that:

boy = Junge

girl = Mädchen

child = Kind

child means basically "young human". It does not give you any information about the gender of said human. boy and girl on the other hand do. Therefore, if you translate boy to Kind you lose information (unnecessarily) and translating Kind to boy will turn out wrong in about 50% of cases (because you assign a gender you don't know). It is really exactly the same as in English (and at least French), so I don't really see the difficulty here.

The statement: "All boys are children, but not all children are boys." was meant to show that boy and child are not equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlieC8

Why use "Junge" rather than "junge"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karlchen123

All nouns in German are capitalized. There is the word junge, but it is an adjective (young)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yoalfra

So, if it is masculine we use. "Ein" junge? And femenine. "Eine"? Is it. Right?

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