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  5. "Carrie is from Holland."

"Carrie is from Holland."

Translation:كَري مِن هولَنْدا.

July 24, 2019

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HighlyRounded

Note to anybody reading this: In Arabic, the Netherlands doesn't have a direct translation. Instead, whenever The Netherlands is mentioned, we translate it to Holland, which is present.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1352

In some Atlases and Geography books in Arabic, the Netherlands are indeed translated by meaning: الأراضي المنخفضة


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Djibril487949

That's really useful, thanks! Recent diplomatic and international guidance is that we should no longer refer to the country "Netherlands" by only a part of it ("Holland"). I was wondering how to do that in Arabic...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1352

Yes. In fact, الأراضي المنخفضة is indeed a translation for the English (or more general European name) for the country: The low lands.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kozzlow

why "Carrie" doesn't hqve shadda? not كَرّي ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1352

Well, to begin with, I don't think in English they say the name like it is in the audio here. This audio is wrong (the speech machine is not good for the Arabic speech). I think in English the name sounds more like (Кари/Ká-ree) somehow with no stress on "R".
Secondly, there is a convention in Arabic to write foreign names without the need for diacritics as much as possible. So this name should actually be written كاري in Arabic and not كري. It is true that Shadda must be there but the whole spelling here is not correct in the first place. Funny enough though, كاري also means (curry); the spice. Maybe that's why they tried to avoid this spelling? I Don't know. Anyway, in everyday life and writing, we don't usually use the diacritics unless it's to avoid some misunderstanding.

Some sample of foreign names and how they are usually written in Arabic

Joseph: جوزيف
Paul: باول
Gabriel: جابريل or غابريل
Thomas: توماس
Tony: طوني Antoine: انطوان Mary: ماري

This is what my memory serves me right now. So, generally speaking, when translating names off English or other languages into Arabic, the tendency is to write them down without diacritics in general and using letters even for short vowels, like in the case of كاري.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kozzlow

Thanks! That explains some things :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Solo-Soul

There's something wrong about the pronunciation of "هولندا"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinierSchouten

How would you write Carrie is Dutch? Instead of ScottISH etc?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1352

that would be كاري هولندية (I'm writing the proper spelling for Carrie in Arabic here) - Kárí húlandiyyah.
The proper name for the Netherlands would be الأراضي المنخفضة (the low lands) but it is common to refer to it as هولندا (húlandá). The adjective for the country is formed by adding the Relative Yá ـي to the end, so it becomes هولندي (húlandí) for masculine, and هولندية (húlandiyyah) for feminine. If we want to use the original name, الأراضي المنخفضة hmm we might use simply the preposition مِن (min: from) before the name to signify a person from the Netherlands. Yet, Holland is more common than the Netherlands.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrigitteSu3

holland is a region in nederland, is not a country


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1352

Mentioned this already in this thread

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