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"أُحِبّ اَلْسَّفَر إِلى أَلْمانْيا."

Translation:I like traveling to Germany.

July 28, 2019

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatharinaM882088

A safari to Germany? Where are the lions and the elephants? At least I know now, what Safari means!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1422

Well, the "Safari" trip which is usually done in Africa, is سفاري in Arabic. However, I think the "safari" is probably derived from the word for travel in Arabic سفر (safar). So, the word here in the sentence is not "safari" but "travel" (and it is safara because it is in accusative status so it ends in -a).

Bonus: to travel = سافر (sáfara).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

When I learned that سفر was the Arabic for travel, I was delighted to realise that here was yet another English word - safari - of Arab provenance. But is سفاري also an Arab word? It seems odd to have a word that designates travel to a particular country... Oh my god, I've just looked up its origin, and it seems it comes from Swahili, where it just means "travel", which of course they borrowed from Arabic. What a long way round!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cohendotan

In fact, the word Safari is of Arabic origin: https://www.etymonline.com/word/safari


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pszemekkk

Also helped me remember the word!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MountainsMann

"i like the travel to germany" not the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1422

a bit different in logic I think.

The sentence above is about liking the activity itself (traveling), but your sentence sounds more like "liking the travel or the journey to Germany" and not the act of traveling and being in Germany itself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MountainsMann

right, but could this be the meaning the Arabic sentence too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1422

A bit. The travel in such sense and sentence, might be put in Arabic as الرحلة (also means the journey, the trip..etc)

The word السفر (as-safar) in Arabic is more related to the activity of traveling, rather than the travel or the journey itself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M1G2B3learner

This could also be translated into the future tense "I'd like to travel to Germany"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Which is the future tense? "I'd like" is short for "I would like" and, formally, that's the conditional mood. I say "formally" because it's not actually part of a condition, but an idiomatic way for English to express a tentative wish. But it wouldn't be a correct translation of the Arabic because أُحِبّ اَلْسَّفَر إِلى أَلْمانْيا implies that the speaker has already travelled to Germany, whereas "I'd like to" has no such implication.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M1G2B3learner

It's the conditional mood but it's expressing a desire for an unrealized future action. This is semantics, because I would like does speak about the future, but not in a concrete manner. Arabic doesn't have as many modals as English, as such certain meanings are implied by the verb without an auxiliary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

I don't disagree that it expresses a desire for a future action (but aren't all future actions unrealised, while they're future?) I was being formalistic. Of course there's the idea of future in the expression "I'd like to...". I was just saying that it wasn't a future tense. Let's call a spade a spade.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M1G2B3learner

For example في المستقبل، ٱحبّ السفر إلى ألمانيا In the future, I'd like to visit Germany. You don't have to add sa- or sawfa Alot of the verbal moods and tenses and aspect are simplified in Arabic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1422

أودُّ السفر إلى ألمانيا
لَكَم أودُّ السفر إلى ألمانيا


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nadjia394880

To Travel is correct. We can t guess that the action is occurring now. So my answer should be accepted

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