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  5. "مُعَلِّمَتِك جودي ذَكِيّة يا…

"مُعَلِّمَتِك جودي ذَكِيّة يا سامْية."

Translation:Your teacher Judy is smart, Samia.

July 28, 2019

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sophia_Eressea

Is somebody else using the phone app? The blanks to fill in appear on the left of the phrase and i do wonder whether this is correct (02/09/2020)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annita1980

Yes I use a phone. And the blank space is not at the right place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Thanks for pointing this out. I thought there was something wrong with me. Or with my particular phone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather746996

What do the incorrect words all mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vickyzhv

They all mean neighbor. One for a female neighbor (and a male listener), one for a male neighbor (and a male listener), one is for a male neighbor (and a female listener) and one for a female neighbor (and a female listener). Tricky one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

معلمة means "female teacher" not neighbor


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Which words?

on a side note: the audio is really bad in terms of grammar and pronunciation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wendya1

Is teacher feminine because of samia or judy? Serious question. I guess it is samia. Because the "owner" is female...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

the teacher is Judy.
The speech is dedicated to Samia (because the name of Samia is preceded with vocative article "yá")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wendya1

So the word your teacher is feminine because the teacher is a woman? Sorry I am having a bit of trouble with this one and appreciate your help. So in the sentence: your teacher sam is smart, samantha. The word your teacher would be masculine because sam is a man?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Yep. If the teacher you are talking about is male, then معلّم (mu3allim).

if the teacher you are talking about is female then معلّمة (mu3allimah).

Your-male-teacher: معلّمك (mu3allimuka)
Your-female-teacher: معلّمتك (mu3allimatuka)

If you are talking TO a female and not a male then the suffix -ka would change to -ki in the previous examples.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wendya1

Your-male-teacher: معلّمك (mu3allimuka) Your-female-teacher: معلّمتك (mu3allimatuka) That is the same in Hebrew. So I have no problem with understanding that. My problem is with: If you are talking TO a female and not a male then the suffix -ka would change to -ki in the previous examples. I don't see the suffixes, I think;) Do I only hear those?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Actually yes. It is a short vowel placed either on top of ـكَ (-ka) for a male, or ـكِ (-ki) for a female. However, since in regular day-to-day writings we don't use diacritics, we just know how to read it by context. Specially that in the sentence above, the speech is dedicated to Samia which is a female's name, hence, "your" must be a feminine one and (-ki) is to be used.

Bonus: some people, Arabs that is, still write it wrong as ـكي - and this is wrong. This is (kee) and not (ki) and does not fit here and has no meaning in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NielfaHani

I dont think the grammar is correct in 'Your teacher', as far as sentence construction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Yes, it should be "mu3allimatuki" - the audio is a disaster in fact.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaliPuppeh

The recorded audio is more colloquial than standard arabic. In dialects, "-ki" is often changed to "-ik", and the i3raab (case endings dropped).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

But we were taught in the Tips that possessive ending addressed to a male are -ak, and to a female, -tik. Now suddenly everybody is adding a diacritic to indicate and extra -i or -a. But that contradicts the Tips. Are the Tips simply wrong? Or do they refer to a particular dialect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

They mentioned that in the hints?
facepalm
No wonder. The thing you mentioned is true in colloquial speech (dialect that is) in Egypt and the Levant. Not standard Arabic.
Besides, the (-tik) part is also wrong because this would be true ONLY if the word does indeed end with Ta Marbúta ة. Otherwise, it should be (-ik). In colloquial that is.
What happened here is that in colloquial or dialects, the moved the vowels from the end of the suffix, and put it at the back of the consonant; So, (-ka) for the male, becamse (-ak) and (-ki) for the female becamse (-ik).

This kind of confirms my theory about DUolingo's Arabic course, and that is they want people to learn some kind of a "traveler's Arabic"; a mixture of dialects and standard Arabic with reduced emphasis on grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

What’s facepalm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

My bad. I should have said that Duolingo does explain that the T comes in only when the word ends in ta marbutah.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alice.aliki

Thanks for this explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

You can see lot of "memes" on the internet feature a "facepalm"
It's when a person get so tired of something and simply rests his or her face on the palm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uccio.123

TJ_Q8, you are such a good teacher. You don't happen to offer online teaching, do you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

uccio.123 : No, unfortunately. I don't think I have the time nor the real capability of being a teacher (even online) :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uccio.123

Thank you for taking the time to answer! And I hate to bother, but if you have suggestions for further learning please share. I am also working with Mango Languages plus I have several volumes by Jane Wightwick & Mahmoud Gaafar ... but the going is veeeerrrryyy slow.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Well, for non-Arabs learning Arabic, I really don't have much resources, specially when it comes to grammar and structure. For sounds, I usually advice people to check Youtube as some Arabs and non-Arabs do produce videos on pronouncing some sounds that seem weird to learners. Everything else is based on my own language as a native who learned it in school, and when I hit a dead end I'd usually search about the topic online (in Arabic) to see if I can find a quick brief answer. Sometimes I do even ask people (family and their friends) to see for any issue that I can't resolve; but this kind of an advanced case.

So, for non-Arabs I don't have much really, no more than those "travelers' books" that teach travelers some dialects of Arabic mostly and not standard Arabic. To what I see, it seems that standard Arabic in the West (and East for that matter) is taught and educated about in specialized institutions (e.g. university or college).
However, maybe some non-Arabs here do have resources for standard Arabic that they know of. Maybe you should post your question in the forum of the Arabic language here. Hopefully you'll get an answer soon :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uccio.123

Thank you so much for your time, I will certainly post in the forum section. I appreciate you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Prego :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pupis72698

Thanks a lot for your time, your explanations are very good!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alice.aliki

Thanks for your time and explanations! You are very clear. Have you studied Arabic philology or Linguistics?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Thanks :)
Not really; Mo more than school education and self interest when I got to about 30. I was a fail in language classes back in school :)
As for the linguistics part, I do have interest in linguistics in general though I didn't study it at all (along with phonology).

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