"Mi piace molto la vita di città."

Translation:I really like city life.

April 17, 2013

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/almondhoney

Duolingo says "Pay attention to the accents" if you don't use an accent; but if you use á instead of à, or i instead of ì/í they don't notice... I have reported this already with days of the week, but it still hasn't changed.

April 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2058

Accents are an open wound in Italian. In primary school (when we wrote by hand more than by typewriter) I was taught that there were 7 types of accents: à, è, é, í, ò, ó, ú. Grave accents were used for open letters and acute accents for narrow ones; but the Italian keyboard was already in use, so the other accents were already tolerated. I can only think it was designed by a French, because I can't explain why it has ç and not È otherwise. Using that keyboard has changed Italian accents a lot; it's not considered as much of an error to write E', and the slightly incorrect accents ì and ù became widely accepted; since it has no ó, even words ending with a narrow 'o' are accented with ò if needed (luckily that doesn't occur naturally in Italian). The only accent mistakes still enforced are not using it at all (or using one where you shouldn't) and confusing è and é (the only letter to have both accents on the Italian keyboard).

April 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/almondhoney

Thank you for the comprehensive answer!

Should all the correct accents be used if you are hand-writing rather than typing? And would there be any difference in usage between a formal letter/CV, and an informal letter written to a friend?

April 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/f.formica
Mod
  • 2058

A formal letter/CV would be most likely typed, so the receiver would expect the accents available on the keyboard: à, è, é, ì, ò, ù. In handwriting, I do pay attention to accents, but I'm not sure how many still do, especially in the younger generations; many modern grammars consider the distinction useless on i and u as they are narrow vowels by nature. According to wikipedia the only publisher enforcing the old rule is Einaudi, which is interesting because I never noticed o.o

April 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ceceg

A previous exercise that began the same as this one ("I like...") called for "A mi piace," and yet this one is only "Mi piace." Why the difference? I thought we always needed "a" in conjunction with the verb piacere. f.formica or mukkapazza, please help.

April 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mukkapazza

You're close. You can either say "a me piace" "mi piace" or for emphasis "piace a me" but never "a mi piace". The pronoun mi absorbs the a:

  • La borsa piace a te/La borsa ti piace/A te piace la borsa
  • La torta piace a Mario/La torta gli piace/La torta piace a lui
  • Alla ragazza piace lo specchio/Le piace lo specchio/Lo specchio piace a lei
April 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ceceg

Grazie mille!

April 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Teresinha

Ótimos exemplos! Já anotei. Muito obrigada!

October 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/itastudent

Remember, "mi"="a me"; so, "a mi piace"="a a me piace" (double 'a'), which doesn't make any sense.

October 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/misapa

"i like urban life very much" why not???

December 12, 2013
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