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  5. "مِن أَيْن أَنْتَ يا دَوود؟"

"مِن أَيْن أَنْتَ يا دَوود؟"

Translation:Where are you from, David?

August 1, 2019

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OpMax1

There are so many pronunciation inconsistencies in this course (by my estimate over 20%) that are bound to confuse any learner. I am well versed in the Arabic language yet I find it confusing too, so what chance does a learner have? I appreciate that this course is still relatively new and presumably is still being developed. Duo should place priority on revising the audio of this course. Many thanks for your efforts Duo team.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibtheib

You're a native speaker, so think of it this way. Will the different pronunciation stop someone from understanding what your are trying to say? No, they won't. There are more than 20 different dialects of Arabic, each of which can pronounce the same exact word differently and a native speaker of any country will still understand it. It can be frustrating for people learning the language for the first time, sure, but just know that as long as you get the base words correctly, issues in pronunciation like using a g (ج) or j (چ) sound, whether you pronounce the q (ق) sound and other inconsistencies are part of the spoken language and won't stop you from making conversation in Arabic-speaking countries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

He's not talking about difference in pronunciation between dialects. He's talking about incorrect pronunciation due to the computer not reading the letters correctly. This is a big problem when it happens because we can't learn the correct pronunciation of words. It is/was a big problem with nunation and other endings of the words. The course creators have fixed some of the problems but some other problems in pronunciation, I've noticed, have been created.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexKarampas

What is the problem here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuisDaniel4321

What's the difference between أنْتَ and أنْتِ? I have seen both in lessons referring to the second person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

أنتَ (anta) = you (to a male).
أنتِ (anti) = you (to a female).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miraculousladyb

If his name is David then it should be spelled David (دفيد). Dawood or Dawud may be the Quranic version of the Biblical name David, but we're not learning that are we? A name is shouldn't need translating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amina_J_

Yeah. It's so hard to decide whether it is David or Duo ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

Ah, but we are learning about that now aren't we. Look at all the discussion on it. I think of it as a great way of learning a small bit about another culture. ; )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ibtheib

Yeah, it's a bit weird because they transliterate other English names like George and Benjamin that have Arabic counterparts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eliasquiroz14

yes, but for linguistic and learning issues, it's easier to assimilate (and learn by heart) the names translated and by that, assimilate the pronounciations


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

I seriously don't think anyone is having any difficulty, or that there are even any difficulties, learning what the English translation of a similar sounding Arabic name is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodySaitoSnijder

is the audio correct? I heard "2ayna" where I am expecting "2ayn"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

2ayna is correct. If you are saying the word alone then it would be just 2ayn .. without the need to add the last vowel "a" because it is the end of the sentence and nothing is expected afterward.

The wrong thing about this audio is the name Dáwúd (David) .. completely scrambled up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

KatieC993112 شُكْرًا (šukran) while شُكْران (šukrán). Longer (a).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Thank you. I should have known that. But I find it hard to get my head round the fact that alif can be long or short, depending on whether it has a diacritic over it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Well, if Alif is short then it must has Hamza somewhere أ إ - while in the middle or end of the word it cannot act as a short (A) because this is the job for fatHa. Unless, again, it has Hamza, then it turns into a glottal stop.

In the beginning of the word, it does act as a short A with or without Hamza, the only difference is whether to be assimilated into the previous vowel from the word before or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

This is too complicated for me at the moment. I'll have to study it. Isn't Hamza always a glottal stop?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Yep, indeed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

Who is going around voting down all these legitimate questions and correct answers on this page!?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

I don't know. I noticed that in most of the threads in the sentences section, and I even wanted to post about it in the main forum of Arabic to stop this stupidity, but I really don't have time to follow up with this. I take it to be someone very pissed off with the course or someone, simply, hates anything has to do with this language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benton.1

Voting down spam and incorrect answers is one thing but voting down legitimate questions and correct answers is quite another.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

when i used to post in the main forum i faced same problem as someone used to vote down my posts in like less than 60 seconds from posting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Not sure. Actually, I myself turned off this reminder option from my settings on Duolingo :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexKarampas

Do questions in Arabic feature inversion?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/popo385447

Why does the pronunciation say "2ayna ant" when there is no vowel after 2ayn in the writing? There is a similar question above and the answer is that 2ayna is correct, but it does not explain why it is not written that way?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Yes, popo385447, I find that confusing too. However, my impression is that Arabic has an aversion to two consonants side by side, so they keep adding extra vowels to separate consonants. It's not consistent, but it's remarkably frequent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

2ayna is correct. If you are saying the word alone then it would be just 2ayn .. without the need to add the last vowel "a" because it is the end of the sentence and nothing is expected afterward. The wrong thing about this audio is the name Dáwúd (David) .. completely scrambled up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/popo385447

Thank you, I understand that 2ayna is correct, but I don't understand: if it is pronounced 2ayna in that position, why doesn't the vowel mark for the the a sound appear in the writing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

ah .. thats one of the quirks of Duolingo in this course actually. Anyway, generally speaking, when we write for daily purposes and such, we don't use the markers or Harakat a lot, except in few instances where we want to make sure the reader does not get mixed up about something.
Anyway, when it comes to Duolingo there are many problems concerning the text, like putting Harakat but neglecting some, like the case here, and also the Tanwin (Nunation), or like forcing the superscript Alif (Alif Khanjariyyah) when writing هذا and other words (such marker appear mostly in Quran orthography and it's not easy to type in regular keyboards).
So, anyway, it's not something standard or anything, it's just Duolingo's problem here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/popo385447

Thank you, that's reassuring to know I'm not misunderstanding something. Yes I'm aware that common Arabic doesn't much use the vowel marks, but I figured Duolingo should be consistent in teaching. Are you a native Arabic speaker? Is there a better site for learning with fewer problems? I see you have done a very large amount of study on Duolingo, do you find you approach fluency?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1383

Yes, I'm a native. Unfortunately though i don't know much websites. There are some people (Arabs) who do teach some stuff on Youtube but they are mostly in dialects (many people prefer dialects rather than standard Arabic because this is the everyday language people use). And there is one ... Mike Stall I think .. maybe I spelled his name wrong here .. he has a youtube channel and been traveling across the Arab world as well.

Duolingo and fluency, nope. They don't come together. The only benefit I think is that Duolingo keeps the mind in touch with the language. When i joined Duolingo 3 yrs ago (or more) I was focusing mainly on Irish (Gaeilge) only and I didn't add extra languages till last year. It does step on my nerves on many occasions and many levels actually because sometimes I do understand the sentence but when I type it in English it turns out wrong because of a word order or for using specific words other than other words; Or like in the case with Russian where I mix up Ш and Щ because of my bad eyes (and the proximity of the two sounds while listening) - Duolingo literally considers the WHOLE sentence wrong if this one particular letter is wrong.
Lately, I've removed Turkish from my learning list because that course is becoming really ridiculous in order and organizing (besides many skills are there with no tips or anything) - they literally want you to learn by trial and error which would need consuming a lot of time; A time that I'm trying to manage and to dig out to just face Duolingo and do my daily chore with it. Needless to say, I ended up feeling like learning English and Turkish in the same because I had to always second guess my answer in English (and often it is wrong). I do understand the Turkish text but my answer would be wrong. All in all, i thought it's a waste of time to do this course here so I removed it.
So as you can see, Duolingo won't be the best place to learn a language for real but something that keeps you in touch with it, while working on other resources, if possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/adjsduolingo

On my phone the Arabic text broke the ي and the ا, and combined the former with أنت making it look like this: أنتي Also, the “min”did not show up properly; the line under the م did not show up for me

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