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"L'homme attend sa femme."

Translation:The man is waiting for his wife.

5 years ago

96 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/henrydwatson
henrydwatson
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Why isn't 'he is waiting for her wife' correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Grammar rules will only get you so far with French. We must realize/realise that francophones understand the meaning clearly based on the context. Yes, son/sa may both represent either "his" or "her" grammatically, but the context of the sentence is provided by the subject, i.e., «l'homme», which helps us understand it correctly. In this context, the sentence would be understood as referring to his wife, not her wife. If there was some reason why you needed to clarify this statement to "her wife", then the French would add that: i.e., "sa femme à elle" (her wife). Let's use another example:

  • Il est tombé de son cheval = he fell off/from his horse.
  • Il est tombé de son cheval à elle = he fell off her horse.
  • Elle est tombée de son cheval = she fell off her horse.
  • Elle est tombée de son cheval à lui = She fell off his horse.
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Boatboy2

I enjoy your clarifications. Thank you

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SimonMead
SimonMead
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Why isn't " The man is waiting for his woman" correct? It doesn't have to be his wife. It could be that this scene is taking place in medieval times, and that he is waiting for his slave woman to come back from a dinosaur hunt.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJaye

@SimonMead

No it couldn't possibly be that - there were no dinosaurs in medieval times ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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If she is not his wife, a French man will wait for "sa compagne" (the adult version of "sa petite-amie/sa copine").

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Z4GWLTiG

When its possesive with man or woman, it means it's a husband or wife.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Hi, Simon. Anytime someone has to make up a story about alien invasions, a zombie apocalypse, time travel, etc., we know that there is really something wrong with the translation. "Sa femme" will be interpreted in the context of "l'homme" to mean "his wife".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/THEDUCKZBOY

Yeah i did that too

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/greeneyedbaby190

Can attend also be used for waiting on? As in the waiter is waiting on the guests?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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No, "attendre" = to wait for. In some parts of the US, people say "to wait on" (meaning "to wait for"). This should not be confused with "to wait on" guests/customers in the sense of a server/waiter.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MazenAgha

what if they weren't married just his girlfriend

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sevy694
sevy694
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That would be "...sa petite amie" or "...sa copine."

"Copain/copine" is another word for friend. When it's used with an indefinite article (e.g. "un copain"), it refers to a friend. When it's preceded by a possessive adjective (e.g. "mon copain"), it refers to a significant other.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MementoMori666

Or in Québec, "une blonde" (regardless of hair colour)!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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If they are not married, and both adults, you will use "sa compagne".

"Sa petite-amie/copine" are fine as long as they are below @25.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JShaft
JShaft
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For some reason 'The man's waiting for his wife' was wrong. I've used contractions before without problem.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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The meaning is clear enough but the contraction of "is" with nouns is fraught with problems. Usually, adding « 's » to a noun indicates possession. Yes, context will show that « 's » means "is" here but there are already so many unnecessary contractions that conflict. "He is" and "he has" both contract to "he's", but only when "has" is an auxiliary verb, not the main verb. I'll give you the short story here. The abundant use of contractions in English causes fits for Duo's computer resulting in such infamous translations as "he's a new car" and "Did you've a dog?" This is not a problem that can be solved by programming. Whenever you see such ridiculous sentences, know that they were caused by the use of unnecessary contractions and someone's effort to write an algorithm to simplify the evaluation of users' answers. The result has been outrageous.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kuba12347

the man has been waiting for his wife is not correct

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Excellent clutter Kuba. Really interesting. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to exercise my sarcasm. Tell yer wot pal, you delete yours, I delete mine, check?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kuba12347

what do you mean

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Well Kuba, here's the deal. You tell me what you mean by your previous post "Thats" and I'll tell you what I mean. Here's a blood diamond to highlight the post. (What happened to the question mark?)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kuba12347

literally what do you want from me?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Nothing, Kuba. Other than when you have a query, please make it clear. Anyroad, I didn't mean to wrongside you. So I apologise.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kuba12347

IT S FINE I APOLOGIZE AS WELL IF I MADE ANY CLUTTER HAVE A LINGOT

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joolsd
joolsd
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why is "the man is expecting his wife" wrong?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellyDavid16

Why not "the man is expecting his wife"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carolinefawcus

why is it sa femme and not son femme? I know femme is feminine but its HIS wife and not HER wife. Also, why was my answer marked incorrect for saying his woman (instead of his wife) does sa femme always mean wife, not woman?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Safis
Safis
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Sa means: One feminine thing that belongs to him/her Son means: One masculine thing that belongs to him/her

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MmeMAS

The possessive adjective matches the gender of the word it is describing; hence, sa femme. Similary, l'homme attend sa fille. If a woman were waiting for her son, it would be la femme attend son garcon.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RKSMT
RKSMT
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I use Duo almost exclusively to learn French, therefore I'm sure I learned attendre means to watch, here. However I look it up in the vocab section and it only references transaltions having to do with waiting, when if I look it up in GT, watch is a translation.

Should I expect, The man is watching his wife/woman, to be an acceptable answer?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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GT has many shortcomings and should not be relied on to give a reliable translation. Duo is a great tool also, but using it alone is like looking at the world of french through a long length of pipe (what you see may be true, but you're missing a whole lot)! In terms of definitions, a good dictionary can't be beat: try http://www.larousse.com/en/dictionaries/french-english/ . For all kinds of verb conjugations, there is www.conjugation-fr.com, and don't forget french.about.com -- it is loaded with great explanations and thorough examples.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freddy.abraham

Is there an easy way to understand how each verb conjugates or you just learn it by heart?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Hi Freddy. 'Fraid not mate.No language is easy. But at least you don't have to learn each one by heart. There are sites online dedicated to French verbs and their conjugations. French Today.com About.com french verb conjugator and my favourite Conjugation Fr.com there are many more. There are three groups of verbs: Those whose infinitives end in -er, those ending in -re and those ending in -ir. They all conjugate differently. This is a subject all on its own and is a separate term's worth of study.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/freddy.abraham

Thanks for the suggestions Jack, I usually refer french.about.com. Will check out the other sites. Cheers.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KingKlauz
KingKlauz
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Please forgive my ignorance but why can't it be the man is waiting with his wife? Why must it be the man is waiting for his wife?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

The man waits/is waiting with his wife=L'homme attend avec sa femme. It is a little confusing because in the task sentence the word For/Pour is omitted and that is sometimes the way French is structured. As to guides for this issue, grammarians to the rescue please. So, I have ignorance also.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikefromcanada

Why isn't it, "L'homme attend pour sa femme." why is 'pour' omitted?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Hi Mike. The verb Attendre means both To Wait and To Wait For, that's why. To include Pour would be like The man Waits For For His Wife.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sevy694
sevy694
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Adding to what Jackjon said, remember that prepositions never match up perfectly between two languages. A word may need a preposition in one language, but its counterpart may not need one in another language. And, prepositions never translate exactly ("Á," for instance can translate "to" or "in," depending on the context). That's what makes them so tricky to learn!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidCastr796134

In frecnh don´t have the word of wife

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Please read the comments posted above for the explanation. Also please take a look here:

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Femme preceded by a possessive, David? Or Epouse?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neolit1
Neolit1
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He's gonna wait for a loong time

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Well, Neo, when you have some experience of women and especially wives, you'll learn that they'll always Be There before you my friend. They multi-task!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric155799

Isn't that the same as "The man awaits his wife"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Yes, Eric, but Duo may not have been programmed for that translation. That is also rather archaic, nothing incorrect but it is much like replacing Where Did You Come From? with From Whence You Came?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul1381
Paul1381
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My first attempt was 'The man awaits his wife' which was marked wrongly. Is this an error, or is there a particular reason for this not being accepted? I can't think of one.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Hiya Paul. Your first attempt was indeed correct but it is most likely that Duo hasn't programmed that solution into its bank thingamajig.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ri-nee-chan

What's wrong with "the man awaits his wife"?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Well, Ri, Await has a different source from to wait for (Attend) and though Awaits is actually OK here (As his wife is considered important to him) it possibly has just not been programmed into Duo's solutions. Worth reporting it I think. JJ.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AjayNandur
AjayNandur
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Why is there no "pour in the sentence

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Attendre is of the third group of French verbs and they may carry implication rather than word-for-word translation. Here the verb is interpretive and somewhat idiomatic. This is why those people who translate one language to another in International conferences are called Interpreters, not translators.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Azule228

Why isn't "the man awaits his wife" correct?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Your query has been addressed already Azule. Please read the threads.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mallingua
mallingua
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The man awaits his wife should count as correct

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Yes,Mallingua. Duo is a written programme with some flaws but is free to use. The more who report problems on the "Report A Problem" part of a lesson, the better the chance there is that it will be addressed.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George-101

since femme means wife or woman what is wrong with saying the man is waiting for his woman

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

His Wife is acceptable, George, but His Woman is disrespectful and at worst can imply that the woman gives sex for money. Men have so much to learn, other than language. However when there is a possessive preceding Femme, then Femme translates to Wife, Not Woman..

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hagos472592

Can it not be " the man is waiting for his woman"?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Do please read these forums, Hagos, as your query has already been addressed here a few times. Firstly "His Woman" is somewhat derogatory towards women as second-class people, and implies prostitution in the worst case scenario. Secondly, grammatically, in French, when Femme is preceded by a possessive determiner (here it is SA) it translates to Wife, not Woman. It bodes one well to think in the language and its specificness when learning.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yara763387

What is the difference between "sa" and "son" ?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cecilia203378

Why not son femme

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scott495798

Often the microphone doesn't respond at all to my reply even when I know my response is correct. Most other times it works fine.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/benncm

Why on earth is "The man is expecting his wife" wrong? It's totally right.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TJB_19
TJB_19
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Your example would translate to "l'homme s'attend à ce que sa femme arrive", using "s'attendre à".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MmeMAS

I don't know why your answer wasn't accepted. All I can say is that in the future, if you disagree with a result or can't hear the audio, etc., you should report it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siri140

i think it should be considered... Although in English, we can use synonyms of that word, and it will still make total sense. In my opinion, the French are more specific:

Waiting: Attende

Expecting: Enceinte

Or, maybe it means that expecting has multiple definitions, for example, expecting could mean that a woman could be expecting a baby, and it also has the meaning of expecting a particular person to come and visit. Although, the word waiting only has one specific meaning, that that is, pretty self explanatory, to wait.

Did i help? :))))))))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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The term "enceinte" only means expecting in the sense of being pregnant. So it would never be used in the context of a man waiting for his wife.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miz_raim

I answered, "The man is waiting his wife" then it's wrong. Why? It should be considered.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJaye

@miz_raim

Your suggestion doesn't work in English. If we use "waiting" then we must include "for" in this particular case.

We could use "awaiting". That would give us "The man is awaiting his wife". It is a little bit old fashioned but should be considered correct. Although I don't know if DL has it as an alternative answer.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cassioxcassio

Aren't Await and wait supposed to be synonyms? Ugh

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Well sometimes and then-times mostly not in UK usage my friend. Sentence structure changes with each word and in some contexts the one cannot substitute the other. "I await my friend" cannot be re-written as "I wait my friend" It has to be "I wait FOR my friend". I'm a waiter. I say that I wait on the tables. I do not say I await (on) the tables.. Doesn't seem too much synonymous to me. So, although the words themselves may be synonyms their relevant phrases and sentences are not. Language, eh?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlistairEl1

An alternative answer I got was, "the man is waiting for his wife". Wouldn't that translate as, l'homme est attendre sa femme ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/King2E4
King2E4
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No, because French doesn't have the "Present Continuous" tense like English does. Well, it does, but it doesn't translate the same.

"l'homme attend sa femme" means both "the man waits for his wife" and "the man is waiting for his wife". The only way you say the latter in French is to say "en train de", therefore "the man is waiting for his wife" now becomes "l'homme est en train de attendre sa femme", but from what I've read, that way only emphasises that the certain action is being done right now.

"en train de" literally means "in the process of".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NGrrl

it should be l'homme attend sa marie for it to translate it to the man is waiting for his wife

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJaye

@Ngrrl

"Marie" is a girl's/woman's name. It does not translate as "wife".

"Mari" = "husband".

Slightly confusingly "marié" (with accent) = "bridegroom".

"Mariée" = "bride"

So the most common translations are:-

"husband" = "mari"

"wife" = "femme"

Alternatively we could use "wife" = "épouse"; "husband" = "époux". both obviously are the equivalent of the English "spouse".

This use of "femme" to mean both "woman" and "wife" is similar to the way French uses the word "fille" to mean both "girl" and "daughter" but uses two distinct words for "boy" (garçon) and "son" (fils).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NGrrl

thank you for clearing up my confusion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/George647786

cgvjbhnk

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

@ George 64 blah, blah. and "cgvjbhnk" means WHAT on a language learning course?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/abrooksie

Isn't it 'his woman', not his wife?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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As you will learn more in the section on Family, the word "femme" will normally be used as "woman" but when it is used with a possessive word (ma,ta,sa), it will be understood as "wife". French speakers will understand this sentence as "his wife".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janebuth

Woman and wife are interchangeable, so yes, wife would be correct, but so should woman.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DickPace

likewise homme and husband can be used interchangeably. At least in duolingo, not sure about spoken french.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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They are not interchangeable. "L'homme" = man (not "husband"). Le mari = husband. L'épouse is a more formal term used in administration and law that means "spouse" which refers to a person's wife. Source: Oxford French Dictionary.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/w.ruby
w.ruby
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Sexist... Urgh! Why Duo, why cant you say her man! It is just so rude!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
Mod
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There is nothing sexist on either side of the translation: l'homme attend sa femme = the man is waiting for his wife. Do you want equal time? La femme attend son mari = the woman is waiting for her husband.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mateus_Bert
Mateus_Bert
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"the man waits his wife" is not correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Easy mistake. Sometimes the English structure needs to be known: "The man waits/is waiting For his wife".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CorinnaNie

I am noticing a bit of a trend here, Duolingo. Is there a reason we keep talking about a man acting (introducing, waiting for, describing, etc.) with his wife as object? I have yet to even learn the word for husband. But from the earlier questions, I know his wife is tall, drinks tea, makes him wait, and minds his children.

Grammatically, it's fine. But is there a reason we aren't being a little more balanced? Is saying a woman waits for her husband more difficult? (This is an a total question, because i don't know. I haven't encountered the word for husband yet. Perhaps it is.)

Thanks for your help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisMurph7

I would say based on blog entries they have made that they only introduced wife as one form of relationship, the other being children so as to not overwhelm with it at first. Same reason we used red and black for so long before learning other colors. Other relationship types will surely be introduced over time (friends, husbands, parents, aunts, boss, etc)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mila891

the french word for husband is: mari

2 years ago