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  5. "Metti la cintura!"

"Metti la cintura!"

Translation:Put your belt on!

June 13, 2014

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelmutKrhl

DL mostly expect rather exact translations. I do see a significant difference between "the belt" and "your belt".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

This is an imperative / exclamation, - and it's what you would say to a person (e.g. your child) if they want the person to put on his belt.

As it is considered to be odd if you wanted the person to put on somebody else's belt (or clothes, glasses etc.) there is no need to be explicit on who's belt you want the person to put on!

You might want to read up on l'imperativo at Duo Lingo or at ThoughtCo or perhaps at Online Italian Club


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrettThoma3501

I can think of cases where one may instruct a person to wear the belt that is provided, even though the belt may not necessarily be theirs. To me, this sentence should read "Put on the belt", if only because possession simply isn't indicated by the words in the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrucePlumb

The Italian could literally mean either "the" or "your", but the whole point DL is trying to teach us (despite our resistance) is that Italian usually just says "la cintura" even when English would say "your belt". I like learning interesting quirks like this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrettThoma3501

I don't disagree, but I do wish that such quirks would be outlined somewhere, instead of just crossing our fingers that someone in the comments will be able to help.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

Why not ‘wear the belt’?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

I am not sure, but maybe that would be «Porta la cintura!».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SayginKibr

Perhaps it is the seat belt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/efrain_plaza

Porta would mean "bring" right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/osarpas

Can this also be used to mean 'Buckle up' , or does it strictly refer to a belt for pants?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiorgioYianni

The formal term for seat belt is "cintura di sicurezza".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Throseph

I was wrong with 'wear the belt'. Can someone explain why?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BampaOwl

Me too. I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MintySciurus

Indossare would be the verb to use for wearing something.
https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/indossare#Italian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina164590

I was wrong too. No idea why. "Just because" I suppose


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FluffyFrost

So some imperatives are in 2nd character form (metti) and others are in 3rd (parla). Is there a reason or rule behind that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Yes. «-are» verbs when conjugated in the imperative mood switch the second-person and third-person endings; the «-ere» and «-ire» verbs keep the same endings in the «tu» form as in the present indicative. That is why «parlare» is «Parla!» for «tu» and «Parli!» for «Lei», but «mettere» is «Metti!» for «tu» and «Metta!» for «Lei». Similarly, «fuggire» is «Fuggi!» for «tu» and «Fugga!» for «Lei».


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FluffyFrost

Thanks so much! This really clarifies. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Great! Glad to be of service. :D Di niente.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael262964

Why not "Put on the belt!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HooSteveK

This was what I answered and seems it should be correct also.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoolStuffYT

Wow, that "Metti" is almost silent!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRGB

imperativo presente (méttere)

métti (non méttere) tu

métta egli

mettiàmo noi

mettéte voi

méttano essi


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Where did you get that conjugation table? I love how it marks the stress and vowel quality!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Budd01

Would a better translation of "Put your belt on!" be "MettiTI la cintura!!"?? Mettiti uses the reflexive verb mettersi (metti + TI) rather than mettere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Please see my comment below to Bev438374


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bev438374

Is this not a reflexive verb? Ti metti la cintura!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Budd01

According to the following site, reflexive, direct and indirect pronouns are attached to the end of the verb for the “tu”, “noi” and “voi” forms, when the imperative is in the affirmative. https://onlineitalianclub.com/free-italian-exercises-and-resources/online-italian-course-upper-intermediate-b2/imperativo-parte-2/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

You can use «mettere» or «mettersi» according to wordreference. Also, this video does a good job of explaining the different verbs that mean "to wear"/"to put on."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichelleMc208450

DL gave only 'your' and not 'the' in the words to choose from yet the Italian sentence doesn't contain any indication of possessive. Surely the correct translation is 'Put on the belt'. Also it isn't good English to split 'put' and 'on' in this context. To put on e.g. put on a hat v to put a cup on the table.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karin759762

The answer your belt simply is not correct. it woul be tua centura, not la centura.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

This has been addressed in other comments; essentially, in Italian and other languages, since the verb is conjugated for «tu», it is implied that it is "your" belt. It is like saying «Lava le mani.» = "Wash your hands." Who else's hands would you wash? That is the idea. It is how Italians speak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/egregor1

Wear the belt...marked as incorrect...but is this not what this phrase means?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ceramistamarko

wear the belt, is wrong...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/colbymenning

put on is close to dress yourself ,which is reflective. Imperative for tu. la is article modifying cintura. Possessive pronouns have article + possessive tua or vostra. But not included here for your.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

It accepted my answer, and I did not use "your." It is just assuming that the belt is "yours," but it does not have to be.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marie96282

Duolingo's translation is a split infinitive. It should be 'Put on your belt'. However, this was not accepted. Reported that the grammatically correct answer should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tullio746625

fasten the belt should be correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Belgrano.1

La cintura should be accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andria390238

How can ......la cintura be translated into English as YOUR BELT. I have had a few strange translations from Duolingo this evening.What is wrong with your system.I Seem to be penalised when I am not wrong. Andria


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PrestonSis

I said "Put a belt on!" and was REjected. My translation captures the sense of the sentence. My mother, whose parents were Italian, often said it just that way. Of course, she meant put "your" belt on. Duo needs to change this one!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatReynold5

The Btitish English slogan is "Belt up" (it is also avrude wat of saying "shutbup".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guybazar

In the previous sentence "Porta" was Ok for you take but here DL found fault with "Mette"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

Lucky you. It did not accept my "Take the glasses!" before... ;(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaintUrsula

The other sentence about the umbrella (maybe "Prendi l'ombrello con te") marked my translation of "Take your umbrella with you" as wrong, but this one accepts/wants the possessive. Is there a difference here I'm not seeing?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZuMako8_Momo

No. It is just Duolingo being a bit inconsistent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DobbieWalk

Fasten the belt should also be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmopolita61

I'll report. I think "Put the seat-belt on" should be accepted (see above)

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