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"a smart American girl"

Translation:بِنْت أَمْريكِيّة ذَكِيّة

August 4, 2019

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lunacodes

Is there a reason it has to be amerikiya dhakiya instead of dhakiya Amerikiya?? Theyre both modifying Bint...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1379

Well, the common thing in Arabic is to follow the noun with the closest adjective in case of more than one adjective following. Here, Amrikiyah (american) is an identity adjective so it is typically attached first, then any other adjectives ... I think it is somewhat also the same in English. I believe "a smart american girl" is more common than " an american smart girl"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natasha633930

without SOUNDS it is near impossible for me as a beginning Arab student to grasp more complete/complicated sentences


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rodrigogar496159

But Duo also has audio and you can learn the words sounds. I began from "o" and I am progressing slowly, but sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Weaze2

What does the "aa" sound at the end do?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1379

Do you mean the ending of (THakiyyah) ذكية?
Well, this is just how the word is. To be more detailed:
(THakiy) ذكي = Smart (masculine adjective).
(THakiyyah) ذكية = Smart (feminine adjective).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Shouldn't that be dhakiyya, not TH...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1379

Yeah, I was not sure what notation does Duolingo use, so I used capital (th). Personally, I made my own notation but sometimes it's not quick enough to type and people would not understand it if they didn't read my notes about it beforehand. I usually represent this sound as ð (Icelandic Eth) which has this sound. Or maybe I would use the Greek small Delta δ for it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Ah, thanks. How interesting that Icelandic uses the crossed delta. Because of course that's the IPA symbol for that sound. It's the most logical symbol to use. But people might have difficulty typing it.... Oh! I've just discovered that Alt-0240 does it. See: ð


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1379

Well, generally speaking سوس is usually used for the tooth decay or that black thing on tooth in general, and sometimes it is generalized in use for everything corrupt and such. Also, I think there are some towns that have this name and mostly from non-Arabic origin, like Sús region in southern Morocco. In dialects, at least mine, sometimes سوس is used to note a corrupt person as well. As for the plant عرق السوس (which I find it written as عرقسوس sometimes), the name could be an Arabization of some Greek or Latin name and in time people thought it was two words and started to write it as عرق سوس (with عرق "3irq" meaning "vein"). And actually I'm prone more to believe in this theory as translating the 2 words doesn't make sense really. So, probably it is عرقسوس as one word originally and the word is Arabized from some non-Arabic term. Many names for plants were Arabized in the classical times when Muslims started the translation movement from other languages, mainly Greek and Persian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1379

Yes, I use the "charmap" program that comes with Windows to search for the character and copy it. I can make some short-cut for it but it's not worth it for the time being. Actually I think Icelandic used the letter already and it was used along with (þ) in Old English at some point, and modern IPA just adapted these symbols into the chart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

How wonderful. Thanks for that information. On a completely different subject, could you tell me what سوس means? When I first came across it in Duolingo, I thought it was the most beautiful word I'd ever seen. But Google Translate says it means "mite", and someone else, whose English wasn't brilliant, said it sort of means wood rot, or tooth decay. Is that right? Also, could you be so kind as to break down the word عرق السوس (liquorice?) for me? What's سوس doing at the end?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedroBarrosP

The arab letter that represents "n" and "dh" sound are the same (ذ)? For the word smart, we read 'DHAKIYA' (ذَكِيّة), but same symbol for the word girl, we read 'BINT'? Is there some small difference on the symbols that I did not notice?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1379

Yes, they are 2 different symbols, but the small font doesn't help.

ن

This letter is (N) and it can be connected from the back and from the front:

نــ / ـنـ / ـن


ذ

This letter is similar to (TH) in the English word (This) and it comes connected only from the back; Any letter coming after it is disconnected:

ــذ

Also, the vertical stroke for (TH) is slightly higher than in (N)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PedroBarrosP

Thanks a lot. That clarifies it. I guess I will not be checking if the stroke is higher not, as you said with this font the difference seems really slight. But the front connection should clear the doubt. Thank you once again


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatMillies

Americitun dhakitun... Am I alone to hear that, and if not, why the words have different writing that the sound?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1379

The proper pronunciation for this sentence is to be: bintun amríkiyyatun δakiyyatun [δ=th as in This]. At the end of the sentence, we can drop the last vowel, so the last word can be pronounced simply as δkiyyah.

One of the disasters of this course is that the audio is made up by a speech machine and not by a real person (and let's not talk about the grammatical and the spelling issues). Duolingo wanted this course to be a "traveler's Arabic" course; A mesh between dialects and standard Arabic.

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