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  5. "قَلَم اَلْأُسْتاذة غالي."

"قَلَم اَلْأُسْتاذة غالي."

Translation:The professor's pen is expensive.

August 13, 2019

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeoAvk
  • 1398

How do you say "The professor's expensive pen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1374

قلم الأستاذة الغالي
Notice how we added AL to the adjective غالي, and by doing this we made it an attributive adjective following the compound of قلم الأستاذة (the professor's pen) - which is a Genitive relation between 2 nouns (and this compound is defined by having "AL" on the second noun in it).
Attributive adjectives follow the noun they describe in number, gender, and most importantly, definition. If you remove that from the adjective, it will be a predicative adjective telling an information about the professor's pen (i.e. the sentence in English would need to use the verb "to be" to connect the subject and the predicative).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olivutilo

Is there a definitive guide somewhere to all the intermedial sounds that appear in spoken Arabic, like (am i hearing right) the "t" here between "professor's" and "expensive"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1374

I wrote something about this in the forum a while ago. If you like to read (and listen to the audio as well) you might understand the story of Ta' Marbúta. Here you go: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33566303


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarstenLu

The t sound comes from the ة. And the i sound after it from the genitive case. The genitive has endings -i/-in when the nominative has -u/-un.

So, with all vowels it is قَلَمُ الْأُسْتاذَةِ غَالٍي or transcribed qalam-u l2ustaadha-t-i ghaalii(-n).

Caveat: the final i-sound of غالي has nothing to do with the genitive but is just caused by the final ي.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dreifius

Which letters indicate possession here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1374

None. Because you are mentioning the owner right away: الأستاذة

such relation is called Genitive, in which 2 nouns are added together and it resembles the English ('s) or (of) relationship. So, قلم الأستاذة (pen of professor) or (professor's pen). The possession here is controlled by the addition of (AL) to the second term in the compound الأستاذة (which you can imagine it as "of the" in English). The possessive articles or letters are added to the word only when the owner is not mentioned by name, and they are equal to the English (my, your, his, her,.... etc). We don't need those here because the Professor is mentioned indeed. Like, you wouldn't say in English: this is her the professor's pen - Same thing is applicable in Arabic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/floyd-online

"The professor's pencil is expensive" should be ok also


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1374

typically, "pencil" is called قلم رصاص in Arabic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edderiofer

How would one say "The expensive-professor's pen" (i.e. the pen belonging to the professor that charges a lot for their teaching services)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1374

That would be قلم الأستاذة الغالي (the adjective غالي gains AL)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edderiofer

From the rest of the discussion above, isn't this the same as "the professor's expensive pen"? Is there any way to differentiate between these two?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1374

By adding and removing the definite article (AL) from the predicate adjective.

  • The professor's pen IS expensive: قلم الأستاذة غالي.
  • The expensive professor's pen: قلم الأستاذة الغالي

In nominal sentences (sentences starting with a noun), the predicate of the sentence is typically indefinite. There are of course cases of the predicate being composite or a verb but those are special cases for now. The predicate of the nominal sentence must be indefinite.
In the second example, we have an attributive adjective and NOT a predicate. It is an adjective attached to the noun (or in this case the composite noun or genitive: قلم الأستاذة). The attributive adjective follows the noun it describes in everything: definition, gender, number. So, since the compound here is defined (قلم الأستاذة where the definite article is added to the second noun in the compound), the adjective غالي, being attributive, becomes الغالي.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edderiofer

You seem to be answering the wrong question. I'm asking about the difference between "the expensive professor's pen" (i.e. of the two pens in front of me, the pen of the professor who charges more for lectures) and "the professor's expensive pen" (i.e. of the professor's two pens, the pen that cost more money), and not about "the professor's pen is expensive".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1374

Well in that case, is "expensive" used to describe a lecturer who charges more? When I think about it in Arabic, I don't quite find an adjective that fits here but rather formulated in a different manner or sentence altogether.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edderiofer

Changing the word order, are "قلم الغالي الأستاذة" or "قلم غالي الأستاذة" valid Arabic phrases/sentences, and if so, what do they mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1374

Nope, not valid. The two phrases don't really make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edderiofer

Alright. And I assume that you could say something like "اَلْقَلَم قَلَم اَلْأُسْتاذة." to mean "the pen is the professor's pen", yes?

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