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  5. "هٰذا يَوْم طَويل."

"هٰذا يَوْم طَويل."

Translation:This is a long day.

August 14, 2019

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bonjour689181

This day is long. was not accepted. Is هٰذا defining the day or the verb is? هٰذا يَوْم seems to mean This day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1388

"This day is long" would be هذا اليوم طويل (notice the addition of AL to يوم).

If we take it backward from the English sentence:
This is a long day: Here, the verb (to be) which is "is" separates the subject and the predicative (the predicative the information we are about to be told about or receive in general). Thus, the information provided is (a long day) = يوم طويل.

This day is long on the other hand, has "is" separating between "this day" and "long". Moreover, "This" defines "Day" and hence, the information we are about to receive is simply long (طويل). Hence, in Arabic, this would be هذا اليوم طويل with defining يوم to become اليوم.

This post I've made a while ago might help: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33483445


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

You explain very well, and you have the patience of Job. Please accept a lingot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kara5712800

Thank you for your detailed responses


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1388

Most welcome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cjmeyer96

Awaiting the day that there is consistency in accepting the answer without the alif diacritic (as in all the other diacritics; Arabic people do not generally write it with diacritics and dagger alif is no exception)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

or Amin? آمين - I just checked the Arabic in Google Translate. Oddly enough, Russian pronounces it à l'arabe - амин - (ameen). Ah no, I've just checked, and the reason is that it got it from the Greek - ἀμήν - which got it from the Hebrew. So just coincidence that it sounds more like the Arabic. But I find that fascinating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1388

"Amin" is usually used for the name أَمين (literally meaning: honest/trustworthy).
Amen as a response to a prayer is آمين (2ámín) and maybe some people would put shaddah on (M) and say (2ámmín). And the origin of the word is indeed Hebrew and I think it is short of (May God hear our prayer), if I remember correctly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Thanks for telling me about the two different "amin"s in Arabic. When you say "the name أَمين (literally meaning: honest/trustworthy)", since you're using English, I suppose you mean "the adjective"? Although, intuitively, I would have guessed that you meant "the noun" (in French, the word for "noun" and "name" are the same), but "honest/trustworthy" are adjectives. And what's the connection, if any, between أَمين and آمين ? Wikipedia says, "Common English translations of the word amen include "verily", "truly", and "so be it". It is also used colloquially, to express strong agreement." So it has various shades of meaning. The French sometimes end their prayers with Amen, and sometimes with "Ainsi soit-il" which means literally "so be it". So it seems they impoverish the language by translating it. I was interested to find, in Wikipedia, that the three-letter root of Amen are alif, miim and nuun. I had thought that semitic words were based on three CONSONANTS. Does alif count as a consonant then?? Oh dear, it gets more and more complicated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1388

Sorry, I meant a "proper" name, as in a male's name. It is an adjective of course linguistically speaking, and it means "honest" or "trustworthy". One of the sons of Harún the Abbasid ruler was named or nicknamed Al-Amin (who got into a civil war with his brother, Al-Ma'mun المأمون).

I'm not sure of any connection between أمين (amin) and آمين (Amen) since the latter is supposedly from Hebrew. It could have some common roots with Arabic, probably. The two words, Amin and Amen are not related.
And yes, the root would be AMN - the Alif here is not the vowel. It is the consonant (glottal stop). Just like the root AKL which related to food and eating, and many others. Hamza or glottal stop is not considered a vowel, but a consonant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

Thank you very much, TJ_Q8. (There's no REPLY function to your last message. How I wish Duolingo would repair this glitch.) How swift you are! All is clear now. I would find it surprising if the two words أمين (amin) and آمين (Amen) were unconnected, given that the name/proper noun means honest/trustworthy, which is not a million miles from the meaning of Amen. But you probably have grounds for saying they're unconnected. Enlighten me, please! And thanks for your explanation about alif.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1388

I'm guessing Duolingo is doing that to keep the threads from growing too long. I don't understand their methodology.
Anyway, I'm not sure if the two are connected on the roots level, because as I said, Amen is of hebraic origin as far as I know. Even though it is used indeed by Muslims in prayers (or Dua as we call it), but the meaning intended and purpose of the root of AMN in Arabic do not coincide. The root AMN in Arabic is related to believing or safety; e.g. Safety أمان (amán), to believe آمن (2ámana), Believer مؤمن (mu2min), Insurance تأمين (ta2mín). On the other hand, Amen used in prayers is to mean "God hear/respond to our prayers" (supposedly) - so the root and the meaning intended do not exactly coincide.

On a different venue, in Arabic we do use sometimes a verb related to (Amen) and that is أَمَّنَ (ammana), which means "to say Amen" and such verb can be seen in some religious texts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatieC993112

TJ_Q8, you say, "Amen is of hebraic origin as far as I know." You seem to cast doubt on that origin. As far as I can see, no one disputes that. Or have I missed something?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJ_Q8
  • 1388

Yes because I remember i read something about this long time ago. That's why I'm casting my doubt as my memory has been slightly better than that of a golden fish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pszemekkk

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