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"I have good news."

Translation:Yo tengo buenas noticias.

5 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RocheDen

How come you can't say, "Tengo noticias buenas?" only, Tengo buenas noticias.?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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«Tengo buenas noticias» is the most common one. «Noticias buenas» is not wrong but I never heard anyone using it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonymet

¡ estoy confundo tambien! ¿ Cuales son las reglas por poner el adjectivo antes o despues el sustantivo?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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There are some adjectives which we are familiar with that always preceed the noun. These have to do with quantifying the noun (mas, menos, dos, algunos, mucho, etc) Putting an adjective that generally follows the noun before it makes it an intrinsic quality of the noun. This sometimes has a poetic sound. La oscura noche is talking about the dark quality that is intrinsic in the night as opposed to la noche oscura, which is just saying the night is dark (perhaps more than usual due to being starless) In this case you are saying it is the nature of this news to be good.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/51naa
51naa
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"Tengo noticias buenas" means "I have the good news, but I don't have the bad ones", or "There may be bad news too".

"Tengo buenas noticias" means all the news are good.

At least that's what I think! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/levelledout

You can say "noticias buenas", its accepted now.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejandroLeon412
AlejandroLeon412
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Both are accepted in Spanish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBenet
MattBenet
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'Tengo noticias buenas' was just accepted for me 11/19/2017. I would like to know, though, when you're supposed to put the adjective before, and when after

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I have linked to SpanishDict's discussion of adjective placement. It is one of the best and simplest I have seen. You will notice that bueno is listed in the meaning changing category, but that good is a meaning for both placements. Of all Spanish adjectives, it is the one you will see on both sides of the noun most often without any noticeable difference in meaning.

https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/adjective-placement

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

earlier in lesson the translation for "the news" was "la noticia" ie singular, but now "good news" is plural instead of singular (ie " buena noticia") - I guess it's just one of those things but if "noticia" is translated as "news" I think "noticias" should be "newses" but I know that is not right either....I would think "the news" would always be translated as "las noticias" however so was the earlier lesson incorrect? ie "the news" is not translated as "la noticia"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I am a bit confused on this as well. I guess my question would be, is it wrong to say "Tengo buena noticia."?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Yes, it's wrong. When you talk about good news in plural you say «tengo buenas noticias», but if you're using singular then you have to use the indefinite article, as in «tengo una buena noticia».

I hope that helps

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

would that ( tengo una buna noticia...) mean" I have good news" or something else? And when would you/should you use singular vs plural for "good news"? Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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Maybe it's one of things like "buenos dias" - the plural is just what they use in the phrase (although when talking about one particular day, would still say "el dia")

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/airandfingers

Good news, everyone!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/normroosjr

There is no singular for news in English. What would it be, new? No, you might say, "I have a piece of news," but never, "I have a new." Do they say this in Spanish, i.e. "Tengo una noticia" or "Tengo la noticia." Is so, what do they mean by using the singular?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

According to SpanishDict.com "Noticia" = "news." "Noticias" = "news program"; "pieces of news" "News pieces"

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Noticia

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikepedrosa

noticio, no puede? porque

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Noticia is possible but not common. In English news is always in the plural Spanish just tends to prefer it, but it would not be wrong in this sentence. It would pretty much indicate a news item (as in not much good news) But noticio is wrong as noticia is a feminine noun.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JorgLovoll

My general rule is that extremely common adjectives go in front of the substantive

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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If that works for you, that's great. But it is a hard way to teach someone because "extremely common" can be extremely subjective for most people. In fact, I will go out on a limb and suggest that if you do not have a problem figuring out where to put which adjectives for what purpose, you probably have internalized the rules. That is, after all, how we all learned our native language as a child. Most of us spoke very well by the time we learned formal grammar. And actually what we learned in grammar class was often just how our speech, which resembled the speech of the adults in our region or social set, varied from the standard written language.

But learning a second language is generally done differently. So for any for whom the words extremely common isn't enough, here are the rules.

https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/adjective-placement

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pati747752

Good discussion. Gracias.

4 months ago