"They are simple girls."

Translation:Es sind einfache Mädchen.

April 19, 2013

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VaterGut

why not, "Das sind..."?

April 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hutcho66

Das sind... means 'These/Those are'. 'Es sind...' means 'They are', or 'There are', depending on context.

July 12, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levi
  • 2047

@VaterGut: Perhaps 'Sie sind', but not 'Das sind'.

June 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dudly

Since "einfach" also means easy, would this sentence also have the "easy girls" connotation as well as "simple girls"?

November 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erusty564

Why not "Sie sind?" Is it because the singular form of Mädchen is neuter?

December 25, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

I still can't understand why it is not:"Sie sind..." Please help.

January 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Levi
  • 2047

@jaye16 : Perhaps the sentence tries to refer to the girls as objects.

January 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luscinda

That would certainly fit with Dudly's comment!

January 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

I certainly hope not. I've come to expect better from Duo. Do we know that "einfach" is used as 'easy'? There must be some linguistic explanation, or so I hope.

January 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luscinda

The musical Das einfache Mädchen seems to get translated as The Simple/Ordinary Girl, so I don't think we need worry. I hope.

January 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolZaczk

"Sie sind" is accepted. I just messed up the ending.

March 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/richardchyan

Why is it einfache and not einfachen? When it's pluralized shouldn't it turn into einfachen?

January 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alpog

There is strong inflection on the adjective in this sentence.

There's this thing called Declension in German. Basically, it's how nouns, pronouns, articles and adjectives change depending on the case, or how they're combined with each other.
Wikipedia: German Declension

There is no article before „Mädchen“, either an indefinite article (a/eine) or a definite article (the/die). Therefore, the adjective is declined according to strong inflection, since it is a plural noun, „einfach-“ simply takes the ending "-e".

Basically, these are all the adjective endings:


Masculine

  • No article; strong inflection :
    Nominative: -er
    Accusative: -en
    Dative: -em
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Schwarzer Hund“
A: „Schwarzen Hund“
D: „Schwarzem Hund“
G: „Schwarzen Hund(e)s“

  • Indefinite article (ein, kein, mein etc.) ; mixed inflection :
    Nominative: -er
    Accusative: -en
    Dative: -en
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Ein schwarzer Hund“
A: „Einen schwarzen Hund“
D: „Einem schwarzen Hund“
G: „Eines schwarzen Hund(e)s“

  • Definite article (der, welcher, dieser etc.) ; weak inflection :
    Nominative: -e
    Accusative: -en
    Dative: -en
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Der schwarze Hund“
A: „Den schwarzen Hund“
D: „Dem schwarzen Hund“
G: „Des schwarzen Hund(e)s“


Feminine

  • No article; strong inflection :
    Nominative: -e
    Accusative: -e
    Dative: -er
    Genitive: -er

Examples:
N: „Weiße Katze“
A: „Weiße Katze“
D: „Weißer Katze“
G: „Weißer Katze“

  • Indefinite article (eine, keine, meine etc.) ; mixed inflection :
    Nominative: -e
    Accusative: -e
    Dative: -en
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Eine weiße Katze“
A: „Eine weiße Katze“
D: „Einer weißen Katze“
G: „Einer weißen Katze“

  • Definite article (die, welche, diese etc.) ; weak inflection :
    Nominative: -e
    Accusative: -e
    Dative: -en
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Die weiße Katze“
A: „Die weiße Katze“
D: „Der weißen Katze“
G: „Der weißen Katze“


Neuter

  • No article; strong inflection :
    Nominative: -es
    Accusative: -es
    Dative: -em
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Braunes Pferd“
A: „Braunes Pferd“
D: „Braunem Pferd“
G: „Braunen Pferd(e)s“

  • Indefinite article (ein, kein, mein etc.) ; mixed inflection :
    Nominative: -es
    Accusative: -es
    Dative: -en
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Ein braunes Pferd“
A: „Ein braunes Pferd“
D: „Einem braunen Pferd“
G: „Eines braunen Pferd(e)s“

  • Definite article (das, welches, dieses etc.) ; weak inflection :
    Nominative: -e
    Accusative: -e
    Dative: -en
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Das braune Pferd“
A: „Das braune Pferd“
D: „Dem braunen Pferd“
G: „Des braunen Pferd(e)s“


Plural

  • No article; strong inflection :
    Nominative: -e
    Accusative: -e
    Dative: -en
    Genitive: -er

Examples:
N: „Gute Freunde“
A: „Gute Freunde“
D: „Guten Freunden“
G: „Guter Freunde“

  • Indefinite article (keine, meine, deine etc.) ; mixed inflection :
    Nominative: -en
    Accusative: -en
    Dative: -en
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Meine guten Freunde“
A: „Meine guten Freunde“
D: „Meinen guten Freunden“
G: „Meiner guten Freunde“

  • Definite article (die, welche, diese etc.) ; weak inflection :
    Nominative: -en
    Accusative: -en
    Dative: -en
    Genitive: -en

Examples:
N: „Die guten Freunde“
A: „Die guten Freunde“
D: „Den guten Freunden“
G: „Der guten Freunde“

January 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Caradog_

Thank you! Never thought to look on wikipedia, that really helps

January 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikli1984

'Sie sind einfache Madchen.' 'Sie sind die gleichen Leuten' Why there is an 'n' at the end of the adjective in the second example and here isn't?

July 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alpog

I wrote the answer to this already ^^ (It's the big long answer :P)

P.S.:
Although it's „die gleichen“, „Leute“ doesn't have an n added to it unless it's in the dative case: „den gleichen Leuten“.
So your example would be „Sie sind die gleichen Leute“.

July 2, 2014
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