"Lasciate stare il ghiaccio!"

Translation:Leave the ice alone!

April 19, 2013

67 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maloewe

This is not English, but Duonglish ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moira490738

Try having twin children - this would not be an unusual sentence, with a bowl of ice left out for guests drinks on a warm day!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaVandi2

Indeed, what a strange sentence ! Leave the ice alone, otherwise it will melt !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nonna602151

A good message for Earth Day!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leojav

ha ha ha, what a joke!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TonyCarey2

LOL. Comments below give a plausible context, but I'd bet it's not an expression that will be needed often. Pity really. This imperatives module is, otherwise, one of the better ones in Duolingo -- in that it teaches useful expressions -- and should have come much earlier!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pizspozseng

Unolingo

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WillB_OU

Lasciare stare means leave something alone or don't change something. http://www.wordreference.com/iten/lasciare%20stare


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/musmoulay

thanks. it's a pity your comment was 34th!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marninger

If up vote valuable comments and down vote the nonsens they will eventually change place!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fran975881

Thanks for the link, a pity about all the nonsense comments i had to scroll through before i got to it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanAdams0108

"Leave (it) (to) be the ice," I believe is the literal translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoolsStone

what an odd sentence! When could you possibly need it? The poor ice, leave it be'!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joanna176476

I am a native English speaker, and I used to say this to my kids all the time....e.g if we were at a restaurant and they were playing with the ice in their drinks etc. "Leave the ice alone! You will get sticky fingers!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miles.Walker

When your mate is about to lick the ice sculpture and get stuck


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martin135869

Or when bambini are are dancing on a frozen lago, testing how duro the ice is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roadlawyer

It's when an Italian nonna tries to hide the ice from you because she thinks if you put it in your drink you'll die;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lukaperica

Or catch a cold, like you always do in Croatia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swampsparrow

It must be a parent talking to children.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bi613en

It's a global warming joke


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/abbasmustafa

That's the only plausible explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VictMe

Why it couldn't just be "Leave the ice"


[deactivated user]

    Leave the ice! Take the Cannoli!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WquDT
    • 1177

    They mean two different things. For example, there is a delivery of ice to the grocery store. You say Leave the ice here or there. You are in a restaurant and your children are taking the ice out of their sodas and playing with it making a sticky mess. You could say "leave the ice alone" or "leave the ice in your glasses"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

    I agree.

    When talking informally with more than one people, the Italian equivalent orders/requests are:

    • Leave the ice (somewhere) = Lasciate il ghiaccio (da qualche parte)
    • Leave the ice alone! = Lasciate stare il ghiaccio!

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/march

    can't I also say something like "Never mind the ice!" or "forget about the ice"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cadal99

    "Never mind the ice!" is accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris123456

    Yes, of course, this would be understood. :) But you need to use some form of the verb "lasciare." = "To leave" in your answer.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynnich

    "leave the ice be!" was marked correct 24/7/14


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcolmissimo

    "Let it be" was good enough for Paul McCartney, so why not Duolingo. Am I right in translating this as "lasciarlo stare", or is it "lascia(te) starlo", or just "lascia stare"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dr.Fandey

    Lasciarlo stare = to let it be. For imperative it should be: (tu) lascia stare; (Lei, lui, lei) lasci stare; (voi) lasciate stare; (noi) lasciamo stare; (loro, Loro) lascino stare.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruckelhaxan

    Let the ice be! sounds aboslutely right to me. Like you say, it is exactly what Beatles sang. Just substitute their it for the ice and presto!

    Leave it/the ice be! would be equally right. In French you say Laissez faire!, which is the same thing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EstelleTweedie

    Seems to be another command aimed at a busy child!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mangoHero1

    I said let the ice stay.. It worked, lol.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrissyCurbPL

    The voice sounds like it is saying" i diatso "? instead of "Il ghiaccio" and that is why I continue to get this one wrong! Does anyone else have the same issue?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Filomena8

    i said leave the ice alone


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

    That is one of the most usual English translations IMHO and it is the current main one (08/28/2019).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cervec

    why is "stare" here?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phywood

    Literally this sentence is something like "Leave the ice to be," but that would be awkward in English so we don't translate it literally.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Columbo88

    Im really struggling with this section, purely because its made up of very strangely worded and constructed sentences that as a native English speaker I couldnt imagine ever using.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

    The current English translation ("leave the ice alone") makes sense. It could be used, for instance, to warn/scold kids.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/darkpeak

    Hahha! Google translate says 'keep off the ice' which at least makes sense if it refers to a frozen pond in a park !


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

    Google Translate has evolved in the last years and it now translates this sentence correctly to "Leave the ice alone".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesWalst

    Don't eat the yellow snow


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nonna602151

    Gotta love Frank Zappa!!!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Datsune

    Lasciate stare Britney!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardoDalba

    A volte mi è difficile lasciare stare. (parfois j'ai du mal à lâcher prise) this sentence might be more useful... :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garagonp

    is this a common Italian expression?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alanvoe

    It is not an Italian idiom. The sentence is used in the same way the English sentence is used. For instance, parents can say it to warn/scold their children.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michi819458

    Maybe a practical usage of this sentence would be if two whiskey drinkers meet. I have read that in Scotland it would be a bad habit to drink good whiskey with ice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reki_desu

    Is there any chance this could also be said using this word order "Lascia il ghiaccio stare" instead of "Lascia stare il ghiaccio"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/casperwhite

    A memory hook that may help some: "Lasciate il ghiaccio" would mean "Leave the ice [behind]" implying that you "let it go" ... think of Anna asking Elsa to leave her ice palace. "Lasciate stare il ghiaccio" implies "Do not touch the ice" like in Elsa telling Anna to not play with her ice palace.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgiaRom

    It should be let the ice alone


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/malcolmissimo

    That is just one of several ways to say this in English, varying by region. Leave/let [it] be/alone. In a suitable context, it could also be let [it] stay, but I can't imagine when this would refer to ice..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mopsustherobin

    Ok, step away from the ice, nothing to see here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MorenoStagnaro

    It's an expression, here are some examples: Bene, ragazzi, lasciate stare.

    All right, you know what, guys, forget it.

    Ok, lasciate stare... faccio da sola.

    Okay, forget it. I'll do this alone.

    Penny è nella mia... lasciate stare.

    Penny's incepting my... never mind.

    Andate a giocare con qualcos'altro, lasciate stare la carne!

    Go play with something else, never mind the meat!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cinziazarina

    I think it's like the English expression: let be, or let it alone--stop fooling around with the ice!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Idanioi

    Leave Britney alone!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoFaust

    Boaaa grrr Sinnbefreit!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helenagoncalvesr

    Alone? By himself, not being allowed to play with his friend, the icecream. ..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TmAserehT

    No! Abolish ICE!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeonardBre6

    Leave alone the ice! Should be acceptable, colloquially.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodrigoHexalingo

    Non dare fastidio al ghiaccio. Lui sta guardando la tv mentre mangia un gelato. Don't disturb the ice. It is watching tv while having an ice cream


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fratellodi

    Lasciate stare Britney!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZohaibAnsar

    Yeah, the ice is not in the mood


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcialori

    Very strange sentence.

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