"Nomen tibi est Marcus."

Translation:Your name is Marcus.

August 27, 2019

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LingualLightning

"Tibi" = "of you". The name of you is Marcus. Am I understanding this correctly?

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidvdb

Tibi = "to you." The easiest for now is to remember the construction "Nomen mihi/tibi est."

The longer explanation is that tibi is in the dative case (to/for ...), and "dative + esse (to be)" is a special construction, denoting possession. Literally, the sentence would mean "The name / to you / is / Marcus.", or more fluently "Your name is Marcus.".

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LingualLightning

That makes sense, I just now remembered the declension of "tu". Thanks!

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

"Of you" is tui (genitive), tibi is dative (for/to you).

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

I think that "the name of you" is litterally nomen tui.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

If I don't use a sentence with a verb, what would be the most common form? Tibi nomen, or nomen tibi?

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t20f7gYt

"Tibi est" = "you own", so the English translation would be something like "You have a name Marcus".
Souldn't the correct Latin version of "Your name is Marcus" be "Nomen tuum est Marcus"?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jenhil0809

I was taught habere = to have (habet = you have). Also, isn't esse to be?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t20f7gYt

Yes, "esse" means to be. But "est" and "deest" with the dative is a commonly used idiom meaning "to have" and "to lack" , respectively. (I just noticed this is already explained in davidvdb's post.)

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J.C.M.H.

Nomen tuum est Marcus would be a litteral translation; apparently the Romans did not say like that.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t20f7gYt

Actually, I'm pretty sure they did. I think the main the point is that the contributors didn't want to introduce possesive pronouns here.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edmund403301

The Romans and later Latin speakers most frequently used the 'dative of possession' construction - 'mihi nomen est', 'tibi nomen est' and not the genitive construction as you are arguing. That is just the idiom in Classical Latin, even if it doesn't translate into modern language well. For example St Pacian in the 4th century CE wrote 'Christianus mihi nomen est' (My name is Christian). The genitive construction, e.g. 'nomen tuum est', is a feature of medieval and later ecclesiastical Latin (although there are probably a few Classical examples knocking around).

September 9, 2019
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