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  5. "Corinna magistrum habet."

"Corinna magistrum habet."

Translation:Corinna has a teacher.

August 27, 2019

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuddenFlameDB4

"Magistrum" is in the accusative (direct object) case, rather than being "magister" which is the nominative (subject) case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It can also be "magistram" the accusative female.
Corinna magistram habet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maishu2

Thank you. I was totally confused by those cases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Why is there no sound icon at the top of this page? In other courses you can find one there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Please, report instead in "Troubleshouting" in the forum. It would have more chance to be treated than here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/probir2

Initially was very confused. I understand i have to write magistram. But the audio dictates magistro. So the first chance drew a blanc. The pronunciation of ' magistram' should be gotten corrected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/probir2

Sorry, Not magistram. MAGISTRUM


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sato.shi

What's the difference between 'Magistrum' and 'Magistra' aren't they both in the accusative case? (I know magister is the nominative)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Magister is a 2nd declension (and masculine) nominative--HE the teacher--while magistra is a 1st declension (and feminine) nominative--SHE the teacher.

Their respective accusatives are magistrum and magistram (HIM and HER).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/giaafromig

they keep on saying my answer is wrong when I accidentally spell corinna the wrongw way but when I add in a whole extra word in the drag the word thing they say its just a typo ..?? ughhhh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GScottOliver

2020-01-22 Agreed. A misspelling of a name should be counted as a typo (if at all), not a wrong answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Is there anything wrong with Corinnae est magister ? (I.e., using dative of possession with the verb "to be.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

I've been adding Datives of possession for a lot of the sentences, I'll go add it to this one.

Added, it will take a few days for it to update perhaps. Magister Corinnae est was already set up by the way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Thanks! I guess I was afraid to try it and see !!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

That's a great attitude, just try to stick with vocab we've been using. But I love to see different grammatical constructions


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Are you sure Corinna is a "magister" is possible? and not only a "magistra".

If Latin is like Romance languages, when a feminine does exist, and when the noun doesn't have a neutral meaning (like "enfant", "professeur", etc, in French), we must use the feminine.

Corinne est un maître. Would sound weird. "maîtresse" would be used.

But "professeur" is a neutral noun in French (but now it has been feminized in very modern French)
Corinne est un professeur, would still work, nevertheless.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Corinnae est magister = C. has a teacher (There is a teacher for C., who's in the dative case in this sentence).

Corinna est magistra, yes, certainly! If she's a teacher, she is a female teacher. (In this sentence, she's nomin., subject of est, and described by the nominative/pred. noun, teacher.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NetAndyCz

So, to translate it roughly, it means something like "The teacher is Corinna's?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

Or something like, "To/For Corinna, there is a teacher." In other words, Corinnae is in the dative case. (It's an accident that the dative Corinnae and the genitive Corinnae, "of Corinna, Corinna's", look the same.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Which sentence? I had "Corinna magistrum habet".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

(For the dative of possession sentence I suggested: Corinnae est magister.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GabrielMerfort

when i use magister and when i use magistrum


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean52990

Please see the response below from SuzanneNussbaum which may answer your question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidRiddl9

The audio sounds nothing like the sentence. It sounds to me like she is saying Quabina not Corinna. I would also add that several of the audio files get the name Corinna wrong either dropping an n or adding an r.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

Sounds like "Cwabeana" I listened 3 times before giving up


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean52990

I think it may have been fixed as it sounds fine now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/varkentje123

Why is it not 'magistrem'? (annoyingly, it is counted as correct, as Duolingo incorrectly assumes typos very often in this course)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinJParry

That's not an contributor thing, it's a duo being too forgiving thing. We know it's an issue.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuzanneNussbaum

The ending -em goes on nouns (like pater: patrem, mater: matrem, frater: fratrem) that belong to the 3rd declension. But magister (male teacher) belongs to the 2nd declension, as you can see from the ending magistrum (the word for boy, puer: puerum, follows the same pattern). The female teacher (magistra: magistram) belongs to the 1st declension.

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