"Stephanus is a man."

Translation:Stephanus est vir.

August 27, 2019

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Texanberg

I am so used to certain "period films" were the actors who faithfully recite their lines in Latin, for the most part end with their verbs at the end; for example: "Stephanus vir est." I am happy to report that Duolingo accepted my answer. I read that Latin is more flexible than the format SVO!

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidvdb

Latin is very flexible. Don't hesitate to report any missing alternatives!

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Texanberg

I haven't learn how to say thank you in Latin yet... I want to say: Gratias! I gave you a lingot for your prompt answer. I am so happy for this course! <3

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidvdb

Thank you is "Gratias tibi ago." if you want to thank one person, and "Gratias vobis ago." if you want to thank more than one person. :)

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/herleifr

You just got a sentence - "Corinna femina est" and the next one is "Stephanus est vir." I'm a little confused. Is it not "Stephanus vir est"?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

Both are fine.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenIppolito

It could also be: Stephanus homo est.
Our concern is with "man" as a predicate nominative, Stephanus (nominative case) = homo, or vir. Homo as man is also in the nominative case, therefore, ti could be used; a tendency by some Latinists is to use the accusative case for "man," which is incorrect in this instance.

DL rejected the above usage, which I believe is incorrect. No matter: Vita bona est.
29 August 2019

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trofaste

"Homo" is "man" in the sense of "human", rather than "a person of the male gender".

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenIppolito

Trofaste: Thanks for the reply, but "homo" can apply to individual males. I refer you to, Dr. Peter Jones in:

Jones, P. (1997). Learn Latin: A lively introduction to reading the language. New York, NY: Barnes & Noble Books.

In Chapter Six (pp. 49-54), Jones(1997) has, as one of the examples in a translation exercise, the following sentence:

"quid homo nunc facit?" (Jones, 1997, p. 51). The translation provided is: "What is the fellow doing?

In the Index (p. 171), "homo" is defined, again, as "fellow," but also as "man."

I have no grammatical objection to using "homo," as you pointed out, as "'a person of the male gender'" (Trofaste, 2019), to wit: "homo sapiens," as the well-known Latin term for the human race, but, as one sees, there is a view amongst Latinists that "homo" can be used as a noun for an individual male as well.

All the best,

Steve Ippolito, 31 August 2019

September 1, 2019
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