"Salvete, Marce et Livia."

Translation:Hello, Marcus and Livia.

August 27, 2019

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

Note: The greeting 'Salvete' is an imperative form of the verb 'salvere,' which means 'to be well.' The singular form is 'salve'; the -te ending indicates you're talking to more than one person.

A more formal greeting is 'ave'. It works the same as 'salve' - 'ave' for one person, 'avete' for two or more.

'Marce' is the vocative form of the name 'Marcus'. The vocative is used when talking to something - like, in this case, we're talking to Marcus, and thus the vocative causes his name to change to Marce. This means that Livia is also in the vocative, but her name doesn't change.

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xavi.Reyes

I'm curious. What did you write in the last lines?

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd
  • 382

Trying to interpret the Google results for the phrase, it seems to be in Vulkan.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

It's not Vulkan, but it is a conlang. :D It's a sentence in a conlang I made, meaning "Two rivers do not flow the same direction." I mark my comments with it so I can find them again - since Duolingo doesn't have a means of searching by username and my Followed list is really long, I have to take some off to keep it relatively clear.

Case in point, that marker is why I uncovered your question. :) Thanks for asking!

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Cragius

Do you have a source for saying that "ave" is less formal?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

Indeed, because the tips and tricks said the opposite, I believe.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

I saw that, but as this comment didn't make it into my Followed list, I couldn't correct it right away. It's been corrected now. :) Thanks!

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

September 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Salvēte, Mārce et Līvia.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd
  • 382

So, why the macrons? They look nice, and I gather they stand for long vowels and thus for the tonic syllabes.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Yes, they stand for long vowels. They're essential for learning correct pronunciation, which allows you to immediately distinguish between words which would otherwise sound the same in speech, or look the same in writing.

Latin verbs are also divided into a verbs, i verbs, and two sets of e verbs. Seeing where the long vowels are will allow you to tell which of the two sets an e verb is in, so you can conjugate it correctly.

And, for me, they've helped massively in identifying patterns in grammar.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BubblegumTonks

Why is the audio so bad

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

Because the contributors aren't linguists (and obviously no native speakers) and sadly didn't ask any.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BubblegumTonks

I'm not talking about the pronunciation though, just the audio quality

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

I believe they said that the initial batch of recordings were done in an office with poor equipment while the two of them were on a work trip in Greece, and that they'll be redoing most of it.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opsfran

Should I translate the name to Marcus? The sentence literally says MARCE...

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidvdb

Livia and Marcus are being addressed in this case; you are saying "salvete" to Livia and Marcus. Most masculine words ending in -us (2nd declension) will get the ending -e in this situation. (Marcus -> Marce, Stephanus -> Stephane) Names ending in -a (feminine, 1st declension) don't change. (Livia -> Livia)

This is the vocative case, used for people being addressed.

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opsfran

ook! I get it, thank you!

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd
  • 382

OK, but that does not quite answer the question.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christos970882

Would "hail" translate as salve?

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Avē is hail. Salvē is used just like hello, though more literally it's like you're commanding the person to be healthy.

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/corvalanlara

I hear Salvece (with the c as a k)

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wolfasathor

In (Classical) Latin C always sounds like K.

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imeanym

I suggest that the pronunciation of Marce is like "Marche", instead of "Marke". ce and ci are pronounce like "che" and "chi", no "ke" "ki".

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In Classical Latin? I'm a bit lost...

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3w1W6ZJI

Well, not in Classical Latin, which is what this course teaches. In Classical Latin, the C was always pronounced like K.

September 15, 2019, 10:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThisIsMeNotYou

Why do you have to translate the name tho, like a name is a name y'know

September 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

Yes, but the name actually is Marcus even in Latin. It's just that this name changes its form in the vocative, i.e. the form you use when addressing someone. In English, of course, we don't change the name like that, but in Latin, we do.

September 9, 2019
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