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  5. "Salvete, Marce et Livia."

"Salvete, Marce et Livia."

Translation:Hello, Marcus and Livia.

August 27, 2019

98 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

Note: The greeting 'Salvete' is an imperative form of the verb 'salvere,' which means 'to be well.' The singular form is 'salve'; the -te ending indicates you're talking to more than one person.

A more formal greeting is 'ave'. It works the same as 'salve' - 'ave' for one person, 'avete' for two or more.

'Marce' is the vocative form of the name 'Marcus'. The vocative is used when talking to something - like, in this case, we're talking to Marcus, and thus the vocative causes his name to change to Marce. This means that Livia is also in the vocative, but her name doesn't change.

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xavi.Reyes

I'm curious. What did you write in the last lines?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

It's not Vulkan, but it is a conlang. :D It's a sentence in a conlang I made, meaning "Two rivers do not flow the same direction." I mark my comments with it so I can find them again - since Duolingo doesn't have a means of searching by username and my Followed list is really long, I have to take some off to keep it relatively clear.

Case in point, that marker is why I uncovered your question. :) Thanks for asking!

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I get it "Volgav" for "rivers". It's clear where it comes from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

Trying to interpret the Google results for the phrase, it seems to be in Vulkan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

Do you have a source for saying that "ave" is less formal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

Indeed, because the tips and tricks said the opposite, I believe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

I saw that, but as this comment didn't make it into my Followed list, I couldn't correct it right away. It's been corrected now. :) Thanks!

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It couldn't be informal, when it was the way they greet the emperors!

Ave greatest creature on the planet!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opsfran

Should I translate the name to Marcus? The sentence literally says MARCE...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidvdb

Livia and Marcus are being addressed in this case; you are saying "salvete" to Livia and Marcus. Most masculine words ending in -us (2nd declension) will get the ending -e in this situation. (Marcus -> Marce, Stephanus -> Stephane) Names ending in -a (feminine, 1st declension) don't change. (Livia -> Livia)

This is the vocative case, used for people being addressed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonitaGons

Thank u.. makes sense now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/opsfran

ook! I get it, thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

OK, but that does not quite answer the question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

It does, sort of. At least the answer is hidden in there. It makes it clear that it only shows as Marce because of the vocative, and that the 'actual' name is Marcus, so therefore in the English sentence (since English does not use a vocative), you would just use this form: Marcus. It's not really about 'translating' the name, because the name is Marcus in Latin, too. It's just that the name can take on different forms in Latin, but not in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

Yes, at least that is what the trips and tricks say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonbayel

Except that the Tips and Tricks are not available on the portable devices i use (Samsung phone & IPad.) I'm trying to remember my HS Latin from back when it was required to attend college (late '50's). And my knowledge of 4 Romance languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

The forum, here, should replace the Tips & Tricks. Many informative comments here. It's even better. I don't read the tips, I always read the forum.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Salvéte, Márce et Lívia.

Edit: I have since switched to using acute accents instead of macrons, as they are simpler to type on both my phone and PC, and I prefer them aesthetically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lfd

So, why the macrons? They look nice, and I gather they stand for long vowels and thus for the tonic syllabes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Yes, they stand for long vowels. They're essential for learning correct pronunciation, which allows you to immediately distinguish between words which would otherwise sound the same in speech, or look the same in writing.

Latin verbs are also divided into a verbs, i verbs, and two sets of e verbs. Seeing where the long vowels are will allow you to tell which of the two sets an e verb is in, so you can conjugate it correctly.

And, for me, they've helped massively in identifying patterns in grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BubblegumTonks

Why is the audio so bad


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Semeltin

Because the contributors aren't linguists (and obviously no native speakers) and sadly didn't ask any.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BubblegumTonks

I'm not talking about the pronunciation though, just the audio quality


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

I believe they said that the initial batch of recordings were done in an office with poor equipment while the two of them were on a work trip in Greece, and that they'll be redoing most of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean_Roy

I'd love to go on a work trip to Greece. Or any trip to Greece, for that matter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MerkApt1

Is it me, or salvete is pronounced with the v sounds rather than with the w one? Is it an error?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

That's not how I hear it, but perhaps there are multiple audio files for it. Are you hearing a female voice?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Miki8307

Yes, and with the accent on "a". Only "et" is pronounced correctly, but it sounds like English nevertheless.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bonbayel

When i learned Latin in HS a long time ago, we pronounced v as w. It is often written as u on inscriptions (or u as v).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jerseycitysteve

I can't get used to pronouncing Livia Liwia. I took latin 40 years ago and we used the then oxford pronunciation. I'm also Catholic and there's a different pronunciation to boot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christos970882

Would "hail" translate as salve?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Avé is hail. Salvé is used just like hello, though more literally it's like you're commanding the person to be healthy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Li_tap

Watching the comments, most the problem in this course is about people not reading the tip notes of lessons before starting them. Seriously, they're are useful. If you can't see it in your phone (I don't) go to duolingo.com and you'll be able to read them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aboyer02

Thank you. I'm curious. Why can I read the tip notes through the app for Spanish but not for Latin? How would I even ask that question to the developers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LastNameFi4

Is Marce a form of Marcus, or is it Marcus in the vocative case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itzamna_isilme

Why is incorrect " Salvete Marce Liviaque"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/corvalanlara

I hear Salvece (with the c as a k)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wolfasathor

In (Classical) Latin C always sounds like K.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

I think he knows that. His point is that the t sounds like a latin c


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DebF26
  • 1042

Yep, I heard Salve que. It needs to be clearer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoulingoNoob102

Who is Marce and Livia


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Who is "Marcus" not Marce. Marce is the vocative for "Marcus".

O Marcus = Marce.

They are random people in the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moriasophe

Why does Duolingo considers wrong when I translate "salvete" as "salutations"? Is that indeed wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gfldo

Hello,

The general meaning is the same since both "hello" and "salutations" are used to greet someone.

But "salve"/"salvete" is informal-ish, while "salutations" is quite pompous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaniSheep

There was a typo and i was wondering why i got it wrong, and then i found out it was spelled Marce instead of Marcus ;-;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_MemoryCore_

My latin teacher tells me the v is w......... Hmm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GroovyYasha

the new voice is terrible


[deactivated user]

    Salvete and Salve are BOTH are the correct way to say "Hello" Both in singular and plural circumstances as in Salve Omnes, or Salvete Mater et Pater.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeaconJohn7

    Bunch of BS that "Hello Marcus and Livia" was not accepted.


    [deactivated user]

      Valde triste! Bona fortuna deinde tempus! Habere unum Lingot. Vale!


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stacy611790

      The box asks me to type the Latin. It is marked wrong and the English sentence is given as correct.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThisIsMeNotYou

      Why do you have to translate the name tho, like a name is a name y'know


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

      Yes, but the name actually is Marcus even in Latin. It's just that this name changes its form in the vocative, i.e. the form you use when addressing someone. In English, of course, we don't change the name like that, but in Latin, we do.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alessandro444388

      How bad's this girl's pronunciation ahahah


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean_Roy

      Maybe "native speakers" like you should have recorded it then. These people worked hard to provide this course for us; you don't need to be hating on their pronunciation. It's clear enough to be able to understand.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SaintLeiska

      I need to translate names to get it right? C'mon.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gfldo

      Hello,

      Latin is a declension language, which means nouns, adjectives and pronouns take different forms depending on their grammatical function.

      In the sentence at hand, "Marcus" is being addressed, which means he is put in vocative case, hence the "Marce" form.

      In English, there is no vocative so we keep the "first" form (e.g. nominative), because it would make no sense to change the form of a name.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrs755260

      Ridiculus your answer


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharbelWak

      It should be accepted if he say: Salve Marcus and Livia, it is not ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gfldo

      Hello,

      No, "salve" is used when greeting only one person while "salvete" is used when greeting several persons.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jerry_is_a_witch

      I wrote Marce and it said "Marcus" is the correct answer. Are these the same name? Why did it correct me?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gfldo

      Hello,

      Latin is a declension language, which means nouns, adjectives and pronouns take different forms depending on their grammatical function.

      In the sentence at hand, "Marcus" is being addressed, which means he is put in vocative case, hence the "Marce" form.

      In English, there is no vocative so we keep the "first" form (e.g. nominative), because it would make no sense to change the form of a name.

      Although, if we wanted to speculate, we could always translate "Marce" by "The Marcus that is currently addressed" :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maxim_quantum

      I thought we weren't allowed to change the names through translation?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gfldo

      Hello,

      Latin is a declension language, which means nouns, adjectives and pronouns take different forms depending on their grammatical function.

      In the sentence at hand, "Marcus" is being addressed, which means he is put in vocative case, hence the "Marce" form.

      In English, there is no vocative so we keep the "first" form (e.g. nominative), because it would make no sense to change the form of a name.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimothyCap8

      Thp0e app doesn't accept my latin answer it tells me i answered in English


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_MemoryCore_

      how am I supposed to know what marce is in English


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/una.kov

      Salvete should be a goodbye greeting


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/una.kov

      Isn't salvete supposed to be goodbye?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bobmounger

      could the ampersand be accepted in english for and?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

      No. It's considered an abbreviation. Allowing abbreviation is opening the Pandora's box here. "And" is not long to type.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David916282

      They shouldnt change marce to marcus


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AstridBekker

      I still don't understand why a name must be translated. Why is marce , marcus?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

      Please read some of the other comments in here, as the question has been asked and answered many times. In short: it's not a translation, it's a different form (the vocative case) that does not exist as such in English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zzaHlN

      The problem is that on some exercises, Marce is wrong, here Marcus is.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

      It's meant to be that way, though. If Marcus is being addressed, in Latin his name takes on the form of Marce (vocative), but not in English. If he is just being mentioned, but not directly addressed, the form in Latin is Marcus (in the nominative, at least), same as in English.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oby244916

      Typo with "and"


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFurriestFurry

      Hello Marce and NOT LIVIA


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imeanym

      I suggest that the pronunciation of Marce is like "Marche", instead of "Marke". ce and ci are pronounce like "che" and "chi", no "ke" "ki".


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaJsemAdam

      Well, not in Classical Latin, which is what this course teaches. In Classical Latin, the C was always pronounced like K.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christophe.197x

      Why is writing "Marce" in the answer being marked down, with Marcus as correct? A name is a name.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

      Read the tips and notes, or many other similar questions already asked in here. But in short: Latin has a separate form for the vocative, i.e. when someone is directly addressed, and English does not. The 'actual' name is Marcus.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julian283557

      his name is marce, why marcus in english?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

      This question has been asked and answered many times here, and it is explained in the tips and notes, as well. Please scroll up and down through this page a bit.

      In short: his name is Marcus in Latin, as well.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

      The name is Marcus and the vocative for Marcus is Marce.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arn478969

      Names are names and should never change regardless of the language. If you want Marcus, then put Marcus. Don't put Marce and expect someone to change the persons name to Marcus.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

      The thing is that they change within the Latin language. It's not that the name is 'translated' when going to English (in that case I would agree that it probably shouldn't be done, most of the time). It's that for English, the sort of 'default' form of the Latin name (which takes different forms in that language) is chosen, namely the nominative form.

      There's no changing the person's name from Marce to Marcus. The name was already Marcus.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamphorsVan

      Pls check the exercise put marce but the answer needs only marcus


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

      It is meant to be "Marcus" in English, because that's the actual name. See some of the other comments in here, and also the tips and notes.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean_Roy

      But why do they say Marce then?

      Just kidding. I see you've tried to explain it to countless people already. :-)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daleraka

      May Allah save narcus

      Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.