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  5. "Frater domi scribit."

"Frater domi scribit."

Translation:The brother writes at home.

August 27, 2019

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariamelawady

Is Frater scribit domi correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andy353763

I do not think it is, Latin word order is SMIDAV. Subject, modifier, indirect object, direct object, adverb, verb. The verb is always last (unless using the to be).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

I don't know how helpful absolute statements like that really are. Even in the writings of Caesar, which of the classical writers hue closest to the order you outlined, one sentence in six does not end with the verb, and a quarter of those that do put the verb last show the object before the subject, and presumably many more in some other way deviate from that pattern. In the writings of Cicero, fewer than half of the sentences end with the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaJsemAdam

Latin word order is actually extremely free, but I guess the one you've described is the most common one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2611

There is always a preferred default, which Andy has described.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

The problem is that Andy said that other word orders was wrong, and used always, and it's not. Just to help people who have some doubt, from this discussion: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_word_order


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Yes, good point. If he hadn't said "always", it would have been better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorExAuro

Essentially yes, that is a grammatically correct sentence. I must say that "frater domi scribit" seems more natural to me, though I don't think your translation should be taken as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

It's all right.

The classical prose writers, who have generally served us as our models for good Latin style, tend to avoid ending a sentence with an adverb or adverbial expression, so you will struggle to find sentences structured that way in the works of Cicero, Caesar, Livy, and so on.

In the pre-classical comedies of Terence and Plautus, however, such examples abound (a quick search turned up around 20 sentences ending with "domi"), and in fact it is on these authors that many of these short, colloquial sentences that we are working with on Duolingo seem to be modelled.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

I'm told that this course is meant to teach Classical Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ego160640

The pronounce is horrible!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alejandroriano3

I've got a question! Is it possible to say "Frater in domi scribit", since "Soror in urbe est" is correct? When do we use "in". Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

"Domi" is the equivalent of "in domus". There is not, however, an equivalent to "in urbe".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alejandroriano3

Got it! Thank you very much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

About pronunciation, I hear "frater domiss scribit". Am I the only one that hear that, or is it a mistake in the audio? Or is it totally normal?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadeleineLeone

the brother writes at the house is correct as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Did you flag it and report "My answer should be accepted"? That's the only way to alert the course contributors.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fecofaz

I think if "Frater" wasn't in capital letters, it'd be easier to do it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Clues like that are like training wheels for beginners until you learn how noun declension works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Savannah746516

I typed A DIFFERENT correct answer that was (ahem) "wrong"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2611

Next time, copy and paste the full text of your answer so we can see it and help you figure out why it marked you wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathewKeen1

Anyone having a problem where they tell you to write in latin what you heard but mark you wrong for not translating?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/corhen

Should "brother writes at home" be valid?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Only if you think it sounds good in English most of the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/teacon7

fwiw, I think that's about as valid as "father writes at home."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet
  • 181

I think many more dialects of English use 'father' and 'mother' as title names than allow 'brother' or 'sister' to be so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Dialects or proper English? (just asking).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

So-called "proper" English is also a dialect. There is no such thing as not a dialect, regardless of which language we're talking about. So-called "proper" English is just the standard dialect of whichever English-speaking country you're in. Standard British English is different from Standard American English is different from Standard Australian English. Standard French of France is different from Standard French of Qu├ębec. None are better than the others.

A standard dialect is nothing more than a dialect that acquired a high status. It is also called the prestige dialect. All dialects have their own histories of development and none are "just the standard dialect with errors".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

"A language is a dialect with an army and a navy"... :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiotrJot12

And how would the sentence "brother writes home" be translated?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

As in, he is writing letters that he is sending to people at home? That would probably take the dative "domui".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henrice1

Could someone renind me what declension "domi" is?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2611

Locative. It is not used with all nouns, only the names of cities/towns, small islands, and the words "domus", "rus", and "humus". The key feature of the locative case is that it does not use any preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henrice1

Oh goodness, I never learned that case! Good to know. So domi is just the locative form of the second declension noun (as I remember it) domus, domi? If you don't mind me asking, to change a noun that fits the criteria to locative, would one just make the ending 'i' or is it declension dependent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scian4

Ev'rybody be workin' from home these days!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmkrsul

The audio for "frater" is not correct. It needs to be redone.

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