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  5. "Salve, quis es tu?"

"Salve, quis es tu?"

Translation:Hello, who are you?

August 27, 2019

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guitarmatt

What's the difference between salve and salvete?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Salve = singular greeting. Salvete = plural greeting.

"Hi to you alone" = Salve. (French: salut à toi, salut à vous)
"Hi to you all" = Salvete. (French: salut à vous tous)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

French really has a "you all"? I thought that was just an English thing!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes, "vous tous". Because there's also an ambiguity in French, between the "vous" singular (formal) and the "vous" plural, (formal or informal).
The English "you" is originally the exact equivalent of the French "vous". It explains the ambiguity between singular/plural.

But "Vous tous" (vous toutes) is usually used as an emphatic expression. An antonym of vous seul/vous seuls/vous seule/vous seules.

https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

I'm aware of how English lost "thou" and of the influence French had on English after the Norman Invasion. I just hadn't really given much thought to the French side of things beyond what I learned in school learning French as a foreign language. But now that you point it out, it makes sense that "vous" would have the same ambiguity that modern "you" has.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

gjeremy

In French, "tu" is the singular familiar and "vous" covers both singular polite and plural regardless of familiarity. As PERCE_NEIGE said, "vous tous" forces the plural "vous".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gjeremy

So French has a "you all" form. Does French also have a "thou all" form (Familiar 2nd person plural?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sue919013

In BR English we don't use "you all" , We do not have a formal or an informal you. When we translate from another language we are taught that "vous" is often the "second person plural."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luna892935

Thank you ♡ i would know that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MustaphaMondeo

the sound is odd on the first word but thanks for the lessons


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/freereflection

The letter "V" was pronounced like a /w/ by the Romans. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin#Phonology


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MatthewDaher

There seems to be an audio glitch at the beginning of the audio clip. I think that's what they were referring to.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincemat

That's right.

Veni vidi vici = Weni widi wiki

Is that how Wikipedia got its name?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

No, it's entirely unrelated. "Wiki" is a Hawai'ian word that means "quick".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincemat

Thanks Rae.F!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lord_of_Squids

I heard "WIKI" was an acronym for "What I Know Is"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/natifinn

In Portuguese: vim vi venci. Very similar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vinibem

Even I am a Brazilian, I almost don't recognize this words :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MateoMalave4

Thanks for explaining that. I was so confused about that, it reminded me of gaelic where no word sounds as it's spelled.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LDailey01

The reason for that is because the Latin alphabet doesn't encompass a lot of the sounds made in Gaelic, since it was so linguistically isolated during its creation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

Irish spelling is very regular and rule-driven. It's just that the rules are very different than what they are in English. Different languages that use the Roman alphabet often use the letters to represent different sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Letters in different languages don't sound the same. A Spanish "ll" is not an English "ll".

It's like when people says that French is impossible to read, because they apply the English rules of "letters-sounding" when they read French. French is very regular in the pronunciation, surprisingly regular, not as regular than Spanish though, that is the champion in regularity.

If you learn all the sounds made by a letter in the language, or a group of letters, you can decide if the sounds are different from the spelling.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

Writing systems can be phonetic or not. This concept does not apply to languages themselves.

Esperanto and Lojban might have had philosophies behind their development, but natural languages evolve naturally. They are not developed. They do not have philosophies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

not as regular than Spanish though, that is the champion in regularity.

as regular as Spanish.

And Italian spelling is also quite regular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Thank you for the correction.

Less than Spanish. Spanish has probably the most regular spelling (among Romance language), it's a language specially made to be phonetical. Spanish and French had completely opposed philosophy in their development. Spanish wanted to be a phonetical language, when French re-latinized and re-greekified many words to sound like an intellectual language, or a language with a great history. (but it also kept naturally the spelling often without a need for re-latinization, to be honest)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew211782

And Welsh "ll" is totally different again, which confused me when I started to learn Spanish. "Ll", in both Spanish and Welsh is a different letter to "L" though, which is probably why there is a difference between the two letter sounds.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

The glyphs have no inherent value. Each language that uses the same alphabet assigns letters and letter combinations to sounds differently.

The Roman alphabet was never meant to be used with the Celtic/Gaelic languages. Heck, its ancestor the Phoenician alphabet wasn't meant to be used with Greek or Latin. So when a language adopts an alphabet that doesn't have characters assigned to sounds they have, they have to get creative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Salvē, quis es tū?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LobsangC

Having trouble between 'quid' & 'quis'. Anyone want to jump in?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

Quis is the masculine/feminine "who?"

Quid is the neuter "what?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ollie-Benson

So why is "quid" used in "Quid est pater?" - "Who is the father"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

Where did you see that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stanislaus267322

Pater est dominus liberorum!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ESK_22

And then the owl struck


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LobsangC

And the difference between "Salve" & "Salvete".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

Salve is for greeting one person. It's the second person singular imperative verb "be well".

Salvete is for greeting more than one person. It's the second person plural imperative verb "be well".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In French "Porte-toi bien" as a greeting (it's very rare), in English: "Take care".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

Ah, literally "Carry yourself well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Is there a less formal way to say "Salve", like the English "hi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alexey914898

There is a more formal way to say it - "Ave" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CatNefE

I'm still having issues with the audio in Latin. It worked at first but now it doesn't. Is anyone else having this issue?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Please, fill a bug report, and tell them what is your OS, your browser, how it happens, etc...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/camogirl17TN

Who am I?... I'm but a figment of your imagination.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincemat

Je pense, donc je suis


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFurriestFurry

It shows you are but its are you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

It's because the hints are not contextual;


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgeHueb

Salutations, who are you? Is incorrect. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

Wrong register. "Salutations" is much too formal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xenozone

What is the difference between salve and salvete?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

It's the imperative "Be well." So you use "salve" when addressing one person (2nd person singular) and "salvete" when addressing more than one person (2nd person plural).

https://latin.cactus2000.de/showverb.en.php?verb=salvere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vtopphol

Singular vs plural. Salve to one person, salvete to a group.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Doglover425

I don't understand the difference between Salve and Salvete. What's the difference and how do you use each? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

It literally translates as the imperative "be well". So it's the 2nd person singular "salve" when you're addressing only one person and it's the 2nd person plural "salvete" when you're addressing more than one person.


Here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation

Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haytham172317

so is it always w or it can be pronounced v occasionally?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

The Classical pronunciation is /w/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunbrilo

Why is the subject "tu" being said here? That is not normal/neutral. Also, why has the word order been consistently an English word order and not a Latin one? Once, when I used a neutral Latin word order, my answer was marked wrong. The order insisted upon was an English neutral word order, not a Latin neutral word order.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

The course contributors put the sentences together, and the Duolingo engine breaks them apart and presents them in different forms. If you're asked to provide the correct verb conjugation for "Salve, quis ___ tu?" then the "tu" is an essential clue. But if you're given "Hello, who are you?" then you ought to be able to translate it as "Salve, quis es?"

From now on, whenever you're not sure why something was marked wrong, please either copy&paste or screenshot your full answer so we can help you see the real reason it marked you wrong. If a correctly written valid translation is marked wrong, you can always flag it before moving on to the next prompt and report "My anwer should be accepted." If enough people make that same report, the course contributors will evaluate it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.1fATu9

What is the difference beween salve and salvete?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2615

The verb is "salvere", to be well, and this is the imperative form. Therefore it needs to be conjugated to 2nd person singular or 2nd person plural.

Salve, Marce!
Salvete, Marce et Stephane!

https://latin.cactus2000.de/showverb.en.php?verb=salvere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vincemat

"salve" is when you address only one person, "salvete" is 2 or more people


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StellaInte3

Wow The letter V in Latin is pronounced as the English W

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