"Minime! Marcus domi dormit."

Translation:No! Marcus sleeps at home.

August 27, 2019

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angellore-Raven

I don't understand how minime evolved in no/non...

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

It was used to mean something like "not at all." Not quite the same as English "no" (which Classical Latin didn't really have.)

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

Should we report it if "Not at all!" is not accepted for these sorts of sentences?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/henricasb

I love you

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

Oh! Well, thank you! What brought that on?

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaizalZahid

He lost the chance to say "te amo"

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PsychAndLangs

he's still thinking about it

September 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Panzerwulfen

And what about Ecclesiastical Latin, is there any equivalent to English "no"?

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Classical and Ecclesiastical are just different pronunciation styles. They're akin to a different accent within a dialect.

As far as Latin ways to say yes and no, Latin relied on restating the context with an affirming or negating word.

Estne Rōma in Graeciā? - Is Rome in Greece?

Rōma in Graeciā nōn est! - Rome is not in Greece!

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

In that context, could you instead answer with just "Nōn est!" or "Est!" for short? Languages tend to favor the evolution of short forms, so I imagine the Romans, too, would have come up with a way to affirm or negate something more briefly. Especially because that's such a common thing to need to do in everyday communication.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvorLudlam

Ita

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aedan.h

From what I can gather reading on wiktionary, "no" in English was derived from Proto-Germanic words ("nai" - never, or "ne" - not), while "no/não/non", etc. in Romance languages came from "non" in Latin whose meaning was closer to "not".

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Intellectualize

Is "No! Marcus is at home sleeping." also an applicable answer?

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DieLegende2

That would rather be "Marcus (est) domi dormiens."

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

I deleted my previous comments to avoid confusion for future readers, not knowing it would delete the thread, but yes, I see what I mean now. "at home" as a complement" and "sleeping" as a participial phrase.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShanePatri14

Yes

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036

It was accepted for me in other lessons.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/War7iger

Thanks Duolingo that you havent chosen Dominic

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlCqPY

I wonder whether Latin has a deeper meaning to words like other classical languages? Like the word for house here 'domi'. In Classical Arabic there are different words for 'house', all carry a different meaning. 'Bayt' means the place where you sleep. 'Manzil' means 'the lower place, i.e. the place where you feet always get towards to easily. 'Maskan' means the place you relax and be at ease. 'Dar' means the place you stay close to and always return to. Does 'Domi' in Latin have a deeper meaning? Is it related to the word for sleeping (like 'the place where you sleep')?

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2036
September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IvorLudlam

domus “house” (domi “at home”) comes from an Indo-European root word to do with building. In English we have the word “timber” from the same root.

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

As a native speaker, I can tell you none of that is true about Arabic. How exactly would those meanings even evolve? Who puts their feet in a different building than the one they sleep? How would people have conversations where they kept those meanings separate, so that their children could learn those meanings and continue using them in their own language?

No, "nuzuul" is not just descending in Arabic, it can also mean to end/pause a journey somewhere, like French "descendre." It has nothing to do with feet. sakiina can indeed mean "serenity," but sakan means "to reside/residence," and that's the meaning that "maskan" derives from. Both "sakiina" and "sakan" are derived from a root that means "to stand still," so there's no poetic connection here or anything. And "dar" is derived from the root d-y-r and is therefore not related to d-w-r, if that's what you meant by "return." "Manzil" means "home," and "maskan" means "lodging," so if anything, you're more likely to use "maskan" to talk about a temporary shelter you adopt away from home, so it hardly means "the place you relax or be at ease." Now somebody could think up some poetic connection between the words for their own prose/poetry if they want to, just like in any other language, but that doesn't actually change the meaning or etymology of the words. Don't believe everything you read in internet memes.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GlCqPY

I know very well that in modern, conversational Arabic these words have lost their meaning, and nobody speaks classical Arabic with their children.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tsuj1g1r1

They never had those meanings in Classical Arabic either.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Solvind

Is "ita non est" for no also acceptable?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolvandenBleek

Technically, I guess it should be accepted, but I'm not fluent in Latin.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraHenry

Since "ita" means "yes," I don't see how it would be used for this sentence.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolvandenBleek

‘Ita’ actually means ‘so’ or ‘in this way’, so ‘ita non est’ means ‘it isn’t like that’.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraHenry

The attested uses of "non ita" (I'm not seeing any citations in Lewis and Short for "ita non") are overwhelmingly in situations involving degree: not very large, not very wide, etc. so the "ita" is still being applied not to "non" but to the adjective. If you have another source that shows differently, I'm always up for learning something new.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter-A

So could this mean something like "I demand that Marcus sleep at home" or is there a different grammatical mood that you would use in Latin for that?

August 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraHenry

There are various ways Latin could express that, such as an imperative (direct command: Marcus, sleep at home! Marce, domi dormi!), or a subjunctive (a literal translation of your example: Postulo ut Marcus domi dormiat).

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter-A

Thank you for answering! So could I leave out "Postulo ut" and just write "Marcus domi dormiat" or would that be wrong?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagistraHenry

It's grammatically correct but would weaken the command/demand tone of your original sentence to more of an assertive "Marcus should/may/might sleep at home" or "let Marcus sleep at home."

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter-A

Interesting, thanks for the help :)

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Minime! Mārcus domī dormit.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LightKnigh4

Oh no!

September 11, 2019
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