"Novum Eboracum est urbs Americana."

Translation:New York is an American city.

August 27, 2019

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariamelawady

urbs vs urbe?

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Urbs -> Nominative (subject of a sentence) and Vocative (addressing a city) singular

Urbe -> Ablative singular (from/with a city, among other uses)

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatrinaTheLamia

Okay... but how do I call it "New Amsterdam" in Latin?

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidvdb

Novum Amstelodamum (We will not add it as an alternative translation though :P)

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ehsan_Mehmed

Can't wait for more cities' names in latin

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

The words for the smartphone or computer will be fun too.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noahgamerrr

And the words for rockets, airplanes and cars

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Vaticanese words!

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

I live in the oldest town in Wales. In English it is Carmarthen. In Welsh it is Caerfyrddin. In Latin it is Moridunum.

When you come here, you will find all three names on signs around town. All mean Sea Castle.

September 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MorrowSol

I believe that scholars have agreed that it was actually pronounced ur"ps" despite how it's written? b gets devoiced and assimulated by s in these words.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

Yes, /ʊrps/ is the agreed upon pronunciation for Classical Latin, with a short u.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oldf1eFo

why is 'urbs' in the nominative? the grammar of this example is needlessly confusing. 'New York is a city in America' would be easier.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MorrowSol

In Latin, the complement of the finite copula is always in the nominative case. This is also the case in many other Indo-European languages like German (thus, "Ich bin ein Arzt", not "Ich bin einen Arzt".), Greek, Russian, etc. English is infinitely more ambiguous on this matter however and there were numerous attempts to standardize. We can not only say "I am him", "he is taller than me", but also "I am he" and "he is taller than I", of which only the latter two would be considered grammatically correct by many scholars (also correct in German, so you would say "Ich bin er" and "Er ist größer als ich").

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oldf1eFo

This is an excellent explanation, thank you. I wasn't disagreeing with the grammar, which is, i know, correct - i was only meaning to grumble about the choice of the example which felt as a gut instinct needlessly complicating - BUT your explanation is so interesting it really helped me to understand why it felt needlessly complicating :-)

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

And that's why. Not getting it on the first try isn't a bad thing. You just learned that it doesn't work the way you thought it did. There's learning by rote memorization, and then there's learning the reason and the rules so as to better apply them elsewhere. I fell on my face on this one too, but that's why there's a forum on it: so we can better learn from it. It is, after all, why we're here. . .

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

in my Latin class we called only Rome urbs, other cities were called oppidum. Is that not the case?

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

'Urbs' is nominative because 'est' is being used and doesn't take the accusative.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oldf1eFo

:thumbsup: thank you.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Devone966005

Why is it novum eboracum instead of novi eboraci? And why is it americana instead of americanus?

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Novum Eboracum is the nominative form. Novi Eboraci is the locative form. We don't use the locative here, because that is used when were are saying where something is located or happens. We are not saying this happens in the city of New York, so we do not use that form.

Americana is used since adjectives must agree with the noun that they are modifying. Urbs is feminine so we must use the feminine form of Americanus.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cephandrius16

How do we know "Americanus" will change to "Americana" as America was not known about when Latin was spoken ?

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

While "America" wouldn't have been a word for the ancient Romans, it became apart of more the Latin that was used in the 1500s, 1600s. And the adjectives americanus, americana, and americanum would have just been a logical way to make an adjective to mean "American" or "pertaining to America".

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chilotin

America is the New World in Latin since 1500s. New York is americana indeed because it is in the New World, like Buenos Aires and Havana, but the Latin word for "American" is probably different.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chilotin

Think of Persea americana, scientific name of avocado. There is a tradition for americanus, -a, but it means "from the Americas" (americano, -a in Spanish and Portuguese), not necessarily "American".

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ste-n-Dee

I believe the question doesn't have to do with the locative, but with the genitive.

September 5, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lavendeur

When do I use "Novum Eboracum" and when "Novi Eboraci"?

September 15, 2019, 3:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Novum Eboracum can be used as the nominative, the accusative, or the vocative case.

Nominative when New York is the subject of the sentence, the thing 'doing the verb' (or used with esse [sum, es, est, etc.]). Example -> Novum Eboracum vias habet -> "New York has streets".

Accusative when New York is the direct object, the thing being directly affected by the action of the verb. Example -> Novum Eboracum videmus -> "We see New York".

Vocative is for directly addressing New York. Example -> Vale Novum Eboracum -> "Goodbye New York".

Novi Eboraci can be used as the genitive and the locative case.

Genitive often is used for 'possession' but has some other uses. Example -> Viae Novi Eboraci can be translated as "The streets of New York" or "New York's streets".

Locative is used to specify location, where something is or occurs. Example -> Novi Eboraci sumus -> "We are in New York".

September 15, 2019, 3:40 PM
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