1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Quomodo te habes?"

"Quomodo te habes?"

Translation:How are you doing?

August 27, 2019

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

Note: This sentence uses a reflexive form of the pronoun 'tu', so literally this sentence means: "How do you have/hold yourself?" With the pronoun it would read: "Quomodo tu te habes?"

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KandaceStar17

I was wondering why the word 'tu' (you) was omitted here, but seemed to be in the same sentence recently with the same meaning ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CesarRioBrasil

This is particularity of Latin. In some Latin-derived languages (PT, ES, IT, Catalan), it's also like that. You don't necessarily have to use the pronoun. Using Portuguese as an example, you could say ''Eu como a carne'' or ''Como a carne'' (I eat the meat). Both sentences have exactly the same meaning.


[deactivated user]

    The use of the nominative pronoun is usually only for emphasis in Classical Latin, since the verb suffix already reveals the subject’s person and number. The third person nominative pronoun does carry more information with regard to gender.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meteulku_

    I think it's because one could already see the verb is attached to "tu" ("you"). So there is no need for a visible pronoun here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JinxLeRai

    Thank you! It always helps me remember a phrase if I understand it literally.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonRobinov

    The famous line of the Roman Joey Trivianni


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emmeffe90

    It's interesting how in Romance languages we don't use this construct (check, for example, "come stai?" in Italian, or "¿cómo estás?" in Spanish), while it is inherited almost literally in Norwegian ("hvordan har du det?").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

    This is because in Late/Vulgar Latin stō, stāre, stetī, statum evolved from meaning "to stand; to remain" to "to be; to be [located]" and that meaning of "to be" is where "stai" and "estás" in Italian and Spanish come from.

    Interesting note on the Norwegian.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    And être in French (old form estre)

    There's often a transformation between
    Es+consonant <-> S+consonant.
    Dropping the initial "e", or adding one.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/venustheegoddess

    We have this in Romanian. Cum te simți? (How do you feel?) Cum = How te = reflexive pronoun 2rd person simți = feel


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pablovinen

    In spanish you could also say Como te sientes how do you feel ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    But is it a greeting? I think all the Romance languages, or almost, have this structure, but how many have it to mean "How do you do", as a greeting?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaNarsames

    It looks like the verb ''haber'' in Spanish.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

    habeo, habere, habui, habitum

    descended into haber in Spanish, avoir in French, avere in Italian, haver in Portoguese, and in some form into all other the other romance languages.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    There are intermediate forms, Old French aver (and haver)

    For the Spanish, it's a re-latinization.
    Old Spanish aver (very close of the old French), relatitinized in "haver" and "haber".

    The "v" and "b" form is instable. Like the "es/s" form.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

    Quōmodo tē habes?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GerardoGar73136

    I'm a little confused. It seems that in addressing the third person, you use "quid" (Quid agit Marcus), but for everything else, you use "quomodo" (Quomodo te habes). What's the difference between "quid" and "quomodo"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

    "Quid" typically means "what"; it's more of an idiomatic expression when used with the verb agere, to do, which makes it mean "how." "Quomodo" is the more typical word for "how."

    Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    Mod
    Plus
    • 2611

    "Quid agis?" is literally "What are you doing?" but is idiomatically used to mean "How are you doing?"

    "Quomodo te habes?" is literally "How do you hold yourself?" but is idiomatically used to mean "How are you doing?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meteulku_

    Is "How do you feel?" acceptable?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    It was accepted, but in my opinion, they shouldn't if it's a greeting (and primarily a greeting, like "How are you?" is primarily a greeting.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

    Quomodo te habes? Me bene habeo!
    Quomodo se habet? Se bene habet!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrodToward

    Wie viele Sprachen kannst du?

    Die Liste sieht sehr imposant aus!


    [deactivated user]

      Why are the long vowels not being used in the speech examples, please? Anyone else feeling the lack of the correct vowel sounds?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ilchymis

      Does habes also apply if ' te' was the plural 'you'?


      [deactivated user]

        vos habetis (you hold yourselves)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZeynepBeld

        Habes / habet what is the different?


        [deactivated user]

          habes =you have (singular); habet = he/she /it has


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

          What is the difference*


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomRDA

          Is this more common than "quid agis"? I guess "quid agis" means litteraly how are you but "quomodo te habes" means how do you hold yourself. Which is more common.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
          Mod
          Plus
          • 2611

          "Quid agis" is literally "What are you doing". Both are idiomatic.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aegidius2

          Cur non "Ut vales ?"


          [deactivated user]

            “That you be well” usually appears with the imperative “Take care!” - cura ut valeas (subjunctive after ut).


            [deactivated user]

              Is "how do you do?" possible?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              I don't think so. "How do you do?" can only be a greeting (what's called a phatic expression). "How are you doing?" can be used as a greeting, but it is also used literally to inquire into someone's health and well-being. Until we know whether "Quomodo te habes" and "Quid agis" can be used in Latin instead of "Salve", it's best to stay as literal as possible.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

              This one is very confusing. I'd like to have the confirmation that "Quomodo te habes" is rather a greeting than an inquiry about how a person feel. Or if it could mean both.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              Je suis d'accord.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasMcGr9

              If I wanted to use the plural “you,” would this be a correct translation: “Quomodo vos habetis?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrienne332908

              Is 'how are you keeping' not valid as a translation here??


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              Because it is not in common enough usage to warrant an entry in the answer database.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

              It's impossible to add all the slang or very informal variants for "how are you" existing in the English speaking words. It would take one year, only doing that task, and nothing else.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              "How are you keeping?" is not slang or informal, it is a regional variation, and in some places, archaic.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              The register is far too informal to be an appropriate translation.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3PDy4

              Hi! In tutorial:

              2) Quomodo + se + habeo? -> Quomodo te habes? Literally, this means "How do you have yourself/How do you feel?"

              but in test:

              "Quomodo te habes?" Translation:How are you doing?

              Where is a mistake?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              The Latin is literally "How do you have yourself?" or "How do you hold yourself?"

              The English equivalent is:
              "How are you?"
              "How are you doing?"
              "How are you feeling?"
              "How do you feel?"


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iMwxGcrJ

              I put "How do you feel". Is this also correct?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HayaaBeig

              I translated 'habes' into faring, which I thought was a synonym for doing, only it was marked wrong. Was I incorrect?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              It's a little archaic, which is probably why the course contributors did not include that in the answer database.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AubreyMaus1

              Don't "Quomodo" and "Te Habes" mean the same thing. If so than why are they in the same sentence? Wouldn't that be like saying "How are you doing How are you doing?" ????.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              No, not at all.

              "Quomodo" is "how", literally "in what way".
              https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/quomodo#Latin

              "Te habes" is literally "you hold yourself".


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/revandiel2209

              Can we change to habesne?


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              No. That's only for yes-no questions. The -ne is the part that asks the question. Here, the question word is "quomodo".


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CoralLorna

              I wonder why Duolingo marks me right when I use the preposition" tu te "when I address the person by name such as" livia quomodo tu te habes" rather than. " quomodo te habes" when I simply ask "how are you ? . Thank you duolingo I think I am enjoying this latin course best of all!


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              Those aren't prepositions. "Tu" is the optional subject pronoun and "te" is the required reflexive pronoun.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudithAldrich

              I put 'how are you feeling' and it was rejected...


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LadyLoki420

              I'm pretty sure if I put 'are you feeling well?' it's the same type of phrase especially to the British. Jist something to consider


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LobsangC

              I tried: "How are you holding up?", but got marked wrong; don't think "How's it hanging?" would have worked either, although both the above seem to be close literally, and the meanings are close, but not cigar from Duo...


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
              Mod
              Plus
              • 2611

              Literally-literally, the Latin is "How do you hold yourself?"

              Your translation is much too informal. The most appropriate translation is "How are you?" or "How are you doing?"


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MBH3691

              Mods:please change the latin course to not have a capital letter at the start of the sentence. This is not how latin works. Unless it is a proper noun, the beginning of the sentence is lowercase.


              https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

              They don't check the forum to know how to improve the course. This forum is only for the help between users.

              And second, I really disagree with you, because if you want to remove the capital letters because Latin didn't have, remove also the space between the words, and the stop at the end of the sentences.
              The Latin didn't have uppercase for proper nouns.

              sorrybutidontwanttolearnalatinthatlookslikethisitsimpossibleforusmodernuserstounderstand
              with·interpoints·it·s·a·bit·easier·but·it·hurts·my·brain·a·lot


              [deactivated user]

                Except that Classical Latin had only the capital letters. Minuscules were invented around 800AD. The idea of mixing majuscules with minuscules came even later. This said, I follow the tradition whereby only proper nouns are capitalized, but I don’t get worked up about capitals being used elsewhere as well.


                https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
                Mod
                Plus
                • 2611

                The course contributors are not notified of comments in this learner's forum. Your message was not delivered.

                The way this course is presented, it incorporates such niceties as small letters in addition to capital letters, the distinction between u and v, spaces between words, and punctuation.

                If this is not the version of Latin you want to learn, feel free to find a different course elsewhere.

                Related Discussions

                Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.