1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Latin
  4. >
  5. "Corinna does not sleep at ho…

"Corinna does not sleep at home."

Translation:Corinna domi non dormit.

August 27, 2019

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

I put "Corinna dormit non domi" and it was wrong. I really have no idea what order to put the words in. One time we are told it doesn't matter and then it is wrong anyway...sigh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshuaDona466833

'Non' still has to precede the verb, whether or not the object gets in between


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

"Word order in Latin doesn't matter" is a myth. "Free" word order is a misnomer. It is merely relatively flexible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jagannek

Where do you put the "non"/negation in a standard SOV sentence in latin? Is SNOV or SONV more natural? Or does it rather depend on the bit thats negated (like in this sentence that Corinna sleeps but not at home or that she is at home but doesn't sleep there)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

I can't go into detail because I'm still learning myself, but apparently "non" specifically negates the verb and therefore does not have to be adjacent to it. Nouns get their own negation, which (assuming they typed it right and I'm remembering it right) is "nella", and the specific form might vary depending on the gender/declension system of the noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heather.Shaw

I think this needs to be stressed in the notes. These sentences in English could go either way 'not at home' 'not sleeping' 'not in the city' 'not studying'. Are Livia and Corinna party animals or is Corinna an insomniac and Livia suffering under lock down and unable to go to Uni?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PastaPalPasta

Why "Corinna in domi non dormit" isnt correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

Because "domi" is in the locative case and does not take any preposition.


Here is a plain-English overview of what the cases are and how they work:
Latin cases, in English

Here are the noun and adjective declension charts:
declensions 1-3
declensions 4&5

Adjectives must agree in gender, number, and case with the nouns they modify, but they have their own declensions. Sometimes you get lucky and the adjective just happens to follow the same declension as the noun, but that is not a guarantee.

For good measure, here are the verb conjugation charts:
1st Conjugation
2nd Conjugation
3rd Conjugation
3rd i-stem Conjugation
4th Conjugation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neerbas7

How do you know the order of words in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

Latin is Subject-Object-Verb at the top level. Adjectives generally come after nouns, although it's not wrong to put them before. Adverbs come before verbs.

So the first word must be "Corinna" and the last word must be "dormit". In the middle, "non" and "domi" are flexible because even though "domi" is the locative form of the noun "domus", it's functioning adverbially to say where she is sleeping.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/takuuwu

How is the sentence construction in Latin? I really didn't undestand. I thought that's ''Corina non dormit in domi'' Latin is an interesting language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
Plus
  • 2611

It's just different from what you're used to.

Latin is typically subject-object-verb. Adjectives generally go after nouns, adverbs and adverbial phrases generally go before verbs.

The names of cities, towns, and small islands, along with a handful of common nouns such as "domus" and "rus" have a case called "locative", which means you don't use the preposition "in" with them.

Corinna domi non dormit.

Learn Latin in just 5 minutes a day. For free.