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"The women are not in the city."

Translation:Feminae in urbe non sunt.

August 27, 2019

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XJDPe

Why do we need "in" if urbs is changed to urbe? Other sentences in the course do away with "in". such as Marcus Novi Eboraci habitat. It seems "in" sticks with America too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

The short answer is that urbe is in the Ablative Case whereas Novi Eboraci is in the Locative Case, and those cases do different things.

The Ablative Case, without a preposition, does a LOT of things. It acts adverbially, usually.

But, in fact, in the case of small towns and other places that actually take the Locative Case (and there are not many), the Ablative actually indicates motion away from:

Romā veniō I am coming from Rome.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XJDPe

Thank you, this does clear some things up. I am not used to ablative and locative cases. Russian has six cases but those two are not used.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eric710700

it's interesting how many of the romance languages developed a differential verb for permanent and temporary states of being but latin doesn't seem to have that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

You can see it in late Latin. Stare (to stand) becomes great for locations ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tzznandrew

And it's from Late/Vulgar Latin that ALL the Romance languages spring from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ampus_Questor

What is life if not full of care We have no time to stand and stare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeadAccount.

Is "Feminae sunt non in urbe" correct? Maybe I'm just being stupid, but i thought word order didn't matter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Word order does matter. It is more flexible than it is in English, but it is not a free-for-all.

The "non" belongs before the "sunt" and unless the sentence is "X = Y", the tendency is for the verb to be last.

"Feminae in urbe non sunt" or even "Feminae non in urbe sunt" are okay, but "sunt non" is English, not Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkSideoftheHan

Does "non" always go before "sunt", or are there exceptions?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alec147169

Wouldnt "Feminae in urbe non sunt" be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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  • 2608

That is also a valid answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jjbaroff

I put "In urbe feminae non sunt", because I'm trying to see when word order matters and when it does not. Duolingo marked it as wrong, but it's in beta. Is that me being wrong or Duolingo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
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  • 2608

In absolute terms, what you wrote was probably valid and you could flag it and report "My answer should be accepted."

Bear in mind that "free word order" is a misnomer. Word order does matter. Latin has relatively flexible word order, although there is a default and other orders serve to put emphasis on whatever gets fronted. So what you wrote would be kind of like saying "The women are not in the city."

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