"Salve, Marce."

Translation:Hello, Marcus.

August 27, 2019

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jairapetyan

Okay so I understand there is some sort of inflection on the name Marcus. This also explains why the team is not inputting anglicized names as acceptable solutions. I hope we will eventually get some tips and notes soon for the inflections. At any rate I am so grateful they got this course up and running!

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShanePatri14

Marce is in the vocative case. It is used for direct address. With names ending in "us", the vocative ending is "e". So, for example, Titus becomes Tite, Quintus becomes Quinte, etc.

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Yes, and a few are even stranger, like Gaius becoming Gai

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ARCANA-MVSA

The inflection is the vocative case. We're talking to Marcus, and since his name is masculine (ending in -us), it changes to Marce in the vocative. :)

Volgav vitsenanieff nivya kevach varatsach.

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alan778044

But surely since those inflections don't happen in English (or the English translation duo gives), it shouldn't be s problem to translate the name.. We'd never translate a latin text referring to 'Sanctus Marcus' without translating that to 'St Mark', after all.

That's my opinion anyway.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mreaderclt

Somewhere in the notes, I think I read that the course creators decided that they would not translate the names, but stick with the Latin nominative. (Also in another place in this discussion: See Danielconcasco's answer to Kyle202572.)

There's no declension for names in English. So, it makes sense to stick with nominative.

I would also guess that they have enough on their plates without trying to add all the different ways that a once simple name can now be rendered in English.

In English, the spelling of names is inconsistent. Parents might stray from a common spelling to make a name seem more unique.

We also have adopted, sometimes with modifications, many versions of names from other languages.

Even though Mark seems pretty straightforward, there is also Marc, Marco, Marko, Marcus, Markus, Marquiss, Marquess, Marquise, etc. I think I've known at least one of each.

The last three may actually come from the hereditary title "Marquess." However, the "Marquiss"and "Marquess" that I knew both pronounced it just like "Marcus," and I'm not sure what their parents intended.

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mreaderclt

And here is another, fuller explanation about declension. I'll just copy and paste directly (link at end):

««« quote below »»»

Imagine that this is a text you need to translate into English:

Marcus vir est. Marcum amo. Marco rosam do. Salve, Marce!

(Marcus is a man. I love Marcus. I give Marcus a rose. Hi, Marcus!)

Marcus, Marcum, Marco, and Marce are all referring to the same person (Marcus). Using the different forms in English would only cause confusion, so no, we don't carry the vocative form over into English.

««« end quote »»»

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/33819318

September 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maughanster_

Is this the vocative case?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Marce is Vocative, yes.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphabeta

I guess this will come up over and over again, but the pronunciation of v is different between classical (i.e. reconstructed) and ecclesiastical (Catholic, continued beyond the fall of the Roman Empire up until the present day). Classical uses a "w" sound, ecclesiastical uses a "v" sound.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Charleswor11

So much love for the extra info the community provides, you guys are the best. ❤

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyle202572

I know the translation is 1=1 but, they really won't accept "Marce" in English? It has to be "Marcus"?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Names change based on what they do in the sentence, Marcus, Marci, Marco, Marcum, but they are always returned to Marcus in English.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

So, since c is pronounced as k before e, the course uses the classic pronunciation (in Mediaeval Latin it would be "ts").

Shouldn't the l sound be pronounced like the l in modern German or Italian (or like the English one in "leaf, believe")?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/The9

I believe C is always pronounced like K in classical Latin.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Yes, with a Classical pronunciation it will always be a K sound.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eey91

Which other standard pronunciation is there besides classic?

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Ecclesiastical

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

Yes, Caesar was "kesar" or (earlier) "kaisar", not "sezar", "chezar" etc.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

The salve sounds fine to me.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

I have read about the L in Latin, it did have two allophones [l] and [ɫ]. So you are right about it in salve, sorry.

(I was taught that the Latin L should always be pronounced as a Slavic palatalized [lʲ], but the correct sound was supposed to be alveolar like in German - the Slavic regional pronunciation of Latin is based on the German one. In fact, I knew about most of the phonetical differences between Classical Latin and its Medieval and modern varieties but never heard about the two allophones of L before).

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langenth

I agree, I think it's too retroflexed.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Langenth

I hope the voices assigned for the Latin course are not anyhow Germanic-influenced. :D

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AARONRBAYL

In Church Latin (The form of Latin that is a living language,) C is pronounced as "Ch" when it comes before e,i,ae,oe, otherwise it is pronounced as K. I "Reconstructed" Classical Latin it is always pronounced as K. The same holds for the letter G.

September 9, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batgris

Why salve and not salvete?

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Salve is for addressing one person (Marcus in this case) and salvete is for a group.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CalvinCa

May i ask what's the difference between salve and salvete and how to use it right? #newlearner

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Answered right above

September 12, 2019
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