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  5. "Filii mei Romae habitant."

"Filii mei Romae habitant."

Translation:My sons live in Rome.

August 27, 2019

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YuriZoria

In the audio, the final i's are pronounced as separate words in both filii and mei, which is wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

Yes, you are quite right. There are no glottal stops (a glottal stop being that gap in the middle of "uh-oh") in Latin, except, I would guess, in the traditional German pronunciation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OranGilboa

Why is there an e at the end of Roma?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Quidam_Homo

Roma = Rome Romae = in Rome


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pablo611443

I hate myself, it looks like i'll never learn latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rose528361

The person who voiced this sentence should be fired


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kasiaci

I'm not sure they are being paid for that's one thing. The other is that no one is 100% sure how to pronounce Latin. It's all just an educated guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErwinOlie

I doubt myself a little with this one. Is 'mei' genitive and 'filii' nominative in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShanePatri14

Mei is the masculine nominative plural form of the adjective meus,-a,-um. It is modifing filii, which is indeed nominative plural as it is the subject of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronD.2

Fílií meí Rómæ habitant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuillermoMontana

Is it just me or does filii sound like filiae in the audio.

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