"Ea Novi Eboraci studet."

Translation:She studies in New York.

August 27, 2019

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zia177448

XD I'm looking forward to the discussions on this one! I know enough people are bothered by "Nueva York" in the Spanish course and "Novi Eboraci" kind of adds an extra level of fun! ;)

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ernesto813220

Do you imagine the New York song in latin? ~Nova Eboraci Nova Eboraci~

August 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I don't understand why they are bothered, Nueva York, it's beautiful.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentM929983

Whats the break down of the name new York. New is pretty obvious. Whats the connection to York?

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robbadob

The name of the town York actually comes from the Latin word Eborācum through a complex series of changes. The Latin word itself comes from the local Celtic word for the area.

Eborācum, 2nd declension: nom. Eborācum, gen. Eborācī, dat. Eborācō.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shwmae

And in case anyone's interested, the local Celtic (Brittonic) word was Eborākom or Eburākon. This is probably eburos "yew tree" + -ākon/m "place of, belonging to", or the intial element could be Eburos a Celtic personal name.

Although modern Brittonic languages (Welsh, Cornish, Breton) have lost their case endings, Common Brittonic (CB) had plenty, like Latin. You can see similarities between the Latin and CB endings:

Latin: nom. Eborācum, gen. Eborācī, dat. Eborācō

CB: nom. Eborākom, gen. Eborākī, dat. Eborākūi

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

God I love this website!

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoroTanuki

Proto-Celtic eburos (yew) + -ākos (-ock) -> Eborākom

Brythonic Eborākom

Latin Eborācum

Old English folk-etymological alteration of Eboracum, based on eofor (boar) + wīc (village) -> Eoforwīċ

Old Norse Jór(ví)k

Middle English York, Ȝork

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerAndereLerner

Eboracum is the Latin name of York. :)

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nick_Pr

It was the Roman name for the city of York in England.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liambambawei

It was renamed in honour of the then-Duke of York (Charles II's brother, the future James II) after it was taken from the dutch

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac3972

That makes a lot more sense. I was wondering what kind of changes and time elapse would have to happen for Eboracum to get to York. Turns out a military victory. . . how Roman.

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sousquark

New York (city) was New Amsterdam in the area of New Netherlands and was renamed in 1664 when it was taken from the Dutch.

The original York got its name by a series of changes over many centuries. There were plenty of Vikings in York (Jorvik) but not many Dutch.

New York didn't exist when Latin developed so the name has been latinised more recently to make it sound good in Latin lessons.

September 14, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angellore-Raven

Probably the latin name of York (in England) when it was founded, I guess.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet

Yes, I went to university in York, and it was Eboracum during the Roman conquest.

August 28, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tawelfan22

The Archbishop of York's clerical title is still +Ebor.

September 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daguipa

I don't know for sure, but since the Romans had a presence in Britain (Britannia), I guess it is probably the Latin name of the English city later called York.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ehsan_Mehmed

Perhaps York in England? Just like between New Zealand and Zealand in the Netherlands

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoseeV64

Zeeland is a province of the Netherlands.

September 20, 2019, 4:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RicardoSeb15

Good question. I wonder the same and found this on Internet: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eboracum?wprov=sfla1

Eboracum was the name of what today is York in UK.

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielePrisco17

The Romans used to call Eburacum the city of York

August 30, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LobsangC

Okay, now that we have established a precedent and some useful parameters, can anyone tell me what "eboracum" means -that would complete this inquiry quite nicely!

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LobsangC

Okay, I have just found out. Eboracum was the Roman's largest town in northern Britain apparently meaning 'Yew' tree place, later etymology suggests uses concomitant with the words for 'ivy' and also 'ivory' -almost too interesting to be useful, but for what it's worth, from Wikipedia.

September 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edmund403301

Northern England. Not Britain.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kaet

True, it's only about halfway up the island.

September 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stergi3

Imin ancient Greek it is 'Εβόρακον for York. But it is the ancient name. It is Υόρκη in Modern Greek. So I am not sure it is right Eborakum in a modern view of Latin

September 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

So Eborakon, and Yorkè (for the ones who can't read Greek letters.

September 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MinhTranDo

Is Novi Eboraci in locative case? So -um will change into -i in locative?

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DecarbonatedOdes

Why is New York in the genitive case not the ablative case?

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wibke260819

Sorry, my initial answer was wrong. It is locative, like the "domi" example earlier.

September 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricEwing5928

From Lewis and Short Lexicon via the Perseus Project: Eborācum , i, n., I.the capital of the Brigantes in Britain, now York, Eutr. 8, 19; Inscr. Orell. 190 al.

Two things here; yes this could be considered the Roman equivalent of York, hence Novum Eboracum for New York.

However, I'm a lot more concerned with the use of the genitive here to denote location. I'm no Cicero, but I don't think this is very good use of Latin inflection.

September 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Feles11

Latin does not have the pronouns he, she or it! Stop using “ea” to mean she, when there is no stress!!!

September 17, 2019
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